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Math And Science

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NEWS
November 24, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University will receive a $2.4 million grant, one of 12 in the nation, to encourage and prepare more of its math and science majors to teach at the middle and high school level. The money comes from the recently formed National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI), based in Dallas, which has been charged with funding the replication of successful programs to improve math and science education in the United States. The effort follows a 2005 national report that estimated that in 1999 and 2000, more than two-thirds of students in some grades were taught some math and science courses by educators who had not majored in those subjects or had no certification in them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Laquan, 13, has a charming smile that draws people to him. He communicates his feelings well, and easily expresses his wants and needs. Laquan enjoys talking with adults and delights in receiving attention from them. He is a good listener. Very creative, Laquan delights in drawing scenes and characters that appear in the monster and alien books he loves to read. He is also very athletic and plays a variety of sports, including basketball and football. He especially enjoys watching football games on television.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services American Association for Advancement of Science and American Association of University Women
In 1990, a national report by the American Association of University Women showed there was a strong relationship between math and science and pre- adolescent self-esteem: As girls "learn" they are not good at math and science, their sense of self-worth and aspirations deteriorate. This study inspired the Ms Foundation to undertake the Take Our Daughters to Work campaign. In the year 2000, women are expected to make up nearly half of those entering the work force for the first time.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is McSiip (A.) a new soft drink at a fast-food restaurant or (B.) a training program for math and science teachers? McSiip, Math and Computer Science Instructional Improvement Project, is a state-financed training program that recently gained national recognition as one of 12 exemplary projects. Housed at Glassboro State College, it offers courses and workshops for public-school math and science teachers, said program director Janet Caldwell. This summer teachers may enroll in a five-credit course in teaching the computer language Pascal, or a week-long workshop in methods of teaching decimals, fractions and percentages.
NEWS
September 29, 1998
Two years ago, this board set a 12-year goal for this school district to reach the moon: that is, 95 percent of our children performing at world-class levels in reading, math and science. . . . I am pleased to report to you that we are ahead of schedule. - Superintendent David W. Hornbeck In remarks yesterday to the Philadelphia school board
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Starting today and running through next Wednesday, the Philadelphia Renaissance in Science and Mathematics (PRISM) is sponsoring its first weeklong celebration of math and science through a series of activities for children and adults. The program is called "Moving Ahead with Science and Mathematics Week. " According to Frank Betts, PRISM's program manager, the event has been designed to focus public attention on the important roles that math and science play in everyday life. For example, families will have the chance to participate Sunday in a Center City treasure hunt as they seek to solve a series of math and science questions for fun and prizes.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
After noticing a lack of interest in math and science courses among students at Rancocas Valley Regional High School, school officials are planning to revamp the studies to encourage higher levels of learning. Henry G. Cram, district superintendent, said the school was applying for $50,000 under the Governor's Grants for Excellence in Science and Mathematics program for a project officials were calling "Concentrated Core Science and Mathematics. " The project is designed to use existing personnel combined with "external expertise" to teach students useful courses in both subjects and "will hopefully inspire them to move forward in those areas and seek higher-level courses," according to Cram.
NEWS
June 12, 1997
A new international study provides good, bad and unsettling news about American education. It also builds the case for continuing the struggle for higher academic standards nationwide - because there's now a clear link between standards and achievement. The good news: American fourth graders are among the best in the world in science and perform above the international average in math, according to a study of 26 nations released Tuesday. Fourth graders in only one other nation, Korea, scored significantly higher in science; American kids performed roughly the same as their counterparts in Japan and Australia.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Anthony VanLoan just loves shapes, any shapes. The 4-year-old resident of Burlington City knows that a triangle has three sides and can tell you much of what there is to know about rectangles, squares and circles. But what he likes most of all is using them all to make a picture, preferably one gigantic picture. To Olivia Baxter, an English and reading teacher at Wilbur Watts Intermediate School in Burlington City, helping Anthony turn shapes into a picture is just as enjoyable as teaching students to read.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Haverford College has been selected as one of eight colleges nationwide to receive a 1995 education grant from the Miami-based John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Haverford said it would use the $231,000 to run two-week professional development programs in math and science for 18 teachers, three each from six area middle schools. This summer, the teachers will come from the Beeber, Fitzsimons, Gillespie, Rhodes, Shoemaker, and Strawberry Mansion Middle Schools, all from the central-west region of the Philadelphia School District.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
A 10-year-old with sparkling eyes and a brilliant smile, Neilek has a great sense of humor and boundless energy, which he channels into sports. His favorites are football and soccer, followed by swimming. For a breather, he plays video games and watches cartoons on TV. The best days of the year, he says, are his birthday and Christmas, because he feels special and receives gifts. Neilek aspires to be a scientist or a professional football player. Inquisitive and interested in learning, he is an A/B student and proud of it. Math and science are his favorite subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Friendly and easygoing, 13-year-old Jade is a standout for both her great sense of humor and her compassion. She so loves animals she dreams of one day traveling to a jungle to see many many different species, and of eventually becoming a veterinarian. On the other hand, Jade also thinks about a career in entertainment. A seventh grader, Jade loves to learn and excels academically. Math and science are her favorite subjects. A bundle of energy, she also participates in the CrossFit conditioning program, and wants to be a cheerleader and play soccer.
NEWS
March 8, 2015
STATE CLASS A FIRST ROUND Math, Civics and Sciences 81, Notre Dame-East Stroudsburg 79 (OT): Nick Jones (15 points) went 4 for 4 from the line in overtime, including a pair of free throws with less than a minute remaining that put the Mighty Elephants ahead by 81-79 in Pleasant Valley. St. John's recruit Samir Doughty had 27 points, 10 rebounds, eight assists and five steals. Saheed Peoples scored 14 points and Luis Reyes added 12 points for MCS.    Math, Civics and Sciences finished No. 2 in District 12. Notre Dame was the District 11 champion.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
You are not going to understand the topic of Shashwat Kishore's research project, and that is OK. Suffice it to say that those who do understand it - a branch of abstract mathematics called representation theory - are very impressed. "What he did could be a good part of a Ph.D. thesis for a graduate student at a good university," said Pavel Etingof, a math professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. That will have to wait a few years. Kishore, 18, is a senior at Unionville High School in Kennett Square.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twin sisters Doris and Shirley Blumberg were top students at Philadelphia High School for Girls. They were especially sharp with numbers, joining an after-school club devoted to math games and puzzles. So the 17-year-olds were perplexed when they were summoned to the principal's office one day in May 1942. Math, it turned out, was the reason. The principal told them that the Army was recruiting numerically minded young women for a high-stakes task: to calculate ballistics trajectories during World War II. The stories of the sisters and several of their colleagues are featured in The Computer Wore Heels , a new "book app" created for the iPad by Temple University filmmaker LeAnn Erickson.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan by the University of Pennsylvania to cut back on two of its branch libraries - one for engineering and the other for math, physics, and astronomy - has yielded an outcry from students and professors who say the books are critical to their studies and research. Both libraries are housed within the same campus buildings as their departments, and are heavily used by undergraduates and graduate students alike. Mathematics students, in particular, said many of the books and materials they need are not available electronically, and they must browse the library to find what they need.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps his parents should have seen it coming. At age 3, Jonah Kallenbach was teaching his nursery-school classmates about the space program. At 9, he started to learn concepts in calculus. The following year, it was black holes. Nevertheless, the Ambler family was thrilled this week when Jonah, now 17, won second prize and $75,000 in one of the most prestigious high school academic competitions: the Intel Science Talent Search. Kallenbach, a senior at Germantown Academy, wrote a computer program to predict how "disordered" proteins would interact in the body, a process involved in certain cancers and tuberculosis.
SPORTS
February 18, 2013 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
No representatives from Temple, UCLA, or St. John's were spotted at Southern during Saturday night's Public League Class A championship game. But the three finalists for Rysheed Jordan's services will no doubt hear about his last-minute heroics. With 0.1 second remaining, after missing his first attempt from the free-throw line, the prized recruit calmly buried the second to give Roberts Vaux a 62-61, come-from-behind victory over stunned Math, Civics, and Sciences. With 10.7 seconds to go, the 6-foot-3 phenom hit two foul shots to forge a 61-61 tie. That was followed by his steal in front of the MC&S bench.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is partnering with a foundation to recruit and train as many as 100 new math and science teachers to spend three years in high-need schools across the state, including ones in Camden and Pemberton Borough. The initiative, announced Friday by Gov. Christie, will cost $9 million, all of it donated. Teaching recruits will have backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and math - the so-called STEM subjects - and will be trained in a model created by the Princeton-based Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation emphasizing teacher preparation and retention.
SPORTS
October 19, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer
JEREMIAH "Lump" Worthem entered the it's-heating-up part of the basketball recruiting process expecting to make all five of the permissible official visits. Instead, he cut things short after two and, in retrospect, could have done so after one. Robert Morris it is for the 6-6, 205-pound Worthem, a senior small forward from Math, Civics and Sciences Charter. "I felt Robert Morris in my heart during the visit, which was three weekends ago for their football Homecoming," Worthem said.
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