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Math

LIVING
May 23, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Khalif, 11, lives in a residential facility with 76 other children, so he has a lot of company when he yells, "Come on, you guys, let's go shoot hoops. " He's been honored for high scoring in bowling, soccer, and street hockey, and basketball is his top choice of sports. Math is his strongest subject in school. His favorite class is science, and he enjoys using the computer to find out how volcanos are formed and why they erupt. He was exposed to drugs in-utero, and testing shows a slightly below-average IQ. Emotional problems hinder his progress, his therapist says, and a support program helps him deal with impulse control and trust issues.
LIVING
April 16, 1993 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Jodie is a friendly 14-year-old, with an easygoing manner that encourages others to get to know her. This 5 foot, 6 inch teenager has a happy laugh and a winning smile. Though she has been in several foster homes in the last eight years, and has suffered deprivation, abuse and neglect, she is still warm-hearted and affectionate. Her staff parent at the center where she lives with 72 other children, says she is kind, helpful, pleasant, shares well, and is sensitive to the sadness other people are feeling.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
AN ADVOCACY GROUP campaigning nationally for public pension reform visited Philadelphia yesterday promising to "expose" the city's top pension recipients - including one retiree with a $4.5 million estimated lifetime payout. But what the group really exposed was its own fuzzy math. The Chicago-based Taxpayers United of America released a list of local pension recipients, topped by former Police Commissioner Sylvester Johnson, who they said would get an "estimated lifetime pension" of $4.5 million.
NEWS
July 18, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William H. Boucher, 81, of Mendenhall, a retired mathematics teacher, real estate developer and active West Chester University alumnus, died of heart failure July 8 at Jenner's Pond, a retirement community in Jennersville. For 35 years, Mr. Boucher taught math at Mount Pleasant High School in Wilmington. As a tribute to his teaching skills, one of Mr. Boucher's students, James Griffin, established an academic chair in his name at Indiana University in Bloomington. While teaching, Mr. Boucher ran several businesses, including B&B Co., which has developed residential subdivisions throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania and New Castle County, Del. After retiring from teaching in 1983, he continued to be active with B&B and had a firewood business.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Charlie Frush and Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Teacher burnout has not been a problem for Joseph T. Rears. At age 60, the Willingboro resident has been named Burlington County's teacher of the year. On Oct. 2, the New Jersey teacher of the year will be announced. And Rears will be one of the 21 competitors, one from each county. Rears, who teaches at Willingboro High School, joined the Willingboro school system 11 years ago fresh from a 26-year military career. "My first teaching job was in Memorial Junior High and I taught math," he said.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
In 1991, less than half of the Chester Upland School District's fifth graders passed a test of minimum skills in math, according to recently released figures, while across the county in the Radnor School District, all of the students passed. It is a pattern that, within a few percentage points, tends to repeat itself each year. County school officials said that is because the test results are not simply caused by different curriculums, but by differences between students and in community demographics.
NEWS
October 22, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - The students in Math 232, integral vector calculus at Pennsylvania State University, can watch their teacher perform on two stages this fall. One is their yellow-walled classroom in the Willard Building. The other is Beaver Stadium. The teacher is John C. Urschel, the 305-pound starting right guard for the Penn State football team, a first-team All-Big Ten selection, and an NFL prospect. Urschel finished his undergraduate math courses in three years, earning a perfect 4.0 grade-point average.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tutor Gwen Richardson never really thought her work with Northeast students struggling in math and reading made all that much difference. The state disagreed. In fact, Richardson and other staff members at the Gen. J. Harry LaBrum Middle School made $12,847 worth of difference. On Feb. 10, Gov. Casey announced that the state would pay LaBrum that amount because the school's students scored significantly better on a statewide reading and math test last year than they had the year before.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
Faculty and students of St. William's School, in Lawncrest, haven't had much to cheer about lately. The Archdiocese decided to close the small school and send its pupils to St. Cecilia's, in Fox Chase. But a ray of sunshine lit up flagging spirits this spring when a shy 10-year-old girl named Josephine Nguyen won first-place honors out of 1.4 million students who competed in the nationwide "First in Math" competition. When it appeared that Josephine was going to prevail, a sign went up in front of the school, at Rising Sun Avenue and Devereaux Street, to let the world know, and faculty and fellow fourth-grade students had something to cheer.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | By Peter Finn and Jane Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Jacob A. Richman, 85, who for 45 years taught math with humor and verve in the Philadelphia School District, died Thursday at West Jersey Hospital- Marlton. He lived most of his life in Philadelphia but recently lived in Gibbsboro. "He was very, very extraordinary. He didn't teach math - he taught people," said Leslie Joseph, a teacher at Roxboro High School, where Mr. Richman was head of the math department before his retirement in 1972. Joseph said that Mr. Richman, who spent 30 years at Southern High School in South Philadelphia before moving to the department chair at Roxboro, was always looking for ways to make math exciting and easy to grasp.
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