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Matthew Mcconaughey

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2012 | By Gary Thompson and Daily News Staff Writer
I DON'T KNOW what's gotten into Matthew McConaughey lately, but I'm glad it's in there. The famously laid back actor had gotten a little too laid back in recent years — fully reclined, perhaps half asleep, not terribly "present," as actors like to say. He bounced back last year with "The Lincoln Lawyer," was good again as the exasperated district attorney in Richard Linklater's "Bernie," and in "Magic Mike," more "on" than he'd been in...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
FOR THOSE not hip to L.A. writer Michael Connelly's series of crime books, "The Lincoln Lawyer" refers to a defense attorney who operates out of his limo. The lawyer in question is Mick Haller, who wheels and deals on the freeway as he's ferried to various precinct jails and courtrooms, trying to keep lower-rung biker/dealer clients out of prison. Connelly's lived-in characters have the reportorial feel of observed truth, captured in this gritty adaptation by (Lafayette Hill native)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
"13 Conversations About One Thing" is too busy with philosophical trickery to come out and tell us what that one thing is. Happiness? Fate? Disappointment? Connection? Take your pick; it doesn't seem to matter. Generally overintellectualized (with one sublime exception), the conversations fall from the mouths of mostly disillusioned New Yorkers whose paths cross tangentially. All of them do something they come to regret. A Columbia professor (John Turturro) cheats on his wife (Amy Irving)
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
One decade, this accessory is déclassé, the epitome of corny. Next decade, it's a precious must-have. Really? The trendlet In a nutshell, that's the story of the fanny pack. For some hipsters and high-fashionistas, it's the go-to for holding keys, lipsticks, and oversize smartphones for quick, selfie retrieval. But runners - especially today's Philadelphia Marathoners - rely on the waist pouch to hold tissues, iPods, and energy gels. Where's it come from? Pouches attached to belts go back to medieval times and also were a part of traditional American Indian dress.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The one "thing" in Jill Sprecher's stunning, provocative and meditative Thirteen Conversations About One Thing might be happiness. But it might well be something even more intangible: fate. Looking at this multicharacter film from certain angles, you might say happiness is the impossible goal and fate is the irregular playing field. Set in contemporary Manhattan, Sprecher's film features Alan Arkin (so superb as to inspire awe), Matthew McConaughey, Amy Irving and Clea DuVall as New Yorkers whose lives don't so much intersect as accidentally bump into one another.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
He's a good dad, Mr. Meiks. A widower with two sons, he works hard at the garage in the little Texas town, comes home, and has supper with his boys. He tells them stories and beams love at 'em in ways that seem good and sound and pure. And then one night in Bill Paxton's satisfyingly creepy Frailty, Dad (Paxton, making a deft directorial debut) wakes his kids with an urgent declaration: He's had a vision, he's been chosen by God. There are demons among us and God has appointed him to root them out and smite them down.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Bald and bearded, tattooed and testosteroned, Matthew McConaughey struts into the murk of Reign of Fire chewing a stogie and shouting "Lock and load!" Moving like a cartoon robot (and delivering his lines like one), McConaughey plays a rogue U.S. Army dude named Van Zan - a cocky dragonslayer come to help a commune of weenie Brits cowering in a castle as squadrons of flying beasts exhale napalm on what's left of the world. A clunky conflation of Mad Max post-apocalyptic hysteria and medieval dragon hoo-ha, Reign of Fire begins in present-day London, where construction workers unwittingly unleash winged reptiles from the bowels of the Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The road movie has become a path rutted with familiarity. In taking an elephant walk in Larger Than Life, Bill Murray promises a whole new direction but ends up going pretty much nowhere. Larger Than Life follows in the large footsteps of Operation Dumbo Drop. The Disney comedy, set during the Vietnam War, dropped an elephant in the war zone on the reasonable assumption that after the megatonnage of bombs unloaded by the United States, no one would notice. With Larger Than Life, it would be reasonable to assume that Murray, owner of the deadest pan in the business, could put a little more pep in pachyderm humor than Ray Liotta and Danny Glover managed in Operation Dumbo Drop.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Two New Jersey universities pay their commencement speakers sums much higher than their peers across the region, according to an Inquirer survey. Rutgers University is paying $35,000 to veteran journalist Bill Moyers for speaking at its New Brunswick commencement ceremony May 15. (President Obama, who will be the featured speaker, did not accept the invitation until after Moyers had been announced. He will not be paid.) Kean University's undergraduate and graduate commencement speakers will both be paid $40,000.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
When "The Wedding Planner" opened in Los Angeles earlier this week, party planner to the stars Alyse Sobel watched with all the excitement of a first-time bride about to march down the aisle. Sobel, who coordinated the nuptials of such Hollywood stars as Blair Underwood and Marlee Matlin (not to each other), is the real-life wedding planner upon whom Jennifer Lopez's character is loosely based. The film is about a high-profile wedding planner who has all but given up on love until she meets a pediatrician played by Matthew McConaughey, whose wedding she is coordinating.
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NEWS
May 2, 2016
Two New Jersey universities pay their commencement speakers sums much higher than their peers across the region, according to an Inquirer survey. Rutgers University is paying $35,000 to veteran journalist Bill Moyers for speaking at its New Brunswick commencement ceremony May 15. (President Obama, who will be the featured speaker, did not accept the invitation until after Moyers had been announced. He will not be paid.) Kean University's undergraduate and graduate commencement speakers will both be paid $40,000.
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
One decade, this accessory is déclassé, the epitome of corny. Next decade, it's a precious must-have. Really? The trendlet In a nutshell, that's the story of the fanny pack. For some hipsters and high-fashionistas, it's the go-to for holding keys, lipsticks, and oversize smartphones for quick, selfie retrieval. But runners - especially today's Philadelphia Marathoners - rely on the waist pouch to hold tissues, iPods, and energy gels. Where's it come from? Pouches attached to belts go back to medieval times and also were a part of traditional American Indian dress.
SPORTS
October 7, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WANT TO know the real reason the Eagles lost to the Redskins? Alright, alright, alright, we'll tell you. Actor Matthew McConaughey gave the 'Skins a pregame pep talk before they went out and beat the visiting Birds, 23-20. McConaughey, a friend of Redskins owner Dan Snyder, was in town attending a charity event and staying at the team's hotel when he spoke with the players Saturday night. "It wasn't planned or anything like that," Redskins coach Jay Gruden told reporters yesterday.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
'This is the way we do it," Mission of Burma's Peter Prescott said from his drum kit at Boot & Saddle Thursday. "This is the way we've always done it. And that's all there is to it. " The Boston quartet, whose initial four-year run ended in 1983, are hardly the only band of their era to reunite in the new millennium. Bassist Clint Conley thanked the sold-out audience for choosing them over the Misfits show at the Electric Factory: "We know you have choices in heritage punk acts tonight.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
HBO continues its ownership of Sunday nights. Game of Thrones has wrapped up a particularly gruesome fifth season, and Veep and Silicon Valley similarly said their goodbyes for the year. So HBO is introducing three shows to Sunday audiences. These shows - True Detective (9 p.m.), Ballers (10 p.m.) and The Brink (10:30 p.m.) - are not all that dissimilar from their Sunday time-slot predecessors. As was the case last week, these shows include an epic drama and two comedies - a political satire and one that looks at the daily grind of a much-publicized world.
NEWS
May 15, 2015
"MAD MAX: Fury Road" reminds us that there is nothing filmmakers love more than imagining mankind's destruction, and nothing we love more than watching it. At various times, we've found the end of our world horrifying or funny, or both. Here, in no particular order, are the some of the best apocalypse movies, with an eye to how they've evolved. "La Jetee": French, intellectual, black & white, only 28 minutes long but endlessly influential. The way it combined the apocalypse, time travel and the idea of a man who foresees and shapes his own destiny has been updated by Terry Gilliam as "12 Monkeys," James Cameron in "The Terminator" and even "Looper," in which Bruce Willis replaces the existential poetry of "Jetee" with something more concrete: "I don't want to talk about time travel.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In a world where ties are increasingly optional - much to the chagrin of menswear purists - snazzy neckwear is a sartorial sign that dandyism still exists.   The trendlet Bow ties in polka dots, zigzags, stripes, and African prints are taking the modern man's suited-up look from OK to worthy of a second glance. Just ask Matthew McConaughey.   Where's it come from? With the advent of suiting in the mid-17th century came cravats - a neck band that tucked into men's formal shirts like handkerchiefs.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
FOR SYLVESTER STALLONE , you can go home again. Stallone, back in town after a jaunt to the UK, on Tuesday stopped by the house in Holme Circle where he lived as a teenager with his mom. Stallone is in Philly filming the "Rocky" sequel "Creed," starring Michael B. Jordan as Apollo Creed's son, Adonis. "We were just finishing dinner with my chicken half-consumed and the dishwasher open," said Patty Burke , who lives in Stallone's old haunt with her husband, John . The Burkes' seven kids used that as a point of pride growing up in the house, and Frank Stallone made his own sojourn a couple of years ago. The Burkes bought the house in 1971 from Stallone's mother, Jacqueline, and stepfather, Anthony Filiti . Stallone told Patty Burke that he would like to take a look around the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
I START THIS year-end column the way I usually do: by proclaiming my dislike of best-of lists, which tend to reduce television criticism to numbers. Don't worry, though, there'll be a list. Just no numbers. Taking a page from colleague Gary Thompson , I'm alphabetizing my Top 10 TV shows this year:   THE AMERICANS . FX, 10 p.m. Weds., returns Jan. 28. The stakes got higher than ever this past season for undercover Russian spies Philip and Elizabeth Jennings (Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell)
NEWS
December 22, 2014
A pall hung over the TV bazaar this year. There were passings both major (James Garner, Joan Rivers, Efrem Zimbalist Jr.) and minor (Pugsley from The Addams Family , Reuben from The Partridge Family , the Professor from Gilligan's Island ). The medium's Dowager Countess, Barbara Walters, stepped down from The View . Here Comes Honey Boo Boo was yanked for getting a little too real. And our usual escape outlets - sports and comedy - were denied us. ESPN went OCD, fixating on LeBron James for half the year and Ray Rice for the remainder.
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