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FOOD
April 25, 1990 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
In our ever-changing culture, with its constantly adapting language, some words and phrases come to assume lives of their own, to convey a feeling or idea rather than any exact meaning. Sunday dinner is one example, in that it conjures up a vision of a special meal for any time, not one that's limited to a Sunday. And it perfectly describes this month's menu for Affordable Feast, which is luxurious, delicious and festive. All ingredients are available in local supermarkets, preparation is guaranteed not to stress the cook, and results are sure to please everyone.
FOOD
September 14, 1986 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
At a dinner visit to Michael's, we could have wished for company. With just two other tables of diners and a few stragglers at the bar, the white-walled, long, narrow dining room of the new Chestnut Street restaurant seemed cold and lonely. But what a difference the time of day makes. At noon, a few days later, Michael's business was booming, and the noise from the piano and the crowd crammed in around us made for a party atmosphere in the long, high-ceilinged room. The booming lunch business should have come as no surprise.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
They were there to feed the hungry, and nobody came. Or very few, anyway. Four people eating tuna casserole recently at the Church of the Holy Trinity in West Chester were outnumbered by about a dozen volunteers. Yet those who came to eat were happy for the warm food and kind attention. "I remember having to go to assistance in 1980, and I was humiliated," said Sarah Fagan, 52, who was eating dinner with her friend, Catherine Dulin, 65. "But in West Chester, they are a respecter of persons.
FOOD
January 23, 1991 | By Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
MY OWN MEALS. My Kind of Chicken, Chicken Please, My Favorite Pasta, My Turkey Meatballs, and My Meatballs and Shells. $1.99 to $2.49 per 8- to 8.5- ounce shelf-stable pouch. BONNIE: My Own Meals is the healthiest of the new meals made especially for kids. All the entrees are made without artificial colors or flavors, preservatives or additives. Each of the five shelf-stable entrees is moderate in sodium, fat and calories. The fat ranges from 16 percent of calories (Chicken Please)
FOOD
June 29, 1988 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
There was a time when proper American meals were always hot meals, no matter what the temperature in the yard, in the kitchen or at the dining table. Consequently, summer eating often was a chore for everyone, particularly for the cook. Thankfully, that time is just a memory. And thankfully, too, our concept of cold food has progressed from simple deli cold cuts and potato salad to meals that have excellent nutritional as well as aesthetic appeal. In the process, an entirely new hot-weather cuisine consisting of good food, easy on bulk and heat, has been created.
FOOD
January 30, 1991 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
If there is anything good to be said about winter, particularly when it's bitter cold, snowing and generally miserable, it's that it makes being at home seem so nice. There are shelter and warmth there, and there is comfort to be found, especially when everybody's favorite room, the kitchen, is giving off tantalizing smells. Aroma, in fact, is one of the key elements in the four-person, garlicky, Italian feast we offer this month. It contains luxury ingredients, hearty pasta and Mediterranean touches in easy-to-fix dishes, with nearly all shopping done in local supermarkets.
FOOD
May 2, 1993 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Restaurant reviewers worry about being recognized. So when our lunch server at Rembrandt's said, "Don't I know you . . .," I began to cringe - before I realized that she was talking to my review partner, Channel 17 interviewer Dorie Lenz. It was Lenz's first visit to the Art Museum-area restaurant. I'm betting it won't be the last. Her entree, we agreed, was a light, healthful combination in which each ingredient had been given careful attention. The entree's base was angel-hair pasta.
FOOD
May 23, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Every so often, you stumble on a recipe with a technique so brilliant, so obvious, and so winning that you wonder why you don't cook every single meal this way. Such is the case with the one-tray meal, my most recent kitchen obsession. Not to be confused with one-pot stews or skillet bakes, or that covered standby of community cookbooks, the one-tray meal is something altogether more elegant by design, and arguably even simpler to make: a combination of protein, starch, and vegetables, scattered evenly across a half-sheet pan and roasted in the oven.
FOOD
February 9, 2000 | by Jaclyn D'Auria, For the Daily News
If you're into extra-special and extra-extra-special Valentine's Day dinners - as in extra work and fantasy menus - you'll appreciate the following suggestions from a few local chefs. Their versions of romantic food are sure to spark your own imagination. Most of these professional chefs won't be brewing their aphrodisiac love potions on Valentine's Day - because they'll be working. But that won't stop any of them from whipping up mouth-watering meals on their days off. How do the pros define a romantic meal?
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215caro-854-5938
BISHOP Thomas Martin, 78, starts his Tuesdays before 5 a.m. on a mission: prepare meals for 200 or more people at a North Philadelphia church - sometimes by himself. "I get tired," admitted Martin, of Elkins Park. "But it's a mission, and in a mission you get strength. " For about 15 years, Martin has helped run Mount Olive Holy Temple's feeding program, a sit-down meal from noon to about 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the church on Broad Street near Jefferson. The goal is to provide a hearty meal to homeless and low-income folks who come from across the city.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On Jan. 4, the day of Mayor Kenney's inauguration and the first frigid, Code Blue day of the winter, more than 100 people lined up on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in search of a hot meal. Adam Bruckner, whose nonprofit Philly Restart was running the makeshift dinner service, tucked his hands under his jacket to warm them. Weather like this brings out only the neediest, he said. "No one's faking being hungry out here today. These are truly desperate people. " It's hard to deny that.
FOOD
January 15, 2016 | Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
These days, if you want to impress your food-obsessed friends from New York with the culinary prowess of Philadelphia, you'd have no trouble dropping five figures on a ridiculously elaborate dinner at any one of this city's fine restaurants. But you might be surprised to hear that same boast was made by a group of well-to-do food enthusiasts from Philadelphia in 1851, and the bill from the resulting meal was in the same ballpark: between $1,000 and $1,500 (or between $29,000 and $47,000 today, depending on how inflation is calculated)
FOOD
December 25, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
There is absolutely no reason (short of a doctor's warning) why you can't indulge all day long on Christmas. But for those with young children, gigantic gatherings, and/or multiple households to visit on a single day of celebrating, starting out with a sugar and fat blitz might be less than optimal. You need your energy, after all, for toy assemblage, chitchat with relatives, and daytime drinking - not to mention for enjoying all the other delicious treats to come. On the other hand, no one wants to serve dry toast or egg whites from a carton on Christmas morning.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
MANNA, a nonprofit founded in 1990 to provide meals to those with HIV/AIDS, has been serving people with other illnesses for nearly a decade. But to do so, it had to depend on philanthropy - until this year, when MANNA struck a deal with Health Partners Plans Inc. to provide meals to diabetics who are members of Health Partners' Medicaid program. For MANNA, it's a big deal, the first time it has tapped insurance dollars. "Nobody had ever figured out how to pay for this service," said Susan Daugherty, a registered dietitian and chief executive of MANNA (Metropolitan Area Neighborhood Nutrition Alliance)
FOOD
October 30, 2015
Sacred Heart We were met with smiles, energy, and enthusiasm, along with questions about what we were going to cook today. "I want an important job," Tierrell Perry announced. Cutting various vegetables for the pasta dish and a salad did not meet his criteria for said "important job," but after a demonstration of smashing garlic, he beamed. "That's the job for me!" - Sylvia Wilson and Ruth Biemer Bayard Taylor The little chefs couldn't wait to whip up such a foreign dish.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Leave it to a Canadian to put a positive spin on SNAP (a.k.a. food stamps), a program whose ungainly full name is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program . "We don't have food stamps in Canada. A lot of Americans don't appreciate that the program is actually really cool and effective," says Leanne Brown , author of Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4 a Day (Workman). She'll discuss the book and sign copies Tuesday, Oct. 27 at the Free Library of Philadelphia . The book has become an unlikely phenomenon, and the interest in it started before it was officially published in July.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
POPE FRANCIS may be one of the holiest men on the planet, but when he tastes the new flavor of ice cream that the dapper brothers over at the Franklin Fountain were asked to create for his meal at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary this weekend, he'll sure feel sinful. Brothers Ryan and Eric Berley, who have owned the ever-popular Old City ice-cream-and-soda shop on Market Street near Letitia for 11 years, concocted their new flavor, "caramelized banana," specifically to meet the sweet tastes of this sweet pope.
NEWS
August 28, 2015
D EAR ABBY: My wife and I have been married 22 years, and we had a good marriage until recently. Over the last three years she has become more and more consumed with her phone and tablet. She goes nowhere and does nothing without them. Every night and weekend she sits engrossed in both devices until well after I have gone to bed. If I ask what she's doing or who she's texting, she accuses me of being controlling and not trusting her. We can't watch a movie, eat a meal (out or at home)
FOOD
August 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey A. Miller caters 400 weddings a year at venues around the city. This month, one particular dinner demanded an inordinate amount of his attention. "I'm not usually picking the food, too," he explained. Yet there he was at 8 a.m. at Awbury Arboretum in Germantown, helping staffers unload plastic buckets to fill with water to preserve fresh-picked greens, flowers, and branches. It was in preparation for an event that was part social affair, part fund-raiser, and part proof of concept: a foraging walk and five-course dinner based on wild plants foraged from Awbury's grounds.
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