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Matisse

NEWS
December 30, 1993 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An art conservator testified yesterday that the Barnes Foundation's La Danse, by Henri Matisse, now on display in Paris, has suffered "irreversible damages which can be reduced somewhat but never repaired. " Paul R. Himmelstein, speaking as an expert witness for opponents of the Merion foundation in a Montgomery County court case, said he examined the mural Tuesday in Paris. La Danse, he said, was cracked, its surfaces "distorted by stretcher creases," and was "all quite slack" when it should be taut.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Aside from being the author of a kiss-and-tell memoir about his years as director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas P.F. Hoving is a 1953 graduate of Princeton University. Hoving has called on his skills as a former curator to put together a small exhibition of American art selected from the collections of some of his college classmates. It continues at Princeton's art museum through July 3. The show, which celebrates the 40th reunion of Hoving's class, was proposed by Leonard L. Milberg, one of the more prominent collectors among the lenders.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1993 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother-daughter buying team from Osaka fell in love with a gold raincoat in a filmy, breathable fabric that folds into its own carrying case. They went into raptures over a scarf hand-painted with a country snow scene that was part Matisse and part Grandma Moses. They weren't so sure the lace- edged chiffon scarf would sell, but liked it enough to give it a try. So it didn't take Yoshiko and Kiyomi Fukuhara very long yesterday to place orders with three Philadelphia clothing designers, who had brought their wares here in hopes of chipping one more chink in the notoriously tough Japanese market.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1993 | By George Hough, FOR THE INQUIRER
I suppose it could be argued that we brought it all on ourselves by waiting until the penultimate week of the Matisse retrospective to plan a trip to New York. But then we would have missed finding out how the museum hot-ticket world works. The show has closed now, but the lessons we learned will be useful in dealing with the next New York blockbuster. When you call the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) from Philadelphia, you get one of those elaborate multiple-choice recordings that eventually tells you what you need to do to get tickets for the exhibit.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Recently a man browsing in a French shop came across a half-dozen landscape drawings that caught his eye. He bought them for the equivalent of about $80. When he got them home and took them out of their frames, they turned out to be pure gold, spelled van Gogh. The news account did not say how he planned to handle his windfall, but the options in such situations boil down to variations of a basic dilemma. He could keep his van Goghs and continue to come in to the office every morning, or sell them and retire to a more comfortable life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1993 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, FOR THE INQUIRER
Monstrous creatures abound this Super Bowl Sunday - off the playing field as well as on. At the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the fun kicks off at 10:30 a.m. and, before the clock runs out at 4, kids can scrimmage with some mythological creatures, huddle with a friendly Matisse-style monster, and take time out to make a multi-colored collage critter. At halftime - actually at 11:30 a.m., with a replay at 1:30 - there will be a performance of "Mozart, Monsters and Matisse" by Marshall Izen, the Emmy Award-winning writer of the PBS children's mini-series The Adventures of Coslo.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Henri Matisse painting that a struggling Scranton museum hoped might bring in $4 million was withdrawn from a public auction at Sotheby's in New York on Tuesday night when the highest bidder offered only $1.6 million for it. The painting, which Sotheby's last year had told the museum was worth between $4 million and $4.25 million, was withdrawn after the bidding failed to even approach the $2.3 million that had been its minimum. The withdrawal was a major setback for the Everhart Museum, which was banking on the proceeds to help it survive.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pink shrimp curl seductively on a speckled gray dish. There is a white- handled utensil, a lemon half and some white table linen. In the lower left of the painting, appears the magical, hyphenated signature: Henri-Matisse. Barbara Rothermel already knew that hot summer morning 14 months ago that the still life painted by the famous French artist in 1920 and then framed in gold in the gallery upstairs was worth plenty. It had been pegged at $300,000 six years earlier, before art prices soared.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The huge Matisse retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art may be the talk of the town, but New York's exceptional fall exhibition lineup also includes several other attractions of considerable interest and significance. In a year without Matisse, any one of these might merit top billing. At the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, you can examine one of the most fertile periods of modern art, that of the Russian and Soviet avant-garde, through a survey of unprecedented scope. At nearly 1,000 objects, the exhibition fills most of the expanded Frank Lloyd Wright building on upper Fifth Avenue.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For most of this century, painting has been dominated and defined by the accomplishments of Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, so much so that it's difficult to think of one without thinking of the other. Each has been enormously influential, even to this day, and each has been touted by devoted partisans as the greatest artist of modern times. As painters and as individuals, they were polar opposites. Picasso was a mercurial bohemian whose tempestuous art corresponds closely to his public persona.
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