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NEWS
December 26, 2003
I have listened as everyone has come down on this principal who used the "N" word in a classroom full of children. This brings to light some things that have bothered me. We hear the word "Nigger" used a great deal and instead of scolding everyone who uses it, only whites who use it are deemed to have a problem. I hope there comes a time when everyone realizes the word nigger is hurtful. Putting it to a catchy tune, or just because the person delivering the message is black doesn't make it any better.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1994 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Roberta Flack sang about someone killing her softly with his song, she may have been thinking about Frankie Beverly. There aren't too many humans as chilled as this Germantown High grad, who wore baseball caps long before they were fly - probably because of his receding hairline. Beverly - who, with his group Maze, finished a two-night stand at the Academy of Music on Monday night - is a bit of an anachronism. He's one of a few traditional soul singers left in black pop, a smooth operator who articulates his lyrics with an unhurried directness and a smooth, midrange tremolo.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | BY LARS-ERIK NELSON
Edward Bosselait was 79 and his brother Albert was 76 when they got laid off the single janitor's job they shared for 22 years at a New Hampshire youth center. They applied for unemployment benefits - and were turned down. Because of their age and their health, they were told, they could not work full time. The law says that to qualify for unemployment benefits, you must be willing to work eight hours a day. "I think it discriminates against the old fellas," the partly blind Edward told an appeals officer.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Except for the intense blue of the sky, the only thing Mike Fournier could see was corn. It surrounded him in a tight wall of stalks, rising above his head and rustling in the breeze, its golden tassels bobbing almost mockingly. Behind Fournier was the narrow path he'd walked in on. Ahead were two paths and a decision: Which way to go? Here on the familiar terrain of Winding Brook Farm in Warrington, he was lost. "Now what do I do?" he said with a laugh. Corn mazes will do that to a person.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Butterflies will find it hard to resist the colorful river of flowers that flows into the newly created meadow maze at Tyler Arboretum. And visitors to Tyler's newest offering will find it difficult to complete the tour without gleaning some insight into native plants and wildlife. The Stopford Family Meadow Maze, which opens tomorrow, features a four-ring labyrinth, the butterfly river, and a series of discovery stations along the maze's perimeter that are designed to educate and entertain visitors.
NEWS
March 27, 1995 | By Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
Sure, getting into an accident with an uninsured driver is a hassle. If you're a typical Philadelphian with car insurance, paying about $1,500 a year, you'll pay about $500 extra for the next three years if your insurance company slaps you with a surcharge as a result of the crash. But this won't necessarily come to pass. For one thing, only a fraction of all collisions involve uninsured drivers. Just 13 percent of the collisions that State Farm's Philadelphia policyholders reported last year, for example, involved uninsured motorists.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After turning a dark corner, Bryan Hazlett took two direct hits to the chest. Momentarily stunned, Hazlett came to a complete stop before running away. He would live to fight another day. Hazlett, 16, was the victim of a laser gun fired by a player at the new Ultrazone center in Bensalem. After his first 15-minute foray into the battle zone, he was eager to return. "This is the best," he said, while removing his battle vest. Before entering into battle, combatants are given a briefing on the importance of both "neutralizing" their enemies and keeping an eye out for snipers.
NEWS
October 26, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Although "peaceful playground" might sound like an oxymoron to recess aides and teachers alike, it was what Marcy Spigler had in mind for the blacktop playgrounds at the eight elementary schools in the Neshaminy School District. The guidance counselor brainstormed with principals and teachers to develop Neshaminy's newly adopted Peaceful Playground Program, which relies on peace mazes to resolve conflicts and cooperative games to avoid them. "When you let 200 students out in the playground with no thought beforehand, they either waste time thinking about what to play, or some get involved in boys-chase-girls, girls-chase-boys games," Spigler said.
NEWS
February 5, 2010
Developers have long complained about the Byzantine permitting process in Philadelphia that costs both time and money, and chases businesses away from the city. A new study commissioned by Mayor Nutter underscores the problem. The study released last week describes the permit process as "incomprehensible. " Despite slight improvements, the system remains essentially broken. For example, processing times in 2008 for such basics as a plumbing permit ranged from more than five months to 1 1/2 years.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From the outside, the building on Garrett Road doesn't look like much. But inside what used to be the Chez Vous Ballroom in Upper Darby sits Val Shively's R & B Records. Music types say Shively's store - with 4 million titles for sale - has the most complete collection of vinyl in the world. No official authority has granted that designation to Shively's store, but there is something to the reputation. Lots of music types - local and international - have wandered through R & B Records in the last 20 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2016 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In its rehearsal spaces and on its main stage, the venerated Walnut Street Theatre currently resembles a jungle gymlike maze of elevated catwalks and open portals - all for Peter and the Starcatcher , which opens Thursday. Peter is such a massive, madly active production that, for the cast to rehearse adequately, a replica of the huge, multilevel, Rube Goldbergian set on the main stage, all ladders, paths, and openings, had to be built in the fourth-floor rehearsal space, for which, in the words of director Bill Van Horn, "rail heights and step lengths were cut in half, to get used to the real estate.
REAL_ESTATE
October 19, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Interior designer Parisa Abdollahi has spent the last 14 months renovating her expansive Tudor in Rydal, with several projects still to complete. One guest room is bare except for a beautiful Persian rug. "If you enter a room with a rug," she says, "you have a place to sit down. A rug warms the room and gives it personality. " Abdollahi, descended from a tribe of fine-rug makers in what is now Iran, owns Parisa Rugs & Décor in the Marketplace Design Center in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2015 | By Howard Gensler, Daily News
"The Maz Runner: The Scorch Trials" edged out "Black Mass" at the box office on the first weekend of the fall movie season. 20th Century Fox's sequel to "The Maze Runner" earned an estimated $30.3 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. Although that came in slightly below the debut of the 2014 young-adult dystopian sci-fi original, it counted as a win for a movie that cost $61 million to make. Warner Bros.' "Black Mass," starring Johnny Depp as Boston gangster Whitey Bulger , premiered with $23.4 million.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Department of Veterans Affairs plans to streamline its tangle of websites and launch a new customer service system, overhauling how veterans interact with the agency. The reorganization, announced on the eve of Veterans Day and touted as the largest in VA history, could come alongside a sweeping round of discipline at the beleaguered agency, in which more than 1,000 employees have been pegged for potential action, according to VA Secretary Robert McDonald. In Philadelphia, where the city's VA hospital and benefits office have been tied to the national scandal over delayed care, veterans and their advocates responded to the announcement with optimism.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It's the only job I ever had," says Eddie Gindi , co-owner of the eight New York-area Century 21 department stores. He is preparing another one for Philadelphia this fall. Scion of a retailing and real estate family, Gindi went to work for his father and uncle - who founded Century 21 - as a student in 1977. "Back then it was just two stores: Brooklyn Bay Ridge and Manhattan," across from the World Trade Center, he said. The store had been there since 1961, even before the towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2013
The Riddle of the Labyrinth The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code By Margalit Fox Ecco Press/HarperCollins. 384 pp. $27.99 Reviewed by Richard Di Dio   If George Smith, the 19th-century Assyriologist, supposedly stripped and ran screaming with excitement through the British Museum upon finally translating the Epic of Gilgamesh , what might happen with a translation exponentially more difficult?...
SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
OVERALL CHAMPION Tina Maze , of Slovenia, beat Mikaela Shiffrin in a World Cup slalom in Ofterschwang, Germany, to overtake the American teenager in the discipline standings and close in on becoming the first woman to win five crystal globes in a season. Maze also got a piece of another record in a season when she has already broken several, equaling Austrian great Hermann Maier's mark of 22 World Cup podiums in 1999-2000. She earlier broke Maier's record for points in a season, and she extended her total to 2,254 with her 10th win. Shiffrin, 17, finished third, giving Maze a seven-point lead in the slalom standings going into Saturday's last race of the season.
SPORTS
March 4, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
WORLD CUP-winning skier Tina Maze was placed under police protection for a super-G race on Sunday after an emailed death threat against her. The Slovenian finished fourth and had two bodyguards close by after the race, won by Anna Fenninger , of Austria, in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. The threat came in an email received Saturday afternoon after Maze won the downhill on the same slope and become the first skier to collect more than 2,000 points in a season. Aksel Lund Svindal won the men's event in Norway to clinch the World Cup super-G title.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard to think of a more shadowy world than the private intelligence industry, which serves as the backdrop to Cinemax's exhilarating espionage thriller Hunted , a BBC co-production from X-Files producer Frank Spotnitz that begins an eight-episode first season at 10 p.m. Friday. It's a realm where spies and special-forces operatives are deployed to gather intelligence about corporations, individuals, or foreign governments - and sell it for a profit. Disturbing ethical questions abound: Should spy companies work for anyone with the money, no matter how questionable their ends?
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
No tiptoeing Saturday-evening spiders had disturbed the dominoes, no rumbling trucks passing in the dark. "Nothing overnight," Steve Perrucci said. "The mice were kind, the spiders. " But early Sunday afternoon, a 2-year-old boy dropped a ball no bigger than a cough drop and knocked over a short line of Perrucci's dominoes. Quickly repaired, the line was made upright. And so at 3 p.m. Sunday, about 100 folks clustered around a maze of, yes, 10,000 dominoes on the third-floor rotunda of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
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