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Matrix

NEWS
November 5, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"Captain, these lights are crawling with calamari!" Well, that's what it sounded like to me, as a Zion techie toggles monitors at the outset of The Matrix Revolutions, trying to locate Neo, the One, the Saviour, the Keanu, and maybe order some crispy squid ringlets while he's at it. Having deflated and disappointed Matrix fans everywhere - I was one, I swear! - with May's seriously lacking second installment, The Matrix Reloaded, filmmakers Andy and Larry Wachowski deliver the final depressing blow in Revolutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In The Matrix, when Neo, messiah-hero, awakens to the reality that he lives in a computer-programmed illusion, the cyberspace cowboy smashes through the virtual realm to an unfamiliar sphere where he stops time and bends minds, including his own. In The Matrix Reloaded, a sequel so high-powered it should come with a surge protector, Neo (Keanu Reeves) samples the attributes of more familiar old-school superheroes. He scales walls like Spider-Man. He soars above cities like Superman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2003 | By BOB STRAUSS -- Los Angeles Daily News
THE PERSON or the program? This "Matrix"-sounding question often arises during a conversation with Keanu Reeves. The actor plays the central figure, Neo, in Larry and Andy Wachowski's "Matrix" movies, the third and final installment of which, "The Matrix Revolutions," opens worldwide tomorrow. He's an average hacker who's evolved through the trilogy into the superheroic savior of a mankind delusionally enslaved by mechanical masters, via a computer program that makes most humans believe they're actually living in the utterly virtual title world.
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Matrix Reloaded downloaded? X2: X-Men United hijacked? With film piracy increasing exponentially, the studios behind this summer's biggest movies are taking aggressive new steps to combat the sale of counterfeit DVDs and videos in stores and on street corners, and to thwart illegal versions on the Internet. "America's crown jewels - its intellectual property - are being looted," Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Association of America, warned at a congressional hearing on copyright piracy in March.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Kayce T. Ataiyero INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A month after Residents Against Matrix filed an appeal to stop the development of the Octagon Center, the group is preparing for a fight, the developer is preparing to build, and Supervisor Scott Fegley feels that township officials are caught in the middle. "This was never an easy decision. This was not something I voted for because I wanted the type of development they were proposing. But it's legally permitted," he said. "I believed we could have ended up with a worse proposal," Scott said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
X2. T3. LXG. Don't try to rearrange the letters in this alphabet soup to decipher a message. They're Hollywood shorthand for the X-Men sequel (opening Friday), Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (July 2), and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (July 11), films populated by mutants, messiahs and superheroes who covertly propose new ways to interpret religion and reality. Joining the impending onslaught are the seekers in The Matrix Reloaded (May 15), Bruce Almighty (May 23)
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Police from 23 municipalities and two state police barracks were dispatched early Sunday to quell fights outside Club Matrix on Cuthbert Boulevard. The fights began in the back parking lot at 12:45 a.m. when about 800 people were leaving the under-21 club, Capt. Earl P. Coxson said. The Cherry Hill police officers who arrived first were "overwhelmed by the sheer numbers of the combatants" and were unable to disperse them, Coxson said. Police have not determined what led to the fights.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever wash down a tub of popcorn with a bracing can of Red Bull? It was a popular combo at the King of Prussia Stadium 16 earlier this week as an eager crowd, some dressed as hobbits, gathered for Trilogy Tuesday, a marathon showing of all three Lord of the Rings films. Why the Red Bull? However thrilling the adventures of Frodo Baggins and Sam Gamgee may be, when you're parked in a chair for more than 12 hours, you're going to need an occasional pick-me-up. It cost $25 to see J.R.R.
NEWS
June 3, 2003 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christina Crews and her friends had plenty to talk about on their way home from seeing The Matrix Reloaded. They could have debated the worth of the movie's interminable freeway sequence and the Cadillac that wouldn't die. Or questioned why, in the name of Zion, Neo - who, since the original Matrix, has acquired the ability to fly - chose to fight rather than blast past the bad guys who multiply like roaches. Instead, Crews, an African American, marveled over something she had never seen in more than 20 years of moviegoing.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In The Matrix, when Neo, messiah-hero, awakens to the reality that he lives in a computer-programmed illusion, the cyberspace cowboy smashes through the virtual realm to an unfamiliar sphere where he stops time and bends minds, including his own. In The Matrix Reloaded, a sequel so high-powered it should come with a surge protector, Neo (Keanu Reeves) samples the attributes of more familiar old-school superheroes. He scales walls like Spider-Man. He soars above cities like Superman.
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