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NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Scores on a new standardized test confirm an old problem for New Jersey high school students: math. Students in grades four through 11 in about 10 states, including New Jersey, took the controversial Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Career exams last spring. The New Jersey Department of Education on Tuesday released state-level results showing the percentage of students who met expectations in math and language arts. The majority of New Jersey students in all grades failed to meet expectations.
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public schools are a perpetual worry for Philadelphia, and scant attention is often paid to another weighty educational problem: adults who struggle to read. But nearly half of all adults in the city - more than half a million men and women - lack the basic skills necessary to qualify for postsecondary training or hold jobs that permit them to support a family. Many function below eighth-grade levels. The Mayor's Commission on Literacy is making inroads. Its work is attracting national attention: praise from the U.S. Department of Education, and designation as a model site from Digital Promise, a nonprofit established by act of Congress in 2008 to use technology to improve education for all Americans.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Madison Russ, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf vetoed the Republican-backed $30.1 billion budget in its entirety Tuesday night, a move that leaves Pennsylvania without a spending plan and sets the stage for a partial government shutdown. A visibly frustrated Wolf told reporters shortly after 9 that the spending plan the Republican-controlled legislature sent him was riddled with "gimmicks," as well as "smoke and mirrors, and a lot of kicking the can down the road. " He said it failed to adequately fund public education or provide property-tax relief to homeowners, and contended it would worsen the state's finances.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert Eugene Filano, 89, of West Chester, a decorated World War II veteran and later a mathematics professor at West Chester University, died Monday, May 18, of respiratory failure at Barclay Friends in West Chester. Born in Penfield, Pa., he was the son of Italian immigrants James E. and Rosy Ulizio Filano. He graduated in 1943 from Jay Township High School and went into the Army Air Corps, completing 33 combat missions against the Japanese mainland as a B-29 bombardier and radar navigator.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
IT LOOKS AS IF today's election might be the one, at least the rare one, in which values outweigh race or ethnicity. Generally, but not always, we vote for people who look like us. It is racial, but not racist. We gravitate toward those who are like us because we feel they will understand us. It is tribal, something buried in the deep recesses of our reptilian brains. Not everyone does that, of course. In recent decades, liberal whites have been more open to voting across the color line than Philly blacks.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
If the contest for mayor were between a candidate who supports schools and one who doesn't, it wouldn't be much of a campaign. Declaring education important and vowing to fund it accordingly is easy. How to pay for it is the hard question - one the mayoral candidates, as their answers on today's op-ed page show, aren't especially eager to answer. Like most core government services, public education has to be funded on a recurring basis. That means one-time windfalls like Jim Kenney's tax-lien sale and several candidates' welcome promises to collect back taxes won't get the School District that far. Other than savaging Mayor Nutter's proposed 9 percent property tax hike, the candidates are short on concrete plans for the broad-based taxes that could significantly boost long-term school funding.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
HAMBURG, Pa. - Math, Civics, and Sciences Charter made short work of Millersburg on Friday in a PIAA Class A quarterfinal at Hamburg High. The Mighty Elephants steamrolled the District 3 Indians, 92-60. Keith Griffin led the charge with 30 points. Griffin scored the game's first nine points during a first-quarter spurt that ended with MC&S ahead, 19-0, four minutes into the game. "We just started off aggressively," he said. "Easy layups, back doors, and everybody was knocking down shots.
SPORTS
March 12, 2015 | By Paul Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Math, Civics, and Sciences advanced to its fifth consecutive state quarterfinal Tuesday night with a 65-41 win over Meadowbrook Christian in a PIAA Class A second-round game at East Pennsboro. St. John's recruit Samir Doughty scored 16 points and grabbed nine rebounds, and sophomore forward Luis Reyes had 10 rebounds. Donovan Barnes added 15 points. Also at East Pennsboro, George Mason-bound forward Ahmad Gilbert scored 18 points and drained four three-pointers to steer Constitution past Shanksville-Stoney Creek, 62-32.
NEWS
March 8, 2015
STATE CLASS A FIRST ROUND Math, Civics and Sciences 81, Notre Dame-East Stroudsburg 79 (OT): Nick Jones (15 points) went 4 for 4 from the line in overtime, including a pair of free throws with less than a minute remaining that put the Mighty Elephants ahead by 81-79 in Pleasant Valley. St. John's recruit Samir Doughty had 27 points, 10 rebounds, eight assists and five steals. Saheed Peoples scored 14 points and Luis Reyes added 12 points for MCS.    Math, Civics and Sciences finished No. 2 in District 12. Notre Dame was the District 11 champion.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia School District says it would cost as much as $500 million to enroll 15,000 more students in new charter schools - about 20 times more than the amount offered by a private group. The Philadelphia School Partnership this week announced a gift of $25 million to the beleaguered school system to "take the cost issue off the table" and encourage the district to consider 39 charter applications on their merits alone. But were the SRC to add those charter seats, the price over six years would be much higher - if a fixed cost claimed by the district but disputed by PSP is used to do the math.
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