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NEWS
February 16, 1990 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
A federally funded reading and math program that the troubled William L. Sayre Middle School lost because of a bureaucratic foul-up has been reinstated. The school will get the services for the 1990-91 school year, according to a state Department of Education spokeswoman. "That's great," said Julian Jenkins, head of Sayre's Home and School Association after learning that the program was reinstated. "Now we can tell elementary school parents that (their children) will be coming into a school with remedial reading and math and computers.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | By Lillian Micko, Special to The Inquirer
With some reservations, the Cherry Hill school board has approved a pilot program for a group of elementary school pupils to use calculators in their math classes. It would mark the first time calculators would be used in the Cherry Hill School District on the elementary level as a required tool for math instruction. The three-month program, approved after considerable discussion at the board's work meeting Monday, will begin in February. It will affect 33 sixth- grade and 27 fourth-grade pupils at the Sharp School who are in middle- ability math groups.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | By Anne L. Boles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Eighth graders in the Coatesville school district don't add up when it comes to math, at least not when compared with other middle schoolers across the state. In the state's new exams, given last spring, students in the Coatesville district's three middle schools scored below the statewide average in math, but more or less held their own in reading. Fifth graders from the district's seven elementary schools also took tests in the same subjects, and scored slightly below the statewide average on both.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bryn Mawr College professor Victor Donnay was talking about malaria and global warming and billiards and infected needles among drug addicts. And you thought math wasn't interesting. That's right: mathematics. But not just any math. This is Chaotic Dynamical Systems, an updated body of math that combines the basics with phenomenal computer models, and lets students look into the future. Arithmetic, meet Luke Skywalker. At a time when educators are complaining about the lack of interest in math and science among American students - one survey shows less than half the country's doctoral candidates in math are from the United States - Bryn Mawr is aggressively expanding its program.
NEWS
June 28, 2011
The Philadelphia School District has shown improvement in state standardized test scores for the ninth straight year, according to data released last night. In math, 59 percent of students scored advanced or proficient, up 2.7 points from last year. In reading, 52.3 percent scored advanced or proficient, up 2.3 points from last year. Meanwhile, at yesterday's School Reform Commission meeting, officials said that they will rehire 174 K-3 teachers who were laid off earlier this month as part of an agreement with the city to reduce class sizes in those grades.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Edward MacNeal, a business consultant and author of the book Mathsemantics: Making Numbers Talk Sense, will appear at Borders Books & Music at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday to present a new way to look at math. MacNeal's theory is a mix of math and English, and offers a solution to the dilemma of deciphering what numbers mean. MacNeal's approach is said to liberate people with "math phobia," and to provide educators with the tools to teach math without instilling fear. Admission is free.
NEWS
July 20, 2001 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Brad, 13, is saving for a telescope and a microscope. He wants to look at leaves, plants and insects in daytime. At night he wants to gaze at the stars. He can identify many stars, and science is his favorite subject in school. He will be going into special education at a seventh-grade level this fall, and math is his strength. There is abuse and neglect in Brad's background, and he receives therapy for issues of loss and behavior. He takes medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and impulse control.
NEWS
February 10, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Marlin, 10, participates in many physical activities, including bike-riding and swimming. He also enjoys being part of a team and is quick to join in a neighborhood game of basketball, baseball or football. He's in fourth grade, and math is his best subject - though he's also the top speller in his class and even enjoys homework. His favorite movie is The Lion King. He likes to play video games and checkers, and also enjoys listening to music, watching cartoons, and reading the newspaper.
NEWS
September 15, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Angelique was beaming when she landed a lead role in her school play, Romeo and Juliet. Drama, in fact, is Angelique's favorite subject. This 12-year-old is in sixth grade and has a variety of interests. She likes math, music, and arts and crafts classes best. Away from school, she enjoys riding a bike, writing in her diary, coloring and drawing pictures, playing basketball, swimming and going on a water slide at the pool, using a computer, and watching television. There is abuse and neglect in her background.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lewis Crocker's summer days are not action-packed. "Right now?" he said yesterday when asked where he'd normally be at 10:30 a.m. on a July day. "Home in bed watching television. " He had tried to find a newspaper route, but had no luck. So slow that Crocker, 14, has actually volunteered to go to summer school. You can find him these days in a basement room at Rutgers University working on a computer, along with Niikya Schley, who normally would be cruising the streets of Camden on her bike, and Theresa Figueroa, who has taken time off from her summer soap-opera schedule.
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