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Matisse

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NEWS
November 12, 1992 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Henri Matisse painting that a struggling Scranton museum hoped might bring in $4 million was withdrawn from a public auction at Sotheby's in New York on Tuesday night when the highest bidder offered only $1.6 million for it. The painting, which Sotheby's last year had told the museum was worth between $4 million and $4.25 million, was withdrawn after the bidding failed to even approach the $2.3 million that had been its minimum. The withdrawal was a major setback for the Everhart Museum, which was banking on the proceeds to help it survive.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pink shrimp curl seductively on a speckled gray dish. There is a white- handled utensil, a lemon half and some white table linen. In the lower left of the painting, appears the magical, hyphenated signature: Henri-Matisse. Barbara Rothermel already knew that hot summer morning 14 months ago that the still life painted by the famous French artist in 1920 and then framed in gold in the gallery upstairs was worth plenty. It had been pegged at $300,000 six years earlier, before art prices soared.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | Inquirer photos by Michael Mally
Tickets to the coming exhibition "From Cezanne to Matisse: Great French Paintings From the Barnes Foundation" went on sale yesterday at the Art Museum. The exhibition will feature 81 paintings. The paintings will be on display at the museum from Jan. 31 through April 9.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
It has been said in various bits of commentary and reportage surrounding this month's opening of the new Barnes Foundation building that Albert Barnes wanted his collection to be shared with the general public.   Not so. Albert C. Barnes didn't want hoi polloi cluttering up his galleries because he believed that wandering into any art museum unprepared by the kind of instruction his school offered was nonsensical and a waste of time. Obviously, if he had wanted an open-door policy, he would have initiated one. He had 26 years to do so before he died.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Russian artists may have trailed their European counterparts into the modernist arena, but in terms of collecting avant-garde art, two extraordinary Russians were so far ahead of the crowd that their achievement still seems remarkable. Sergei Ivanovich Shchukin (1854-1936) and Ivan Abramovich Morozov (1871-1921) assembled collections of impressionist, postimpressionist and early modern art that were the most adventurous of their time. Since 1918, when both collections were nationalized, this art has, at least in theory, belonged to the Soviet people.
TRAVEL
April 8, 2013 | By Philippa Chaplin, Travel Editor
A few weeks ago, I wrote about a January visit to a barely-there Baltimore, and asked readers to let me know what I had missed in Charm City. Let me know, they did. A few made untoward comments about my dear Eagles. But most just expressed genuine pride in their town, made constructive suggestions on what I should see next time, and invited me back. "Baltimore is neighborhoods within the city. Federal Hill, Fells Point, Canton, Little Italy. I'm sure I haven't even touched on all of them," wrote Lee Gerdelmann, whose sister lives there.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Four contemporary classical composers walk into an art museum. No punch line. But after walking in, this quartet of composers eventually walked away having penned four new compositions, which Network for New Music will premiere Friday at the Barnes Foundation - amid the art and spaces that inspired them. The obvious historical precedent is Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition , a vivid series of musical evocations connected by a recurring promenade. Each of Network's new pieces assumes a different form, chamber-music instrumentation, and philosophy about using the eye to tease out a translation for the ear. "Music is the most incorporeal art, and, while we all accept that it is very much like a language, it is a non-representational one," said Stephen Hartke, who produced The Blue Studio , inspired by the cobalt walls in Matisse's Studio with Goldfish , which are the same shade as his own workroom in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2003 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
Grace Hartigan hung out with the big boys of abstract expressionism: Pollock, de Kooning, Kline. But she never toed the party line of ?ber-critic Clement Greenberg; even back in the '50s, Hartigan let her juicy color and looping, muscular lines encompass - horrors! - recognizable, even familiar everyday objects. A small but flavorful slice of her work from recent years is now at the Seraphin Gallery. Called "Aspects of the East," the eight paintings show an artist loosely riffing on various "orientalist" inspirations with knowing, lightly worn art-historical echoes from the odalisques of Matisse to the harems of Ingres.
NEWS
December 13, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thursday's auction of books and graphics at Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia Inc. reveals some of the highs, lows and quirks of that particular market. The top prices, for instance, are likely to be fetched by antique books with copious illustrations, to judge from presale estimates in the illustrated $10 catalog. That is because the pictures have a way of being torn from the books and framed as artwork. A four-figure price is expected for George Henry Mason's The Costume of China, one of more than 50 lots of books devoted to Chinese culture and commerce.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It seems like such an innocuous item, a colorful silk scarf adapted from a Matisse goldfish painting. For several years, however, the scarf and others like it have been a sore spot with the Matisse estate, which is run by the impressionist's grandson, Claude Duthuit. The estate forbids the reproduction of any of Matisse's works on scarves or dresses. An agent for Duthuit repeatedly has asked the Metropolitan Museum of Art, maker of the scarves, to cease production. The museum steadfastly has refused, a stance made possible because Matisse's works are not covered by copyright in the United States.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
On Friday, in front of the Delaware County Courthouse on Front Street, the Borough of Media will hold a small ceremony celebrating the hanging of Thomas Moran's monumental 1892 painting, Grand Canyon of the Colorado River . Well, not the real McCoy (or Moran), one of the masterpieces of the Philadelphia Museum of Art's collection. Media's Moran will be a very high-quality reproduction in an elaborate frame, all coated with an anti-graffiti resin. Pop-up outdoor art installations are coming to town.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Four contemporary classical composers walk into an art museum. No punch line. But after walking in, this quartet of composers eventually walked away having penned four new compositions, which Network for New Music will premiere Friday at the Barnes Foundation - amid the art and spaces that inspired them. The obvious historical precedent is Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition , a vivid series of musical evocations connected by a recurring promenade. Each of Network's new pieces assumes a different form, chamber-music instrumentation, and philosophy about using the eye to tease out a translation for the ear. "Music is the most incorporeal art, and, while we all accept that it is very much like a language, it is a non-representational one," said Stephen Hartke, who produced The Blue Studio , inspired by the cobalt walls in Matisse's Studio with Goldfish , which are the same shade as his own workroom in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
There are two pivotal moments in Fernando Trueba's lovely, elegiac The Artist and the Model , and they both have to do with the elderly gentleman played by Jean Rochefort, a sculptor and painter by the name of Marc Cros, imparting a bit of wisdom to his new, young Catalan model, Mercé (Aida Folch). In one, she finds a drawing in his studio. It is by Rembrandt, of a child learning to walk. Cros explains that the Dutch master probably knocked it off in a flash, like a snapshot, a captured moment.
TRAVEL
April 8, 2013 | By Philippa Chaplin, Travel Editor
A few weeks ago, I wrote about a January visit to a barely-there Baltimore, and asked readers to let me know what I had missed in Charm City. Let me know, they did. A few made untoward comments about my dear Eagles. But most just expressed genuine pride in their town, made constructive suggestions on what I should see next time, and invited me back. "Baltimore is neighborhoods within the city. Federal Hill, Fells Point, Canton, Little Italy. I'm sure I haven't even touched on all of them," wrote Lee Gerdelmann, whose sister lives there.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Barton Church, 86, of Narberth, an artist who taught in the Barnes Foundation's signature art appreciation program for more than 60 years, died Thursday, Feb. 21, at Lankenau Medical Center of pneumonia. Widely admired for his modesty and generosity, Mr. Church retired from the foundation in 2011 after decades of teaching the foundation's Traditions course. "Barton Church was immensely knowledgeable and was respected as a teacher by all who knew him and studied with him," said Barnes executive director and president Derek Gillman.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of the small, dark canvas with the swirling brushstrokes thinks it may be a rare find: a previously unknown painting from the hand of Vincent van Gogh. Jennifer Mass agrees that this is quite possible, but she is not contemplating the brushstrokes. She's looking at the mercuric sulfide and iron hexacyanoferrate. Those are two of the materials present in the paint, and Mass, a chemist by training, is among a small but growing group of scholars who apply the rigid principles of science to the world of art. She is head of the scientific research and analysis lab at Winterthur in Delaware, analyzing art in that museum's collection as well as for other museums and owners who come calling.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
It has been said in various bits of commentary and reportage surrounding this month's opening of the new Barnes Foundation building that Albert Barnes wanted his collection to be shared with the general public.   Not so. Albert C. Barnes didn't want hoi polloi cluttering up his galleries because he believed that wandering into any art museum unprepared by the kind of instruction his school offered was nonsensical and a waste of time. Obviously, if he had wanted an open-door policy, he would have initiated one. He had 26 years to do so before he died.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
It's not a pairing that automatically comes to mind - the prints of Picasso and the furniture of Wendell Castle - but the cofounder of cubism and the art-furniture patriarch look as if they were made for each other in Wexler Gallery's current exhibition, "The Abstract Forms of Pablo Picasso and Wendell Castle. " Picasso's curved and voluptuous lines on paper echo in Castle's three-dimensional forms, and vice versa. That the 13 Picasso works are predominantly black- or brown-on-white and the six Castles are monochromatic emphasizes the relationships between forms.
NEWS
December 11, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
The first in a series of three guest-artist exhibitions at Vox Populi Gallery has no title, but all four of its artists share a subversive sense of humor. Michael May tells the story of a mental-patient character he has invented, through a group of oil paintings depicting the character's misbegotten cures and inventions. As in mid-20th-century instructional posters, each of May's paintings is divided into several parts demonstrating the steps involved. In Extracting Spirits from Photos of Native Americans , for example, three measuring cups and bottles of denatured alcohol and mineral spirits sit on a counter; on the adjacent stove is a glass baking dish containing portraits of American Indians, with a vacuum-cleaner hose attached to its base.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patricia McCoy Burns, 78, of Gladwyne, an artist and videographer, died Monday, June 6, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. She had been hospitalized since the week before for shortness of breath, and autopsy results were pending. Mrs. Burns always found time for her art, painting portraits of her six children when they were young, son Robert said. Working in acrylics, she concentrated on abstract forms in the last few years. "Abstraction gives me room to dream. I paint purely from the passion of the paint, the moment, and my guts," Mrs. Burns wrote on her website.
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