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NEWS
June 29, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The best part of waking up just got more expensive. Beginning a costly trend, Procter & Gamble Co., maker of Folgers coffee, said this week that it was raising prices 17 percent - or 35 to 40 cents per 13-ounce can. General Foods, maker of Maxwell House, is doing the same. The reason is a crop-damaging frost in Brazil last weekend. In the two days since the frost, the price of coffee for delivery in July jumped 35 percent, closing at $1.703 a pound yesterday on the New York Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange.
FOOD
November 11, 1992 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Mr. Phipps Tater Crisps. Original, sour cream & onion and barbecue. $2.29 per 5.5- to 5.75-ounce box. Bonnie: Mr. Phipps has followed the success of its pretzel chips with these new potato snack chips. Like Pringles, Tater Crisps are made from dried potatoes and formed into a cracker. But unlike Pringles and regular potato chips, Mr. Phipps Tater Crisps are baked instead of deep fried. That baking process saves a lot of fat calories. A 1-ounce serving of Tater Crisps provides about 120 calories and 4 grams fat, compared to regular potato chips' 170 calories and 9 grams.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Remember the Depression-era hit "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime"? A dime used to buy a cup of coffee. In more recent years, that same cup might have required half-a-buck. Soon it could be 65 cents. That's because the sticker shock striking supermarket shoppers the in the past six weeks in the coffee aisle is spreading to restaurants. Wholesalers say menu coffee prices are going to 65 cents a cup at family- style eating establishments, up from 50 cents. At least one grocer, though, thinks the continued high prices for coffee are unjustified.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Mommy has a new wish. Besides Bradley Cooper. We're talking coffee. And I'm on a quest. I know, some people climb Everest. Others try to cure cancer. But all I want is a delicious cup of coffee that I can make myself, at home. Is that so much to ask? Evidently. Right out front, I have to confess that I love Dunkin' Donuts coffee. Sometimes I'll have Starbucks and other times Wawa, but my coffee soul mate is Dunkin'. We've been together longer than my two marriages combined.
FOOD
March 16, 1994 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Maxwell House Filter Pack Singles. Caffeinated and naturally decaffeinated. $2.69 to $3.19 per 3.6-ounce box of 19 individually wrapped bags. Bonnie: These new filter pack singles from Maxwell House look and are used like a tea bag. Just pour boiling water over the packet, brew for a minute or so, dump the bag and drink. This isn't a new concept; Martinson's and Folger's have introduced similar products in the past few years. Most significant nutritionally is the fact that a cup of coffee made from regular singles has almost twice the caffeine of regular brewed or instant Maxwell House - 110 milligrams per bag instead of about 60. That's because Singles contain concentrated coffee along with the grounds.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton gave journalists attending the annual White House Correspondents Dinner a brief jolt Saturday night when he announced in his best deadpan manner that a balanced-budget deal was imminent. But before anyone abandoned their pricey dinner to run to the phones, the President delivered the punch line - he thanked former senator and presidenital candidate Bob Dole for providing the $56 billion needed. "Miraculously, the $56 billion gap that has separated Democrats and Republicans has been bridged and, ladies and gentlemen, we owe Sen. Dole a huge debt of gratitude," Clinton quipped.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | By Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony F. Raffaele, 74, the former mayor of Sharon Hill who cut hair at the same corner barbershop since the age of 16, died Saturday at his home in Sharon Hill, where he had lived for 58 years. Mr. Raffaele was mayor of Sharon Hill from 1984 to 1988. He was also active in numerous community organizations through the years. He was a self-employed barber for 58 years and owner of the Sharon Hill Barber Shop. His son, Michael, said his father had cut hair for generation after generation of local residents.
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Women have come a long way, baby, except for one thing: Hair. By which I mean, curly or straight? Let me take you back in time, to the Jurassic. By which I mean, 1955. I had curly hair, and not wavy curly. I'm talking majorly curly. I didn't have curls, I had coils. I didn't have naturally curly hair, I had unnaturally curly hair. I had so many curls that once they sprouted from my head, they grew sideways, defying many natural laws, starting with gravity.
FOOD
January 14, 1987 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Philadelphia-area food prices moved up by a modest 0.5 percent over the last month, with the 35 food items in our Market Basket costing $44.49. The increase from January 1985 was a similarly modest 3 percent. Helping to keep costs in line this month were continued sales on beef and a special on whole fryer chickens (49 cents a pound at Pathmark) that should have set stock, stew and soup pots simmering around the city. Several such sales have continued into this week. For instance, Acme is advertising a 49- cents-a-pound price on chicken.
FOOD
April 15, 1987 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Higher prices - or more specifically, a dearth of sale prices - on some meats and produce last week resulted in a whopping 5.6 percent increase in local food costs, according to our monthly Market Basket survey. The cost of our 35-item grocery list rose from $43.39 in March to $45.80 for April as several foods returned to normal, or nearer normal, prices after two months of sharp price-cutting. The April prices also are 5 percent higher than the $43.64 that the same shopping list cost one year ago. Each month, we survey food prices at three local supermarkets representing the leading Philadelphia food retailers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Mommy has a new wish. Besides Bradley Cooper. We're talking coffee. And I'm on a quest. I know, some people climb Everest. Others try to cure cancer. But all I want is a delicious cup of coffee that I can make myself, at home. Is that so much to ask? Evidently. Right out front, I have to confess that I love Dunkin' Donuts coffee. Sometimes I'll have Starbucks and other times Wawa, but my coffee soul mate is Dunkin'. We've been together longer than my two marriages combined.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
OK, WHO WAS Ebenezer Maxwell? Turns out he was a wealthy Philadelphia cloth merchant in the mid-19th century, but his main claim to local fame is the house he built in West Germantown for $10,000. The Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion is a remarkable masonry structure, 2 1/2 stories high with a three-story tower. It's on the National Register of Historic Places. Trouble is, hardly anybody visits it, although it's open to the public as a museum. And over the years, its very existence had been threatened by the nonprofit that manages it. A director once described Ebenezer Maxwell as a "nobody" and the museum as something nobody wanted.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marcia Gay Harden took up a paintbrush Tuesday morning to help refurbish the Community Education Center in Powelton Village. The Mystic River star joined about 40 volunteers as they put the finishing touches on an extensive makeover of the arts center funded by a corporate-sponsored benefit program, "Drops of Good: The Maxwell House Community Project. " "The idea of giving back to the community through support of the arts has always been important for me," Harden said.
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Women have come a long way, baby, except for one thing: Hair. By which I mean, curly or straight? Let me take you back in time, to the Jurassic. By which I mean, 1955. I had curly hair, and not wavy curly. I'm talking majorly curly. I didn't have curls, I had coils. I didn't have naturally curly hair, I had unnaturally curly hair. I had so many curls that once they sprouted from my head, they grew sideways, defying many natural laws, starting with gravity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011 | By BECKY BATCHA, batchab@phillynews.com 215-854-5757
FOR THE FIRST time in 79 years, Maxwell House has updated the text in its Passover Haggadah, a booklet that narrates the story of the Exodus and ranks up there with the poppy-seed bagel as a touchstone of the American Jewish experience. One million copies are printed every year for use around the seder table. In the new telling, according to publisher Elie Rosenfeld, "The Jews end up in Boca. " He's joking. After 5,700-odd years in circulation, the basic narrative of the Jews' escape from bondage in Egypt hasn't changed in any Haggadah that we're aware of, whether it's the gorgeous Elie Wiesel edition, the Zen Santa Cruz Haggadah, the Family Haggadah, the Holistic Haggadah, Sammy Spider's First Haggadah or the new interfaith Haggadah that Cokie Roberts was in Philly to promote last month at the Free Library.
FOOD
March 17, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
If most normal humans are made up of nearly 90 percent water, I am at the very least 80 percent coffee. Not only do I drink it from morning to night, loving the hot black spark perking through my body and mind, I've come to savor its myriad roasty flavors, the manual craft of brewing gear, and especially its culture of rituals - which can be oh-so-hard to change. Like most discerning Philadelphians, my ritual for more than a decade has been a cup of La Colombe, the city's "house brew," judging by the number of restaurants and cafes that have a pot of Corsica or shot of Nizza at the ready.
NEWS
May 13, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not easy to top a gigantic, rolling, orange octopus made out of bicycles that will still fit under the El in Kensington, but Erik Silverson and wife Hedy Sirico are determined. And in this eccentrically gritty neighborhood, where new hipster greets old rowhouse, this is a serious task undertaken in deep secrecy, where on Saturday, in a cobblestone-jarring ride through the streets, they plan to outdo Octavishnu, the celebrated entry from 2008's Kensington Kinetic Sculpture Derby - the ultimate imprint of the newcomers on the old neighborhood.
NEWS
October 28, 2005 | By Mary F. Oves
Suzy Sunshine. That was my name in high school. It sticks even today, although not as consistently. I tend to look at the bright side of things, and even back then, people asked me, "Don't you ever get in a bad mood?" They never understood my cockeyed optimism. And then I met Jake. Eight years ago, I was spotted him while shopping in a sports-equipment store. He was a little thin for my taste, but his infectious grin dared me not to laugh back. I decided to give him a chance.
LIVING
May 4, 1999 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be Juan Valdez to figure out that the specialty-coffee business is as sweet as a double-foam cappuccino dusted with cinnamon sugar. Starbucks dot the urban landscape like coffee beans ripening in the sun, and gas-station convenience stores hawk ready-made lattes right next to the Maxwell House. But to get a real idea of just how hot things have gotten for the folks who serve up $5.4 billion a year in espresso, latte, cappuccino and the rest, you had to be at the Convention Center last weekend.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton gave journalists attending the annual White House Correspondents Dinner a brief jolt Saturday night when he announced in his best deadpan manner that a balanced-budget deal was imminent. But before anyone abandoned their pricey dinner to run to the phones, the President delivered the punch line - he thanked former senator and presidenital candidate Bob Dole for providing the $56 billion needed. "Miraculously, the $56 billion gap that has separated Democrats and Republicans has been bridged and, ladies and gentlemen, we owe Sen. Dole a huge debt of gratitude," Clinton quipped.
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