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Matlock

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NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Big news from the Flying Scottoline Ranch. Mother Mary is moving in. Maybe. Rather, she's here, but I'm not sure how long this will last or how it will end. There are two possibilities: Either a shootout at high noon, or we'll just use our bare hands. But I'm getting ahead of myself. I'll tell you how it came about, because, like all disasters, it happened all of sudden. With tornadoes, they say you have only a few seconds before your world turns upside down. I had more notice than that, but even if it happens more slowly, you're still not ready.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | BY MICHAEL LACING
In the wake of the Clarence Thomas hearings - which brought to light what it takes to be on the highest court of the land - some not-so-well-known facts about the Supreme Court, past and present: In early days, simply used thumbs up and thumbs down when making a ruling. During summer heat waves, liberal justices often never wore anything under robe. Recently for fun, and to fight boredom, every Wednesday, they decide cases with a coin flip. Had wild fight in hotel lobby one year, resulting in hospitalization of three judges after heated debate on who's the better TV lawyer - Matlock or Mason.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
There are stories about real crime and fictional crime on TV tonight, and there's even Dallas - Claude Dallas, that is. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS MATLOCK (8 p.m., Ch. 3) - Part 1 of 2. The villains on this two-part Matlock story are more familiar as heroes. Jose Ferrer (Cyrano de Bergerac) plays one mob chieftain, William Conrad (Cannon) plays another, and Joe Penny (Riptide) plays a charming second-generation hood who romances a second- generation lawyer - Matlock's daughter (Linda Purl)
NEWS
December 9, 1986 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
Santa shows up a couple of different places at the same time tonight: NBC has him on trial for murder, CBS has him in search of a lost reindeer, and Channel 29 has him in computer-generated color. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS MATLOCK (8 p.m., Ch. 3) - Veteran actor Pat Hingle guest-stars as a street- corner Santa who's accused of murder. That charge is a bit more serious than the one Santa faced in Miracle on 34th Street, meaning that Matlock (Andy Griffith) won't be able to win the case by dumping sacks of mail to Santa on the judge's desk.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER David Walstad contributed to this report
Happen to catch Kristoff St. John, who plays a young and restless makeup- company executive on the CBS soap The Young and the Restless, yesterday morning on CBS This Morning? If you did, then you noticed that the excited 25-year-old actor even brought along the Emmy he had won the previous night - a gold-leaf statuette with little sharp lightning bolts - for his sit-down with Paula Zahn. He wasn't about to let that thing go. But what you didn't see was what happened afterward.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Steven Spielberg has signed an agreement with Andrew Lloyd Webber to produce an animated screen version of Lloyd Webber's hugely popular musical Cats. It will not be called Paws. Spielberg, who terrified the world 15 years ago with Jaws and launched the most dominant directing career in modern-day Hollywood, is turning into an animal-farm conglomerate. This summer, Spielberg is serving as the producer of Arachnophobia, a horror comedy about a town besieged by poisonous spiders, and he has announced plans to direct Jurassic Park from a forthcoming Michael Crichton novel about dinosaurs revived in our age. Cats won seven Tony Awards and has played in 15 countries since it bowed on the London stage nine years ago. Cats is based on T.S. Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats and seems ideal for animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1987 | By MARILYN BECK, Special to the Daily News
Director Sidney Furie is under the gun to get "Superman IV" in shape to soar into theaters July 17. He reports from London, where he has been on assignment with the project for a year, "We're just doing the music now and starting the sound mixing. And there are a lot of visual effects we'll be working on until the last minute. " There is also a credit to be resolved before the main title designs can be completed. As part of the deal in acquiring rights to "Superman IV: The Quest for Peace" from producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind, Cannon Films agreed that the line "Series created by Alexander Salkind" would be inserted right after the title.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Big news from the Flying Scottoline Ranch. Mother Mary is moving in. Maybe. Rather, she's here, but I'm not sure how long this will last or how it will end. There are two possibilities: Either a shootout at high noon, or we'll just use our bare hands. But I'm getting ahead of myself. I'll tell you how it came about, because, like all disasters, it happened all of sudden. With tornadoes, they say you have only a few seconds before your world turns upside down. I had more notice than that, but even if it happens more slowly, you're still not ready.
SPORTS
September 19, 2008 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
When his swing is right, don't you love watching Ryan Howard hit? As someone said to me recently, the man's numbers are stupid right now. Which is generally a good place for me to start - the stupid part. Not that long ago, there were those among us who delighted in deriding him. We criticized his average and his strikeouts and how he pulls the ball too much. I was a conspirator in that cabal. Maybe you were, too. Now, of course, we show proper respect. We chant "M-V-P" and snarl at the suggestion that someone else should claim the prize.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
If experience is the best teacher, then Sharmain Matlock- Turner is well-prepared for her new post as president and executive director of the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition. The nonprofit coalition provides a vital link between grassroots organizations and public-private sector resources to support programs that solve neighborhood problems. Currently, GPUAC, which has a $20 million budget, is involved in more than 30 programs ranging from voter registration, town watches and homeless services to AIDS services, economic development and jobs programs.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Edward F. Matlock Sr., 82, a highly decorated World War II Army veteran who served in eight military campaigns in Africa and European theaters, died Saturday at home. Mr. Matlock, a Woodbury resident, received two Purple Hearts, a Silver Star and a Bronze Star, and was offered but turned down a battlefield commission as a second lieutenant. He was a technical sergeant with Company D of the 47th Infantry Regiment, Ninth Infantry Division, from 1941 to 1945. When the 47th landed in North Africa, according to a history written by member Bob Dunn, the soldiers "climbed over the sides of their transports under cover of darkness and down rope ladders to landing barges for the trip to shore.
SPORTS
April 28, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Laura Mykytok was unable to watch "Seinfeld" or "Matlock" last night. But she did get to see one entertaining show, and she resisted for a mighty long time any temptation to reach for the clicker. Mykytok, 26, who grew up in Detroit, competed at the University of Florida, lives in Hershey and represents Nike International, last night won the Penn Relays women's Olympic Development 5,000-meter run. Her time was an eye-popping 15 minutes, 17.11 seconds, good enough to break the record for both the event (15:31.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | By Joey Culligan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Disenchanted with the women's basketball program at No. 1 Connecticut, Shea Matlock is sitting out this season after transferring to Georgia Tech in September. "I just didn't fit in with the system at Connecticut," said Matlock, who was The Inquirer's South Jersey girls' basketball player of the year while at Egg Harbor Township in 1993. "I like to run, and Connecticut had a set offense. I got along great with all my teammates, but sometimes I'd play 30 minutes a game and the next game I'd play 30 seconds.
SPORTS
February 28, 1993 | By Tom Williams, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One down, one to go. The Egg Harbor Township girls dominated Middle Township yesterday, 74-30, before more than 1,100 fans at Holy Spirit to win one of the two big games that got away from them last year. The Eagles (22-3), ranked No. 1 in The Inquirer Top 15, became the overall champions of the Cape-Atlantic League. They won the American Conference title; Middle Township (22-3), ranked No. 5, was the National Conference champ. Last year, the two teams met in the CAL's inaugural championship playoff, and Middle was a 56-52 winner.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | By Tom Williams, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Last season, there were only four non-seniors on The Inquirer's all-South Jersey girls' basketball team. Three of them played in the Cape-Atlantic League American Conference. AMERICAN CONFERENCE. A number of players from the American have either committed to college scholarships or are being heavily recruited. Among them is 5-foot-10 Shea Matlock of Egg Harbor Township, who has accepted a four-year scholarship to the University of Connecticut. The Inquirer's player of the year last season, Matlock has scored 1,483 career points and has 467 assists.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER David Walstad contributed to this report
Happen to catch Kristoff St. John, who plays a young and restless makeup- company executive on the CBS soap The Young and the Restless, yesterday morning on CBS This Morning? If you did, then you noticed that the excited 25-year-old actor even brought along the Emmy he had won the previous night - a gold-leaf statuette with little sharp lightning bolts - for his sit-down with Paula Zahn. He wasn't about to let that thing go. But what you didn't see was what happened afterward.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | from David Letterman
TOP GOVERNMENT EUPHEMISMS FOR THE RECESSION (from "Late Night with David Letterman Book of Lists"): Lifestyle downscaling opportunity. Our little problem. The ugly, stupid cousin of robust growth. Something for you '30s nostalgia buffs. Cheap meat-eatin' days. A treat for our bankruptcy lawyer friends. Still a hell of a lot better than any country in South America, pal. The National Bummer. And (drumroll) No. 1 . . . It's Krazy Dollar Days!
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