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NEWS
July 15, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William H. Boucher, 81, of Mendenhall, a retired mathematics teacher, real estate developer and active West Chester University alumnus, died of heart failure July 8 at Jenner's Pond, a retirement community in Jennersville. For 35 years, Mr. Boucher taught math at Mount Pleasant High School in Wilmington. As a tribute to his teaching skills, one of Mr. Boucher's students, James Griffin, established an academic chair in his name at Indiana University in Bloomington. While teaching, Mr. Boucher ran several businesses, including B&B Co., which has developed residential subdivisions throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania and New Castle County, Del. After retiring from teaching in 1983, he continued to be active with B&B and had a firewood business.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
The Phillies will be in the thick of the playoff race again this year. That's no mere baseball expert talking. The prediction comes from a mathematician: Bruce Bukiet, of the New Jersey Institute of Technology. According to a statistical model that Bukiet has been refining for more than a decade, the Phils will wind up in a three-way tie in the National League East, with the Mets and the Braves. Bukiet, an associate math professor at the Newark school, says each team should win about 88 games, give or take six. During the season, he also will pick the outcome of each individual game, adjusting his numbers to reflect which pitchers are starting, injuries, and other factors.
NEWS
July 2, 2007 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Bright and witty, Elliott is a friendly 13-year-old who enjoys the outdoors, riding his bike, and playing video games. He loves learning new things and asks many questions on a variety of topics. Elliott is looking forward to attending camp this summer. He is also interested in music. When he received a surprise gift of a guitar last Christmas, he just started playing it. Eager to hone his technique, he was thrilled to get a lesson from a local singer/songwriter during a recent visit to an area television station.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While SAT scores for college-bound students rose over the last decade in math, their verbal scores stagnated. Blame the Internet? Some educators who study SAT trends speculate that the increase in teen Web surfing affects their reading skills. "Reading a Web page is not the same as a book," said Trent Anderson, executive director for pre-college programs at Kaplan Educational Centers, a national test-preparation company. Others, though, have different answers. Susan Fuhrman, dean of the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Education, said verbal scores had remained flat because more students whose first language was not English were taking the test . She called for more emphasis on early literacy programs.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BERNARD J. ROBINSON, a mathematics teacher in Philadelphia public schools for 25 years and an Air Force veteran, died Sept. 12 of pneumonia. He was 51 and lived in South Philadelphia. "He was a caring and giving person," said his niece, Simone Bias. "He was a family man, always kind and doing something for someone. He was well-rounded and enjoyed life. " Bernard was born in Philadelphia to Bernard B. Robinson and Audrey O. Robinson-Young. He graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School, and received a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Temple University and a master's from Arcadia University.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | By TOM COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The 14 children sit in folding chairs at six-sided tables. There are six at one table, five at another, two at the table near the window, one child alone at a table in the middle of the room. Many of the girls have their hair in tightly braided pigtails. In front of each child on the table is an abacus, the ancient Oriental device for counting by moving up and down 13 wires enclosed in a rectangular frame. The dignified, gray-haired teacher explains one step of the problem and asks the children what to do next.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | By Robin A. Larsen, Special to The Inquirer
Extending a medium-sized beaker over a mountain of rice, Academy Street School kindergarten teacher Gail Clark invites four children to guess whether Joshua Monier, 5, has a picked a container that will be "too much, too little or just right" to fill the one in her hand. Joshua, who has chosen the largest beaker, scoops up the rice and waves his container high in the air. He giggles happily as he rains down the grain in a noisy cascade. "It'll be too much - watch," warns classmate Nakia Burt, 6. Sure enough, Joshua quickly overfills Clark's smaller beaker, and Nakia jumps up and down, crowing in triumph.
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | By Arthur Howe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surrounded at a staff meeting by young Wharton School and Harvard MBAs, Vanguard Group chairman John C. Bogle is easy to spot. He's the one without a hand calculator. The fact is, Bogle doesn't need a calculator. He uses his head. "It's withering," said one embarrassed executive at the giant investment firm. "Nine times out of 10, he'll beat those of us who use a PC or calculator. Sometimes, if it's a really complicated math calculation, he'll pull out a slide rule. " Bogle is one of a vanishing breed of business executives - those who don't use calculators or computers to help them with their work.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | by Shantee Woodards, Daily News Staff Writer
Flames erupted from the Overbrook High School auditorium yesterday, but the Fire Department wasn't needed. In a science assembly, nearly 300 students watched as the speaker performed an experiment to find out which gas is faster, carbon dioxide or propane. The audience volunteer came on stage and poured carbon dioxide inside a tank containing a small candle. It extinguished the flame in just over one second, but a fireball erupted when the propane reached the fire. The volunteer jumped back in a panic as the audience laughed.
NEWS
August 14, 2002
THE EXPANSION of the Convention Center may be the best idea ever conceived. If nothing else, the prospect of the half billion dollar project has focused attention on the center's operations, galvanized lawmakers, and has even brought Mayor Street to the table to finally solve the labor problems that have plagued the center. Does that mean we should start building the thing as soon as Harrisburg gives the OK? Not necessarily. Harrisburg has used the expansion as an effective carrot to force city leaders, the Convention Center Authority, and unions to solve the problems that are sending customers away.
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