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NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
In second grade, Josephine Nguyen discovered she loved a game in school - First in Math. She could play it at home, on a computer. But her parents, Vietnamese refugees, didn't own one. So her father, Joseph Nguyen, who works in a nail salon, took her first to the Lawncrest branch of the Free Library. Computer time is limited. After an hour there, he took his daughter to the Cottman Avenue branch. Then the Castor branch. Every day, they went from library to library. First in Math, founded by inventor Robert Sun, is now in 5,000 schools across the nation, played by 1.5 million students, and more than 110,000 students in 320 schools in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Paige Darden, 81, of West Mount Airy, a former math and science teacher and deacon, died Tuesday, April 15, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania from multiple organ failure. Born in Atlantic City, Mr. Darden graduated from Atlantic City High School in 1950. In 1961, he earned his bachelor's degree from Wilberforce University in Ohio, where he pledged Alpha Phi Alpha. He earned his master's degree in education from Temple University in 1971. Mr. Darden served four years in the Air Force, beginning in 1952, during the Korean War. He was discharged as an airman first class.
SPORTS
April 20, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
As most of his teammates yanked their ties tight and tucked in their dress shirts after last Saturday's game at PPL Park, Zac MacMath stood in front of his locker in full uniform. It would be easy to understand if he did not have the energy to pull it over his head. The Union are in the midst of a hectic stretch, and the goalkeeper has been one of their busiest players. They play their third game in eight days Saturday when they host the Houston Dynamo at PPL Park at 4 p.m. The Union (1-2-4)
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
I am reading about graph theory and the pairwise relationships between objects. Very soon, there will be many pairwise relationships scheduled between basketball teams, and it is very important to understand these. Reading about graph theory is not fun - at least not for me - but it will be necessary to understand when it is time to decide if there is a graph that can properly predict whether the fourth representative from the Atlantic Coast Conference is superior in time, space, and three-point percentage to the automatic qualifier from the Sun Belt Conference.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan by the University of Pennsylvania to cut back on two of its branch libraries - one for engineering and the other for math, physics, and astronomy - has yielded an outcry from students and professors who say the books are critical to their studies and research. Both libraries are housed within the same campus buildings as their departments, and are heavily used by undergraduates and graduate students alike. Mathematics students, in particular, said many of the books and materials they need are not available electronically, and they must browse the library to find what they need.
SPORTS
February 1, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Zac MacMath played every minute of every game last season for the Union in goal, so he was among the many who didn't see it coming when the team selected University of Connecticut keeper Andre Blake with the first overall pick of the Major League Soccer SuperDraft. Immediately after the selection, team manager John Hackworth maintained that MacMath would still be the starter, but the move certainly brings more competition. "I think I was a little bit surprised, and obviously I understand why they picked him," said MacMath earlier this week during preseason workouts at YSC Sports in Wayne.
SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electrical and Technology's James Suber was well prepared for Thursday evening's Public League Division A matchup against Math, Civics and Sciences. In particular, the 6-foot-6, 200-pound senior forward was ready to square off with former Bartram teammate Mike Watkins, a 6-9, 220-pound junior and Penn State commit. "He's my brother, a close friend," Suber said. "Having played with him at Bartram, I kind of knew his game. I wanted to keep him off the block, make him use his left hand.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
NEW YORK - Julia Roberts has a line in August: Osage County , the all-star adaptation of the Tracy Letts ' Pulitzer Prize winner, that sums up the cheery worldview on display in this dysfunctional family free-for-all. "Thank God we can't tell the future," Roberts' character, the oldest and seemingly most together of the three Weston sisters, sighs. "We'd never get out of bed. " "That was really the one line of mine that just knocks you out," Roberts says. "Because it's so true, and it's so heartbreaking.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timothy Tam, 61, of Huntingdon Valley, an assistant professor of mathematics at Community College of Philadelphia, died Sunday, Nov. 24, at Holy Redeemer Hospital in Meadowbrook of injuries sustained in an automobile accident that day near his home. Born in Hong Kong, Dr. Tam received his doctorate in physics from Stony Brook University in 1982. He began teaching at CCP in 1991. Previously, he taught at Old Dominion University, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and the University of Western Ontario.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Melanie Burney and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey asked tougher questions in annual tests for elementary and middle school students, but the results remained nearly the same as last year - something state officials consider a positive outcome. The results from spring's standardized exams, released Wednesday by the state, are the first since questions in the majority of the grades tested for the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJASK) were aligned to the more rigorous Common Core Standard. Statewide, 66.7 percent of students in grades three through eight scored proficient in language arts, compared with 65.9 percent last year.
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