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Matzo Balls

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010
For a recipe that doesn't have a lot of ingredients, there are many variations when it comes to making matzo balls. Here are several to choose from, including one right from the Manischewitz Matzo Meal box. All are served in chicken soup, preferably homemade, so there's a recipe for that, too. Figure on two matzo balls per person served with soup as a first course. Let's begin with a traditional recipe from 1941's "Jewish Home Beautiful," by Betty D. Greenberg and Althea O. Silverman, published by the Women's League of the United Synagogue of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009
4 bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts 2 large onions, peeled and quartered 4 carrots, peeled and each cut into 3 or 4 pieces 1 celery root, peeled and quartered 2 parsnips, peeled and each cut into 3 pieces 5 to 6 celery ribs, each cut into 4 pieces 14 cups water (3 quarts plus 2 cups) 2 teaspoons salt Matzo Balls (recipe below) Place chicken, vegetables and salt in a large pot with 14 cups water. Bring to a boil, skimming any foam that rises to the top. Reduce heat and simmer 2 hours.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the mark of a well-run kitchen is consistency, then my mother must be doing something right. Her matzo ball soup, just like her mother's and her grandmother's, has been made the same way for decades: with a poached whole chicken breast, halved carrots, and golden bubbles of chicken fat rising to the surface amid bobbing matzo balls, made with the recipe on the back of the Manischewitz box. "I do almost the same thing every time," she told me....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
TURNS OUT, size really does matter. When it comes to matzo balls, that is. Many people have an imprinted memory from their childhood of what a matzo ball should look and taste like, and suggesting a different approach to this traditional Seder fare is akin to heresy. Even though not everybody likes matzo balls - they taste "like mildewed drywall," according to one critic - family memories are what they are, and you shouldn't mess with them. "I'm always in charge of the matzo balls," said Amy Soper, of Palmyra, N.J., who is the family expert on all things dumpling - though she's quick to add that her mom, Irene Goldbloom, taught her everything she knows.
LIVING
December 18, 1994 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Memo to: the fruitcake and fa-la-la crowd. Not all of us are saying ho-ho-ho at this time of year. In fact, the closer a certain holiday gets, the more inclined some of us are to say oy oy oy. Especially on Christmas Eve. All of a sudden, there's no more satisfaction to be gained by watching friends and co-workers drive themselves nuts as they try to finish their Christmas shopping. Their misery is finally over and their fun is beginning. For those who don't celebrate Christmas, the Chinese-food-and-a-movie routine (try to find anywhere else to go on Christmas Eve)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Have you ever devoured a bag of "freakies"? Some might call them the misfits, the cast-offs, and the un-round, the misshapen byproducts of a batter hopper at Brown's draining low. But I call them the marvelous mutants of the doughnut world, collectible curlicues of squiggle and crunch that have the fresh crispness I crave, but aren't quite plump enough for the company of a proper dozen. But who needs a proper dozen when a bulging paper bag of these lovable left-asides can be had for just $1 - provided you show up at exactly the right moment, which arrives only once or twice each morning when the bag is full?
FOOD
April 16, 1997 | by Robert Strauss, For the Daily News
As the typical American family sits around the typical American Passover Seder table, this fearsome thought goes through the mind of every attendee: Are those matzo balls going to be edible? "I've faced that dilemma many times," said bioscience philosopher Arthur L. Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, with an uncomfortable chuckle. "Let's face it, there are many, many nonedible matzo balls. " David Auspitz, owner of the Famous 4th Street Delicatessen, said it's never been a problem for him. "This is a tradition handed down many generations.
NEWS
September 30, 2008 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
My Grandmom Goldberg's Rosh Hashanah matzo balls were virtually inedible. Huge, dense and heavy, they sank into the chicken soup, challenging us to figure out ingenious ways of disposing of them. We grandchildren found our methods. Never mind what they were. As Gertrude Goldberg wore down, as she inevitably did after years of running a mom-and-pop fruit store with my sweet, silent grandfather Joseph, her daughter - my mother - took over the Jewish New Year/Rosh Hashanah holiday meal.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
JANUARY is National Soup Month, and so it is fitting that this month's Daily News Top Cook is celebrated in her family for her homemade chicken soup and matzo balls. Janet Richman of Clementon, N.J., is her family's go-to for the holiday bowl of this traditional Passover fare, but she's learned the value of banking some soup in the freezer for flu season. "A big bowl of soup and salad makes a great meal on a cold winter night, and it's easy to do," she said. The original recipe for Richman's matzo balls came from her mother's cookbook, Five Thousand Years in the Kitchen , produced by the Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood at that Dallas, Texas, synagogue.
FOOD
April 4, 1990 | By Robin Rifkin, Special to the Daily News
The joyous celebration of Passover, when Jews around the world gather to remember the exodus of their ancestors from Egypt, can be harrowing for those concerned with fat and cholesterol. The special foods that play a role in the traditional Passover ceremony - matzo, charoses (a nutty, wine-simmered apple mixture), boiled eggs, horseradish, fresh parsley and plenty of wine - are merely a prelude to the typical rich Passover seder meal. That repast might contain matzo balls heavy with fat and whole eggs, a generously marbled brisket of beef, or a sponge cake made with 8 to 10 whole eggs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the mark of a well-run kitchen is consistency, then my mother must be doing something right. Her matzo ball soup, just like her mother's and her grandmother's, has been made the same way for decades: with a poached whole chicken breast, halved carrots, and golden bubbles of chicken fat rising to the surface amid bobbing matzo balls, made with the recipe on the back of the Manischewitz box. "I do almost the same thing every time," she told me....
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
JANUARY is National Soup Month, and so it is fitting that this month's Daily News Top Cook is celebrated in her family for her homemade chicken soup and matzo balls. Janet Richman of Clementon, N.J., is her family's go-to for the holiday bowl of this traditional Passover fare, but she's learned the value of banking some soup in the freezer for flu season. "A big bowl of soup and salad makes a great meal on a cold winter night, and it's easy to do," she said. The original recipe for Richman's matzo balls came from her mother's cookbook, Five Thousand Years in the Kitchen , produced by the Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood at that Dallas, Texas, synagogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
A brisket the size of Kansas and laced with fat was always lying in a thick gravy. At my grandmother's house, that hefty brisket was synonymous with Rosh Hashanah, just like the weighty matzo balls that never quite floated in Gertrude Goldberg's chicken soup. My sister and I found ingenious ways to dispose of both the brisket and the matzo balls that involved sleight of hand - and napkins. Never mind the details. The gefilte fish was made from live carp kept in Grandmom's bathtub until the moment came for cooking.
FOOD
August 3, 2012
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: It's good to be back home after my annual jaunt to northern Michigan, though I had a number of great meals along the route. Mid-Pennsylvania: Heading west, Brownstone Cafe in Middletown, outside Harrisburg, where Thursday is all-you-can-eat chicken pot pie day - the Pennsylvania Dutch variety, essentially chicken and dumplings. Very good country cooking in a rehabbed bank, but heavy. Returning east, the historic Jean Bonnet Tavern in Bedford, with an excellent selection of Pennsylvania beers and wine, and a tavern menu with local ingredients.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
TURNS OUT, size really does matter. When it comes to matzo balls, that is. Many people have an imprinted memory from their childhood of what a matzo ball should look and taste like, and suggesting a different approach to this traditional Seder fare is akin to heresy. Even though not everybody likes matzo balls - they taste "like mildewed drywall," according to one critic - family memories are what they are, and you shouldn't mess with them. "I'm always in charge of the matzo balls," said Amy Soper, of Palmyra, N.J., who is the family expert on all things dumpling - though she's quick to add that her mom, Irene Goldbloom, taught her everything she knows.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010
For a recipe that doesn't have a lot of ingredients, there are many variations when it comes to making matzo balls. Here are several to choose from, including one right from the Manischewitz Matzo Meal box. All are served in chicken soup, preferably homemade, so there's a recipe for that, too. Figure on two matzo balls per person served with soup as a first course. Let's begin with a traditional recipe from 1941's "Jewish Home Beautiful," by Betty D. Greenberg and Althea O. Silverman, published by the Women's League of the United Synagogue of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009
4 bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts 2 large onions, peeled and quartered 4 carrots, peeled and each cut into 3 or 4 pieces 1 celery root, peeled and quartered 2 parsnips, peeled and each cut into 3 pieces 5 to 6 celery ribs, each cut into 4 pieces 14 cups water (3 quarts plus 2 cups) 2 teaspoons salt Matzo Balls (recipe below) Place chicken, vegetables and salt in a large pot with 14 cups water. Bring to a boil, skimming any foam that rises to the top. Reduce heat and simmer 2 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Have you ever devoured a bag of "freakies"? Some might call them the misfits, the cast-offs, and the un-round, the misshapen byproducts of a batter hopper at Brown's draining low. But I call them the marvelous mutants of the doughnut world, collectible curlicues of squiggle and crunch that have the fresh crispness I crave, but aren't quite plump enough for the company of a proper dozen. But who needs a proper dozen when a bulging paper bag of these lovable left-asides can be had for just $1 - provided you show up at exactly the right moment, which arrives only once or twice each morning when the bag is full?
NEWS
September 30, 2008 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
My Grandmom Goldberg's Rosh Hashanah matzo balls were virtually inedible. Huge, dense and heavy, they sank into the chicken soup, challenging us to figure out ingenious ways of disposing of them. We grandchildren found our methods. Never mind what they were. As Gertrude Goldberg wore down, as she inevitably did after years of running a mom-and-pop fruit store with my sweet, silent grandfather Joseph, her daughter - my mother - took over the Jewish New Year/Rosh Hashanah holiday meal.
FOOD
April 21, 2005 | By Gail Belsky FOR THE INQUIRER
For many years I had my own four questions to ask at Passover: Why is the food so bad? Who needs a holiday with bad food? If we cooked with interesting spices and ingredients would the food taste better? Why don't we try it and see? I am Jewish, so I can say these things (although I would never say them to my mother). Passover is notorious for its bad cuisine. An important holiday on the Jewish calendar, Passover marks the exodus of the Hebrew slaves from Egypt (thanks to Moses)
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