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Maurice Sendak

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 30-plus years, Maurice Sendak has been creating social commentaries and worlds of wonder. In Sendak stories, animals inhabit a little boy's bedroom, a small boy bakes enough cake to feed the world, an unlikely pair raise a homeless child, and a girl saves her sister from goblins. You probably will find a Sendak book in your child's bedroom, unless yours is as big a slob as mine are. They're there somewhere: Where the Wild Things Are, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, and the fairly new We Are All in the Dumps With Jack and Guy. These are definitely not the Berenstain Bears.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new exhibit opening at the Rosenbach Museum & Library next Friday may make it easier for parents to explain war to children in a way that they can really relate to: the art of Maurice Sendak, the noted illustrator of children's books. Titled "Dear Mili: Drawings and Watercolors by Maurice Sendak," the exhibit is based on a story by the 19th-century writer Wilhelm Grimm about a young girl's survival in the woods for 30 years after she is sent there by her widowed mother so that she may escape an approaching war. The exhibit will be on display until April 28. The museum, at 2010 Delancey Place, is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission $1.50 for the exhibit.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
The best dance film ever made is probably Walt Disney's Fantasia. Not a translation of dance from one medium to another, it defined itself on its own terms. Though it uses no dancers and no choreography in the conventional sense of the words, the 1940 film is a genuine dance experience. Its plot, as it were, is like the plot of many contemporary dances: interpretation of music. But in Fantasia, the figures doing the interpretation are animated creatures that can do what live dancers can never do. Through their magical properties, Fantasia establishes a world of pure fantasy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By Molly Eichel, Daily News Staff Writer
CHILDREN'S AUTHOR Maurice Sendak began his life in Brooklyn and lived in Connecticut until his death Tuesday, but his heart — his work — lives on in Philadelphia at the Rosenbach Museum and Library . The museum has more than 10,000 pieces of Sendak's work, spanning his career from the '40s to the early 21st century, and will mount a memorial exhibition in June. Reacting to the beloved author's death, the museum opened its doors for free to the public yesterday and will again Wednesday from noon to 8 p.m. The gallery is exhibiting "From Pen to Publisher: The Life of Three Sendak Picture Books.
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
Early in World War II, an impressionable boy from Brooklyn - one Maurice Sendak - found himself trying to cope with a world gone mad. "Life stood on its head," he said the other day in a phone chat from his home in Connecticut. Sendak began to portray this topsy-turvy world on sketch pads. The pursuit ultimately led to now-celebrated stories such as "In the Night Kitchen" and "Where the Wild Things Are. " Visitors to two Philadelphia attractions, the Please Touch Museum and the Rosenbach Museum, soon will be able to enjoy Sendak's unique artistic vision in exhibitions drawn from his classic children's books.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Max and his toothy monster pals from Where the Wild Things Are were prominently displayed Sunday at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, where a collection of Maurice Sendak's original and finished works could be seen one last day. Within the first hour of the museum's opening, about 25 visitors had crammed into a tiny gallery to say goodbye to 45 ink and watercolor illustrations, a small slice of the 10,000 Sendak pieces the Rosenbach had...
LIVING
April 19, 1995 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maurice Sendak, the author and illustrator of children's books, is a man who deals in images even more than in words. So it is fair to begin with an image: He is sitting in a straight-backed parlor chair in the Four Seasons Hotel in Philadelphia. His breakfast cereal is uneaten, his Evian bottle unopened, and he has a hand on each knee as if set for takeoff. The windows are behind him and he faces an expensive sofa and a Peaceable Kingdom-esque print that bears the biblical admonition: "A little child shall lead them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the poise and the polish of a major world leader, Maurice Sendak was wittily fending off the news media's queries about the Wild Things that inhabit his fantasies and his fiction. Sure, his award-winning picture books are populated by monsters. But they don't frighten Sendak. "I'm so easily scared, if I saw my work as scary, I couldn't go through with it," Sendak said recently. On the other hand, he reminded his interrogators, "children take a great pleasure in being scared.
NEWS
January 2, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The value of 800 rare books at the center of a legal dispute between the executors of Maurice Sendak's will and the Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia is estimated at $1.65 million, according to a figure offered by the Sendak estate in probate court filings. But the Rosenbach, which is suing Sendak's estate, puts the value much higher. The financial report sketches out the scale and value of the collection over which the Rosenbach filed its lawsuit. Sendak's will calls for the Rosenbach to receive all of his rare books, but the Sendak estate has turned over only 349 of the 800 volumes, with that portion valued at $720,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | By John Tierno FOR THE INQUIRER
Wild things, young and old, will be gathering at the Rosenbach Museum and Library on Sunday afternoon for "Let the Wild Rumpus Start!," an exhibition of Maurice Sendak's original drawings from 1963's Where the Wild Things Are. "Sendak used thousands of fine ink lines on fields of colors. The result has an almost fireworks-like look to it," said Derick Dreher, the museum's director. Sendak won't be there in person, but a wild thing named Moishe will make an appearance. (Moishe is the Yiddish equivalent of Maurice.
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NEWS
January 2, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The value of 800 rare books at the center of a legal dispute between the executors of Maurice Sendak's will and the Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia is estimated at $1.65 million, according to a figure offered by the Sendak estate in probate court filings. But the Rosenbach, which is suing Sendak's estate, puts the value much higher. The financial report sketches out the scale and value of the collection over which the Rosenbach filed its lawsuit. Sendak's will calls for the Rosenbach to receive all of his rare books, but the Sendak estate has turned over only 349 of the 800 volumes, with that portion valued at $720,000.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Max and his toothy monster pals from Where the Wild Things Are were prominently displayed Sunday at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, where a collection of Maurice Sendak's original and finished works could be seen one last day. Within the first hour of the museum's opening, about 25 visitors had crammed into a tiny gallery to say goodbye to 45 ink and watercolor illustrations, a small slice of the 10,000 Sendak pieces the Rosenbach had...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
For a rare-book aficionado interested in seeing the tiny handmade dummy books Maurice Sendak fashioned to try out ideas, or for a casual fan curious about the Sendak inside jokes that appeared in early versions of well-known books before disappearing on the way to the publisher, the best place to go for decades has been 2008 Delancey Place in Philadelphia. It has been, in fact, the only place to see a great many specific items that Sendak began placing at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, a treasure house of literary rarities, in 1968.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014
WHO NEEDS to sell CDs and downloads when you can strike gold in a real-estate deal gone bad? The New York Post 's Page Six reports that popstress Rihanna has won a multimillion-dollar settlement after some lousy advice from her former accountant left her with a mere $2 million in cash on hand. Filing suit under her real name, Robyn Fenty, in 2012, the singer claimed that bean counter Peter Gounis and the firm Berdon LLP okeydokey'd her purchase of a $7 million Southern California house despite the fact that she was "bleeding cash" in 2009, the year the deal was closed.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
YOU CAN WALK out of Spike Jonze's man-falls-for-his-computer movie, "Her," unsure whether you've seen a love story, sci-fi creepshow or both.   Jonze, who hates to talk about his own movies, is coy on the subject, and not just with reporters.  Even those who helped design his Golden Globe-nominated new movie were unsure what sort of near-future world Jonze wanted to create.   Case in point: Architect Liz Diller, who helped develop Manhattan's High Line park, whom Jonze sought out when he was putting "Her" together.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Spike Jonze's films to date - Being John Malkovich (1999) and Adaptation (2002), from screenplays by Charlie Kaufman , and Where the Wild Things Are (2009), from the Maurice Sendak classic picture book - are marked by deadpan humor tinged with surreal whimsy. (Next elevator stop: Floor 71/2, where all the workers stoop and hunch over.) But there's an underlying sadness there, too. In Her , which Jonze also wrote and which opens Friday in area theaters, that sadness is palpable.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
By Margot Soven On the wall of my office is a poster of Gatsby - not framed by me, but by my son when he was in high school. A fan of the novel, my son even chose a quote from it to accompany his yearbook photo: "Reserving judgment is a matter of infinite hope. " He's not alone. On the last day of my Introduction to Literature class this month, when I said, "Be sure to see the new Great Gatsby ," one student yelled out, "Oh, that's my favorite book!" When I recently went to see the new Gatsby film, I was prepared for a noisy reception, given that the audience was filled with high school students.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Our losses remind us of all we've had, all the wonderful people who have moved, are moving, and will move among us. So here's a review of our human blessings, lives completed in 2012, lives that will stay with us for thankful years to come. We can't mention all - such are the riches. A local moment. This town and state lost huge names that cast much light. Longtime Penn State football coach Joe Paterno , 85, passed in the midst of scandal. Dick Clark , 82, host of American Bandstand , will see the ball descend this year - but a long way off from Times Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012
Film New this week: Rise of the Guardians (***1/2 out of four stars) Santa, the Tooth Fairy, and the Easter Bunny band together in an enchanting movie that seems as though it were cast by a tag team of Maurice Sendak and Walt Disney. - Carrie Rickey Theater War Horse Nick Stafford's Tony-winning play presents the War to End All Wars from the point of view of a horse named Joey. Clever staging, puppets, and the power of suggestion engage audiences in a play that packs a powerful antiwar message.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
To be honest, it had long been a dream of Rosenbach Museum curator Patrick Rodgers to acquire a copy of Maurice Sendak's In the Night Kitchen with the little Mickey penises cut out. After all, censorship of the book was part of Sendak history, and the Rosenbach houses the author's papers and materials. Who knew that Stephen Colbert would be the one to fulfill that wish? Or that the lure of Colbert's hip and multitudinous audience, not to mention his defining interviews with Sendak only months before the writer's death in May, would lead the Rosenbach to acquire, as a result of a five-minute July 17 segment of The Colbert Report , a tiny and unlikely little piece of hipster cool?
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