CollectionsMathematics
IN THE NEWS

Mathematics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Barbara Micski-Tynan Brook, 56, an assistant professor of mathematics at Camden County College for more than two decades, died Saturday at her Medford home from brain cancer. Born in Schenectady, N.Y., she had resided in Medford since 1972. Mrs. Brook had been assistant professor of mathematics at Camden County College in Blackwood since 1976. She received the college's Excellence in Teaching Award in 1989, and for the last five years she had been selected to help grade Math Advanced Placement tests at Clemson University.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John P. Cherico, 48, a math teacher in Philadelphia public schools since 1977, died Saturday at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, Camden, from a heart attack. A Haddon Township resident since 1982, he was born in Atlantic City and was raised in Margate. Mr. Cherico had been teaching Algebra I and preparation classes for PSATs in the Philadelphia High School for Girls since September. Before that he had taught math at Benjamin Franklin High School since 1979, and at Sulzberger Junior High School for one year and at Jay Cooke Junior High School for two years.
NEWS
August 6, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Rosalind E. Meier Pfefferle, 57, of Abington, a mathematics teacher, died Friday of cancer at the Roslyn Convalescent Home. Mrs. Pfefferle was born in Philadelphia and graduated in 1955 from Girls' High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics and education from Ursinus College in 1959. She taught math at Upper Moreland High School until 1972, when she left to raise her family. For 20 years, until 1993, she taught part-time at the Lakeside Center for Girls in Willow Grove and instructed homebound students for several school districts.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Claire Cohen Jacobs, 89, formerly of Haddon Township, a professor of mathematics at Rutgers University in Camden for 27 years who initiated a summer computer and math program for teenagers, died of pneumonia Monday, Sept. 26, at Compassionate Care Hospice in Wilmington. Dr. Jacobs joined the Rutgers-Camden faculty in 1964 after earning a master's degree in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania. While teaching, she earned a doctorate in education from Rutgers in the 1970s.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By Charlie Frush and Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
In addition to the English language, Regina A. Vahey often converses in another tongue at Holy Cross High School. It's called mathematics. "Math is a language," said Vahey, chairwoman of the school math department. ". . . Most people see it as a science, but it is a language. Since it's a language, it has its own words. You have to learn those symbols the same as you would a foreign language. " She wants them to tackle the terminologies before tackling the problems. "Most students don't read a math textbook; they use it to find problems," she said.
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
There comes a moment in the lives of students when familiar objects, such as apples, cease being apples. They turn, alas, into math problems. It begins early, with questions such as, "Two apples plus one apple is how many apples?" Just when you've mastered that, they want you to figure how much 30 percent diluted apple juice you would have to add to 5 gallons of 40 percent apple juice to get 35 percent apple juice. And by the time a kid gets to high school, teachers are saying things such as, "If A and B are two sets, and their product, AxB, is the set of all ordered pairs (a,b)
NEWS
June 6, 2006 | By Alfred S. Posamentier
Today's date is the third time this year that an unusual pattern appears in the date: it is 06/06/06. On April 5 we had 04/05/06, while Canada had this pattern on May 4. Patterns in mathematics abound. Sometimes the beauty is simply in the patterns, and there is no real significance beyond that. For example, where the number is equal to the sum of its digits raised to consecutive exponents: 135=11+32+53 or 598=51+92+83 or 2,427=21+42+23+74. Sometimes the pattern can be an unusual relationship between two numbers, such as pairs of numbers whose sum and product are reverses of each other (9x9=81 and 9+9=18, or 3x24=72 and 3+24=27)
NEWS
February 15, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Choose one. Mathematics is: (a) Colorless, a black and white soup of numbers. (b) Cold, with below-zero emotional components. (c) Humdrum squared. (d) Mystical. Vibrant. The essence of life. If you selected a, b or c, you might consider surgery on your left brain. Less drastic would be a trip to the Stedman Gallery at Rutgers University in Camden. There, 31 math artists have assembled 71 artworks designed to stimulate and amaze math-jaded individuals alongside intellectuals.
NEWS
August 24, 1993 | BY DAVE BARRY
Summer vacation is almost over, so today Uncle Dave has a special back-to- school "pep talk" for you young people, starting with these heartfelt words of encouragement: HA HA HA YOU HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL AND UNCLE DAVE DOESN'T NEENER NEENER NEENER. Seriously, young people, I have some important back-to-school advice for you, and I can boil it down to four simple words: "Study Your Mathematics. " I say this in light of a recent alarming Associated Press story stating that three out of every four high-school students - nearly 50 percent - leave school without an adequate understanding of mathematics.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | BY DAVE BARRY
Last month, I witnessed a chilling example of what U.S. Secretary of Education Arthur A. Tuberman was referring to in a recent speech when he said that, in terms of basic mathematics skills, the United States has become, and I quote, "a nation of stupids. " This incident occurred when my son and I were standing in line at Toys "R" Us, which is what we do for father-son bonding because it involves less screaming than Little League. Our immediate goal was to purchase an item that my son really needed, called Intruder Alert.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2016
Darren Glass is associate professor of mathematics at Gettysburg College In his recent book, The Math Myth: And Other STEM Delusions , political scientist Andrew Hacker argues, among other things, that we should not require high school students to take algebra. Part of his argument, based on data some have questioned, is that algebra courses are a major contributor to students dropping out of high school. He also argues that algebra is nothing more than an "enigmatic orbit of abstractions" that most people will never use in their jobs.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Darren Glass is associate professor of mathematics at Gettysburg College I recently saw the film The Man Who Knew Infinity , which was released in many American cities this weekend, and was struck by the beautiful telling of an inspirational story. The film, which stars Jeremy Irons and Dev Patel, is a biography of the mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan, who was born in India at the end of the 19th century. Though he flunked out of college twice, Ramanujan did mathematical research independently while working as a clerk in an accountant's office.
NEWS
January 2, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, Staff Writer
Lucien Roland Roy, 91, a mathematics professor at Villanova University for 40 years, died Monday, Dec. 28, of natural causes at a nursing home in Needham, Mass. Mr. Roy was known for his enthusiasm and high standards in the classroom, although colleagues said he was not to every student's taste. "He had a French Canadian accent, and he'd get quite wrapped up in a given theorem or something. Students would be standing there, and he's ranting and raving about how important this thing is," said David Strows, director of graduate programs.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George E. Weaver, 73, of Havertown, a longtime professor of philosophy at Bryn Mawr College, died Friday, Dec. 4, of multiple organ failure at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. At the time of his death, Dr. Weaver was the college's Harvey Wexler Professor Emeritus of Philosophy. He had received undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1969, he joined the Bryn Mawr faculty as a lecturer in the philosophy department. He rose to assistant professor in 1971, associate professor in 1976, and full professor in 1982.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU RARELY SAW Howard Wells without a camera around his neck. What started as a hobby eventually became a passion and ultimately a source of income. You weren't safe from the prying lens of Howard's camera. Nor would you want to be. His photographs captured the daily doings of his native city and its denizens. He also worked for a time for African-American newspapers the Philadelphia Tribune and the Afro-American, recording the events of the day, especially those of interest to African-Americans.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2015
Protocol Security Partners founder and CEO Dave Gentile will step down from day-to-day operations of the company. Gentile, who spent 24 years as an FBI agent in Philadelphia, will remain an unpaid consultant. He will become inspector general of the Delaware River Port Authority. The provider of security and investigative services in Blackwood, N.J., named Radek Lakomy the new CEO. Lakomy, a former member of both the Czech and Israeli special forces, served as a consultant in anti-terror roles for the Czech Republic and Israel's International Counter-Terror Institute.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOSEPH TERRANCE Heard had this dream. He would start a program for boys who have had discipline problems at school and encourage them to chase the same dream that led him to a successful career in science. It was part of Joe's lifelong commitment to encourage others to follow his path, which took him from a childhood of poverty in Philadelphia public housing to a fulfilling career in mathematics and science research. His brother, Justin, said Joe spent his "time and efforts mentoring many of the youth of our community trying to light the spark of knowledge and education wherever he could.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert Eugene Filano, 89, of West Chester, a decorated World War II veteran and later a mathematics professor at West Chester University, died Monday, May 18, of respiratory failure at Barclay Friends in West Chester. Born in Penfield, Pa., he was the son of Italian immigrants James E. and Rosy Ulizio Filano. He graduated in 1943 from Jay Township High School and went into the Army Air Corps, completing 33 combat missions against the Japanese mainland as a B-29 bombardier and radar navigator.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN & WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
At 11:20 last night, City Commissioner Stephanie Singer was at 999 signatures - one short of the 1,000 required to remain on the May 19 Democratic primary ballot, but her legal team was reviewing 18 signatures to see if they could resurrect just one. Singer, who was first elected a city commissioner in 2011, saw the number of her signatures whittled down from nearly 1,500 when the ballot-challenge process started last week. She was challenged by Daniel Bucher, who is not a candidate.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter H. Sellers, 84, of Philadelphia, one of the early pioneers of DNA research, died Saturday, Nov. 15, of cancer at home. Dr. Sellers was the ninth generation of Philadelphia's first family of scientists and engineers, according to D. Vitiello, writing in Engineering Philadelphia, published by Cornell University Press in 2014. Beginning in 1966, Dr. Sellers spent 48 years as a senior research scientist at Rockefeller University. The university called him "a brilliant and pioneering mathematician whose [work]
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|