CollectionsMatzo
IN THE NEWS

Matzo

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Here are step-by-step instructions for making your own matzo for Passover: 1. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. If you have a pizza stone, place it in the oven while it's preheating. 2. In a large bowl, mix 2 cups of all-purpose flour with 1 cup of water. Add one-half teaspoon of salt, if desired. 3. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon for about a minute, until the flour is incorporated and the dough is elastic. Add more flour if needed; the dough should be a little sticky.
FOOD
March 30, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
Why are matzo balls different from any other Seder food? Matzo balls are different from any other Seder food because other Seder food is made from ingredients. Matzo balls are made from soul and guilt. Matzo balls thrive on adversity, blossom with despair and flourish on tradition, and trying to make a matzo ball from a cookbook recipe is like expecting to get a suntan by reading an Acapulco travel folder. This is why even those men and women whose sponge cakes expand to helium- light excellence, powered solely on beaten egg whites, find their matzo balls collapse into sullen leaden orbs that thud to the bottom of the chicken soup bowl like an exhausted hockey puck.
FOOD
March 27, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
In "Passover Desserts," Penny W. Eisenberg covers the dietary rules and ingredients that are certified kosher or kosher for Passover, which are produced under strict conditions. Many of these ingredients, such as Passover chocolate, matzo cake meal and potato starch, are available at supermarkets. KASHER: Kosher kitchens must be prepared for Passover by removing any trace of hammetz - flour and water that is allowed to rise. This is called kashering. The process may involve bringing out special plates, utensils and cookware that are used only for Passover; covering counters with cloths or paper; and giving sinks, dishwashers and stoves a special cleaning.
FOOD
April 20, 1986 | By Ethel G. Hofman, Special to The Inquirer
When it comes to Passover, there's often a week's eating of kugels, knaidlach and blintzes. There's also a hefty amount of matzo thrown in - sweet with strawberry jam and satin-slathered with butter. This year, the Jewish festival of Passover begins on the evening of April 23 with the seder (ceremonial dinner). All dishes are carefully prepared with foods that are kosher for Passover. Just one mouthful of these festive foods tempts and entices, and, as with any other holiday, we often eat too much.
FOOD
April 9, 1995 | By Lorna Sass, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Passover begins on the eve of April 14, observant Jews will forgo bread in favor of the large, flat, crispy cracker known as matzo. Matzo is a symbolic reminder of those days long ago when the Jews escaped slavery in Egypt, fleeing so quickly that they had no time to let their bread rise. During the eight days of Passover, this Exodus is commemorated by various dietary restrictions and matzo becomes a major player in most diets. As is often the case when freedom prevails, opinions abound, and the unfettered life that matzo represents has fostered a certain amount of controversy.
FOOD
March 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Every culture has culinary rituals to herald the arrival of spring and celebrate the abundance and renewal of the season. For Jews that is the holiday of Passover, also known as the festival of spring, which begins each year with a festive meal on the first full moon following the vernal equinox - March 25 this year. Family and friends gather to read, sing, and eat traditional and symbolic foods to recount the exodus from Egypt, the move from slavery to freedom.
LIVING
April 5, 1987 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Take it off, Vicky," said Marsha Cooperson. "Only boys wear those. " But 4-year-old Vicky Raskovich thought this lavender yarmulke was great. Besides, all the boys were putting them on. And even though she was at the Lubavitcher Center in the Northeast - a visit to the Hasidic center has become something of a pre-Passover tradition for Philadelphia-area youngsters - she wouldn't take it off her head. The Lubavitchers, however, are a decidedly unliberated group whose every action is governed by scrupulous adherence to ancient Jewish law. Men and women don't sit together at synagogue.
FOOD
April 5, 1998 | By Myra Chanin and Ethel G. Hofman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Passover is the time of year Jews reflect on the deliverance of the Israelites from Egyptian bondage. At the first two evening meals - called seders - the Haggadah, the narrative of the Exodus, is read. This year the celebration begins Friday. To prepare for this holiday, the homes of observant Jews are thoroughly cleaned and scoured, to eliminate any vestiges of non-kosher foods. Entirely different sets of dishes, pots and utensils are also required. There are restrictions on what foods may be served during Passover.
FOOD
March 20, 2002 | By Maria Gallagher FOR THE INQUIRER
When Jews share the seder meal during Passover, the eight-day holiday beginning next Wednesday that commemorates their ancestors' escape from slavery in Egypt, most will sit down to the celebration's classic dishes. That means gefilte fish and matzo ball soup, sweet kugel, roast chicken and macaroons for those of Ashkenazic (northern European) descent. In the homes of Sephardic (Mediterranean) Jews, roasted lamb might be the centerpiece, served with rice, chickpeas or lentils. Many modern cooks are looking for ways to lighten the meal's traditional high-fat menu.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / REBECCA BARGER
Making matzo was the lesson of the day for Brittany Green, 5, and her teacher, Karen Gray, of Federation Day Care Services. The two took part in a hands-on matzo-making demonstration at the Philadelphia Lubavitcher Center.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the mark of a well-run kitchen is consistency, then my mother must be doing something right. Her matzo ball soup, just like her mother's and her grandmother's, has been made the same way for decades: with a poached whole chicken breast, halved carrots, and golden bubbles of chicken fat rising to the surface amid bobbing matzo balls, made with the recipe on the back of the Manischewitz box. "I do almost the same thing every time," she told me....
FOOD
March 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Every culture has culinary rituals to herald the arrival of spring and celebrate the abundance and renewal of the season. For Jews that is the holiday of Passover, also known as the festival of spring, which begins each year with a festive meal on the first full moon following the vernal equinox - March 25 this year. Family and friends gather to read, sing, and eat traditional and symbolic foods to recount the exodus from Egypt, the move from slavery to freedom.
NEWS
October 22, 2010
Martin Winit, 92, of Wynnewood, a retired dress manufacturer who was active in Jewish charities, died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday, Oct. 20, at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Winit graduated from Olney High School and then worked as a cutter in the women's garment industry in Philadelphia. During World War II, he served in the 399th Infantry Regiment of the Army's 100th Infantry Division, participating in military demonstrations around the country. He shipped overseas in 1944 and saw action in France and Germany.
NEWS
March 28, 2010 | By Sally Friedman
A brisket the size of Kansas was always lying in a thick gravy. At my grandmother's house, that hefty Passover brisket was somehow synonymous with the Goldene Medina, The Golden Land. America. My grandparents, Gertrude and Joseph Goldberg, were Eastern European immigrants, part of that vast wave that washed on these shores in the early years of the 20th century. They had fled anti-Semitism, grabbing whatever they could carry from the shtetls where they lived. In these frantic departures, many seized even the most humble Sabbath candlesticks, their taproot to Judaism.
FOOD
March 25, 2010
New this year for Passover, which starts at sunset Monday, toffee chocolate-covered matzo by Streit in milk chocolate and dark chocolate with sea salt. Pareve and kosher for Passover. Yum.     Shake, sprinkle and spice Bechara Jaoudeh, a Lebanese transplant in Montgomeryville, Pa. started making Bagel Spice just two months ago. His gourmet blend of onion, garlic, sesame seeds, and other natural spices (but no salt, sugar, MSG, or preservatives) adds an aromatic kick to spreads such as hummus or cream cheese, as well as fried eggs, lox, tuna, even mashed potatoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010
For a recipe that doesn't have a lot of ingredients, there are many variations when it comes to making matzo balls. Here are several to choose from, including one right from the Manischewitz Matzo Meal box. All are served in chicken soup, preferably homemade, so there's a recipe for that, too. Figure on two matzo balls per person served with soup as a first course. Let's begin with a traditional recipe from 1941's "Jewish Home Beautiful," by Betty D. Greenberg and Althea O. Silverman, published by the Women's League of the United Synagogue of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
TURNS OUT, size really does matter. When it comes to matzo balls, that is. Many people have an imprinted memory from their childhood of what a matzo ball should look and taste like, and suggesting a different approach to this traditional Seder fare is akin to heresy. Even though not everybody likes matzo balls - they taste "like mildewed drywall," according to one critic - family memories are what they are, and you shouldn't mess with them. "I'm always in charge of the matzo balls," said Amy Soper, of Palmyra, N.J., who is the family expert on all things dumpling - though she's quick to add that her mom, Irene Goldbloom, taught her everything she knows.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009
4 bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts 2 large onions, peeled and quartered 4 carrots, peeled and each cut into 3 or 4 pieces 1 celery root, peeled and quartered 2 parsnips, peeled and each cut into 3 pieces 5 to 6 celery ribs, each cut into 4 pieces 14 cups water (3 quarts plus 2 cups) 2 teaspoons salt Matzo Balls (recipe below) Place chicken, vegetables and salt in a large pot with 14 cups water. Bring to a boil, skimming any foam that rises to the top. Reduce heat and simmer 2 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Have you ever devoured a bag of "freakies"? Some might call them the misfits, the cast-offs, and the un-round, the misshapen byproducts of a batter hopper at Brown's draining low. But I call them the marvelous mutants of the doughnut world, collectible curlicues of squiggle and crunch that have the fresh crispness I crave, but aren't quite plump enough for the company of a proper dozen. But who needs a proper dozen when a bulging paper bag of these lovable left-asides can be had for just $1 - provided you show up at exactly the right moment, which arrives only once or twice each morning when the bag is full?
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Andrea K. Hammer FOR THE INQUIRER
On New Year's Day, we grab our ice skates and head for Rockefeller Center in New York. We sling the skates over our shoulders, and stuff our pockets with snacks for the day. Part of our glee is beating Amtrak's ransom and taking SEPTA's R7. The adventure involves racing up the steps in Trenton for the soon-departing NJ Transit train to New York. Immersed in reading material, we hit the Big Apple in another hour. As we emerge from Penn Station, the New York pulse makes me feel alive.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|