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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
How do you connect Noam Chomsky, John Lennon and the power of Manhattan in one paragraph? By talking to the The's Matt Johnson about the songwriting on his brusque new record, Nakedself (Nothing), which draws on the blunt obviousness of Lennon's lyricism, the forcefulness of the City That Never Sleeps, and the global consumerist reality of Chomsky. "Foreign policy, globalization, these are things I've been writing about for years," Johnson says from his home in New York. "But hearing Chomsky articulate what I've been feeling, seeing riots in Seattle, the detritus of the World Trade Center bombings - all this made me realize I was onto something.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
When it comes to influences, the enigmatic Clinic manages to invoke everyone and no one. Drawing on obscure psychedelia, Nuggets-style garage rock, Phil Spector's wall of sound, and the Velvet Underground at its most seething, Clinic offers plenty of grist for discerning fans of rock's past. But unlike the Strokes or the White Stripes, this forward-looking Liverpool foursome is after revision, not re-creation. For singer-guitarist Ade Blackburn, much of what is valuable from the past jibes more with the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether speaking from the pulpit of noms de plume Palace, Palace Brothers, Bonnie Prince Billie or himself, Will Oldham has created a world of cubist blues, singing somewhat-askew poetry over dark distant sounds. Since the early '90s, the guitarist/singer has applied a voice that's equal parts lonely-heart yelping and old-coot whimpering to wrinkled Appalachian music. "The microphone is like kissing or body surfing," Oldham says of the distance between mike and mouth. "It is one of the nicest, most symbiotic relations one can ever have.
LIVING
November 5, 1995 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE By Umberto Eco Translated from the Italian by William Weaver Harcourt Brace. 515 pp. $25 As a famously erudite and mischievous Italian professor of semiotics, Umberto Eco demands some latitude as a novelist, which is another way of saying you can't equate him with anyone else. Extravagant with ideas the way big spenders prove wayward with cash, Eco expects people who buy his books to experience the joy of learning - chiefly the joy of absorbing antique arcana - as he does: with the fervor of a religious ecstatic, slightly cooled by modern irony.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Evidence abounds that the Philadelphia indie- rock scene is the picture of good health. The signs: Bands as disparate as the Capitol Years, Bardo Pond, Lilys and the Spinto Band gaining national attention. Park the Van records signing up a trio of Philadelphia bands - Dr. Dog, the Teeth and National Eye - and then packing up and moving from New Orleans to Schwenksville. New venues such as the M Room and Starlight Ballroom popping up for hipsters to hang out in, and cool compilations like last fall's Songs From the 6th Borough offering a Whitman's Sampler of sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, the New York Daily News and USA Today.)
England is abuzz this week over the possibility of another royal wedding now that Prince Andrew's latest flame has shown up twice in public with the royal family. Sarah Ferguson, Princess Diana and little Prince William got a personal tour of the HMS Brazen, the navy ship on which Andrew is serving, on Wednesday in London. Yesterday Ferguson showed up in Switzerland on a ski trip with Diana and Prince Charles. Unlike most of Andrew's past girlfriends (will we ever forget soft-porn movie star Koo Stark?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
As the Mellon Jazz Festival unfolds, its mixed bag of mood-swinging music - cinematic trumpeter Terence Blanchard, honorees "Papa" John & Joey DeFrancesco, Pat Martino - reveals a trick bag within. Space-funk, including Sun Ra's Arkestra and George Clinton's angular R & B, makes Mellon intergalactic. And if space is really the place, singer-pianist Shirley Horn is queen of the galaxy, thanks to her sauntering melody. Horn performs Tuesday - the first night of Mellon, which runs through June 17 - and Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
If Nancy Sinatra continues her collaboration with artists like Morrissey and Jarvis Cocker, perhaps she should look up Holly Golightly. The songs on Holly's latest, "Slowly But Surely," would fit Nancy like a pair of go-go boots - in black. Golightly, who really is named after Audrey Hepburn's character in "Breakfast at Tiffany's," saunters her way through world-weary blues, country and vintage girl group sounding like she's always on her way to Sugar Town - even if it's the Heartbreak Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
If you tried unsuccessfully to see Death From Above 1979 during its packed Vice Records tour at Silk City a month ago, here's your chance again. The Canadian bass-drums duo, who create a heavy-yet-danceable racket, return to Making Time at Transit (9 tonight, 600 Spring Garden St., 215-925-8878, $10 before the band, $8 after, www.igetrvng. com.) Chamber pop ensemble Wayward Wind, which collaborated with the Headlong Dance Theater in "Hotel Pool" at the Live Arts Festival, returns with "Accumulation Process," featuring dancers from Headlong, as well as Jeb Kreager (New Paradise Laboratories)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
'There is no room for folk music in the commercial music business anymore, and I'm doing my best to keep it alive on the Internet, where hopefully these songs will live on," Roger McGuinn says. Along with his band, the Byrds, McGuinn essentially invented the genre of folk-rock in the mid-'60s by electrifying Bob Dylan's acoustic songs with Beatlesque harmony and chiming guitars. He had cut his teeth on folk music, playing with the Limeliters and the Chad Mitchell Trio before forming the Byrds in 1964.
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