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TRAVEL
August 10, 2014 | By Concha Alborg, For The Inquirer
My father considered himself a Don Juan, although it's questionable if he really was that much of one, since he was married to my mother for almost 35 years and to his third wife for 30 more. But, like the literary Don Juan, my father also redeemed himself from the grave. He died four years ago and I find myself appreciating his most endearing traits. For example, I love to travel and I know it's because when I was a little girl growing up in Madrid, I treasured going with my dad on his Vespa motorcycle to some historic Spanish towns: Toledo, Segovia, Ávila, Salamanca.
FOOD
April 25, 1990 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
In our ever-changing culture, with its constantly adapting language, some words and phrases come to assume lives of their own, to convey a feeling or idea rather than any exact meaning. Sunday dinner is one example, in that it conjures up a vision of a special meal for any time, not one that's limited to a Sunday. And it perfectly describes this month's menu for Affordable Feast, which is luxurious, delicious and festive. All ingredients are available in local supermarkets, preparation is guaranteed not to stress the cook, and results are sure to please everyone.
FOOD
September 14, 1986 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
At a dinner visit to Michael's, we could have wished for company. With just two other tables of diners and a few stragglers at the bar, the white-walled, long, narrow dining room of the new Chestnut Street restaurant seemed cold and lonely. But what a difference the time of day makes. At noon, a few days later, Michael's business was booming, and the noise from the piano and the crowd crammed in around us made for a party atmosphere in the long, high-ceilinged room. The booming lunch business should have come as no surprise.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
They were there to feed the hungry, and nobody came. Or very few, anyway. Four people eating tuna casserole recently at the Church of the Holy Trinity in West Chester were outnumbered by about a dozen volunteers. Yet those who came to eat were happy for the warm food and kind attention. "I remember having to go to assistance in 1980, and I was humiliated," said Sarah Fagan, 52, who was eating dinner with her friend, Catherine Dulin, 65. "But in West Chester, they are a respecter of persons.
FOOD
January 23, 1991 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
MY OWN MEALS. My Kind of Chicken, Chicken Please, My Favorite Pasta, My Turkey Meatballs, and My Meatballs and Shells. $1.99 to $2.49 per 8- to 8.5- ounce shelf-stable pouch. BONNIE: My Own Meals is the healthiest of the new meals made especially for kids. All the entrees are made without artificial colors or flavors, preservatives or additives. Each of the five shelf-stable entrees is moderate in sodium, fat and calories. The fat ranges from 16 percent of calories (Chicken Please)
FOOD
June 29, 1988 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
There was a time when proper American meals were always hot meals, no matter what the temperature in the yard, in the kitchen or at the dining table. Consequently, summer eating often was a chore for everyone, particularly for the cook. Thankfully, that time is just a memory. And thankfully, too, our concept of cold food has progressed from simple deli cold cuts and potato salad to meals that have excellent nutritional as well as aesthetic appeal. In the process, an entirely new hot-weather cuisine consisting of good food, easy on bulk and heat, has been created.
FOOD
January 30, 1991 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
If there is anything good to be said about winter, particularly when it's bitter cold, snowing and generally miserable, it's that it makes being at home seem so nice. There are shelter and warmth there, and there is comfort to be found, especially when everybody's favorite room, the kitchen, is giving off tantalizing smells. Aroma, in fact, is one of the key elements in the four-person, garlicky, Italian feast we offer this month. It contains luxury ingredients, hearty pasta and Mediterranean touches in easy-to-fix dishes, with nearly all shopping done in local supermarkets.
FOOD
May 2, 1993 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Restaurant reviewers worry about being recognized. So when our lunch server at Rembrandt's said, "Don't I know you . . .," I began to cringe - before I realized that she was talking to my review partner, Channel 17 interviewer Dorie Lenz. It was Lenz's first visit to the Art Museum-area restaurant. I'm betting it won't be the last. Her entree, we agreed, was a light, healthful combination in which each ingredient had been given careful attention. The entree's base was angel-hair pasta.
FOOD
May 23, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Every so often, you stumble on a recipe with a technique so brilliant, so obvious, and so winning that you wonder why you don't cook every single meal this way. Such is the case with the one-tray meal, my most recent kitchen obsession. Not to be confused with one-pot stews or skillet bakes, or that covered standby of community cookbooks, the one-tray meal is something altogether more elegant by design, and arguably even simpler to make: a combination of protein, starch, and vegetables, scattered evenly across a half-sheet pan and roasted in the oven.
FOOD
February 9, 2000 | by Jaclyn D'Auria, For the Daily News
If you're into extra-special and extra-extra-special Valentine's Day dinners - as in extra work and fantasy menus - you'll appreciate the following suggestions from a few local chefs. Their versions of romantic food are sure to spark your own imagination. Most of these professional chefs won't be brewing their aphrodisiac love potions on Valentine's Day - because they'll be working. But that won't stop any of them from whipping up mouth-watering meals on their days off. How do the pros define a romantic meal?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2014
NEVER TRUST a skinny chef. Nor one with a spotless apron. I trust Walter Staib, built like a Black Forest barrel with a winter-frost Vandyke. In a world crawling with skinny chefs, Iron Chefs and nuisance chefs, give me Walter. "I don't have tattoos, I haven't been in jail, I'm an ordinary guy," he says. This ordinary guy has published six cookbooks, his PBS "A Taste of History" series snagged four Emmys in five seasons, he's a mega-consultant who has launched 650 restaurants around the globe.
TRAVEL
August 10, 2014 | By Concha Alborg, For The Inquirer
My father considered himself a Don Juan, although it's questionable if he really was that much of one, since he was married to my mother for almost 35 years and to his third wife for 30 more. But, like the literary Don Juan, my father also redeemed himself from the grave. He died four years ago and I find myself appreciating his most endearing traits. For example, I love to travel and I know it's because when I was a little girl growing up in Madrid, I treasured going with my dad on his Vespa motorcycle to some historic Spanish towns: Toledo, Segovia, Ávila, Salamanca.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
L EE WALLACH, 28, of Center City, is the chef and owner of the meal-delivery startup Home Appetit. Wallach worked behind the stoves of eateries in the Napa Valley and New York City before coming to Philadelphia. He rents the kitchen at the Farm and Fisherman, on Pine Street near 11th, where he prepares meals for delivery . Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Home Appetit? A: I moved to Philadelphia and started a personal-chef business in late 2012 and went to people's homes and prepared meals for the week.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh and Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Gigi was 5, her mother, Sarah Eisenstein, was getting worried. A big child - born at 10 pounds, 13 ounces - Gigi was gaining weight, as the family dined on hot dogs and ate chips as a snack. Now, Eisenstein cooks eggplant and zucchini fries for Gigi and sister Isabella. Their mother learned these skills at Cooking with Friends, a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia program. Gigi, 8, tall for her age, is at a healthy weight. The program that helped Eisenstein will expand into a community-based study, thanks to a new partnership between Children's and the food service company Aramark, announced Wednesday at the Enterprise Center in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania House unanimously passed a bill this week extending insurance coverage of amino-acid-based liquid nutrition formulas to children with severe food allergies. The sponsor, Rep. Daniel Truitt (R., Chester), said he hoped for Senate passage in the fall. An estimated 450 infants and children in Pennsylvania cannot eat conventional foods because of food-protein allergies. They require the elemental liquid formulas, which must be prescribed by a physician and cost about $5,000 a year.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215caro-854-5938
BISHOP Thomas Martin, 78, starts his Tuesdays before 5 a.m. on a mission: prepare meals for 200 or more people at a North Philadelphia church - sometimes by himself. "I get tired," admitted Martin, of Elkins Park. "But it's a mission, and in a mission you get strength. " For about 15 years, Martin has helped run Mount Olive Holy Temple's feeding program, a sit-down meal from noon to about 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the church on Broad Street near Jefferson. The goal is to provide a hearty meal to homeless and low-income folks who come from across the city.
FOOD
June 27, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
For a cook on the line, climbing up the career ladder of the brigade de cuisine is no easy feat - especially when the daily grind is often a single repetitive task amid a boisterous jumble of noise and heat. But there's a moment, at least once a day, when self-expression is encouraged and ingenuity is rewarded: staff meal. "You're working hard and learning everything that you can learn, and hoping that eventually you'll get the chance to do something so the chefs will take notice," says Pub & Kitchen executive chef Eli Collins, who worked as a line cook in multiple restaurants in Philadelphia before moving up to the sous chef position at Daniel Boulud's DBGB Kitchen and Bar in New York.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
SUMMER has arrived, but hunger doesn't take a vacation. For too many students, the lunch they receive at school is their only meal. And during the summer, many of these young people lose access to regular meals. To address summer food insecurity, the city of Philadelphia provides free, healthy meals to eligible Philadelphians through the summer meals program, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture, the Pennsylvania Department of Education and local partners. Beginning this week, more than 700 summer-meal locations will open citywide, serving delicious and healthy breakfast, lunch and snacks to young Philadelphians.
FOOD
May 23, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Every so often, you stumble on a recipe with a technique so brilliant, so obvious, and so winning that you wonder why you don't cook every single meal this way. Such is the case with the one-tray meal, my most recent kitchen obsession. Not to be confused with one-pot stews or skillet bakes, or that covered standby of community cookbooks, the one-tray meal is something altogether more elegant by design, and arguably even simpler to make: a combination of protein, starch, and vegetables, scattered evenly across a half-sheet pan and roasted in the oven.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Under a mural of smiling children, local organizations and government agencies tasked with feeding hungry children gathered Monday to talk about the time of year when little stomachs typically grumble the loudest: summer. The roundtable in Camden's City Council chambers brought together New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher and Audrey Rowe, administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Nutrition and Consumer Service, for a discussion on ways to raise participation in the federally funded Summer Food Service Program.
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