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FOOD
March 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The next big show at the Kimmel Center is going to be one of its most expensive tickets: dinner. The performers? Celebrity Iron Chef Jose Garces and his team. The set? Volvér, a much-awaited jewel box dining room in the Kimmel Center. And not only will its tasting menus instantly become the city's priciest meal, with food alone fluctuating between $150 and $250, it will also become Philly's first restaurant to sell those seats online as a "ticketed experience," prepaid and nonrefundable.
FOOD
February 14, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Along with the drugstores' heart-shaped boxes, they should probably offer free first-aid kits on Valentine's Day, because no other holiday inspires so much well-meaning, overambitious, and underexperienced cooking. Still, if it doesn't send involved parties to the emergency room, the right home-cooked meal could be an important turning point in a relationship, the moment of dawning realization that this thing could actually last. Food legend is filled with such recipes - engagement chicken and marry-me lasagna and kiss-me kugel - dishes that are supposedly so delicious that they inspire proposals or at least romantic escalation.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
"IS IT real?" That's the key question for any dietary change adopted in January. It's easy on New Year's Eve to foresee a year of healthful eating, but a week or two in, the pie in the sky may become a pie in the face as aspirations give way to realities. A local meal service aims to help you make real changes around food - to the point of being named Real Food Works. Founded by entrepreneur Lucinda Duncalfe, in 2012, RFW moved into Philadelphia proper (Juniper Street) this past fall, launching with an event that saw Mayor Nutter gulping down a celebratory green smoothie.
FOOD
January 3, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1978, at the height of the Crock-Pot fad, Phyllis Pellman Good received one as a gift. "Here," said the neighbor who bestowed it, "you need this. " Good was a working mother of two small girls and, while husband Merle was great at cleaning up, the cooking fell to her. No stranger to the kitchen, she and her husband were founders of Good Books, the Intercourse, Pa., publisher that specializes in cookbooks and other works about Amish and Mennonite life, and she already had several titles under her belt and a local following.
NEWS
January 1, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The decorators at the Union League were hanging gold drapes Monday afternoon. The cooks downstairs were poaching 150 lobsters. Up the street, the staff at the Ritz-Carlton 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge were polishing champagne flutes and laying in bottles of the bubbly by the hundred. And by Tuesday morning, another dining room on South Broad Street will fill with the aroma of turkey sausage and buttermilk biscuits, made from scratch, and offer New Year's Eve breakfast to a few hundred guests on a budget.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Steve and Mia
Q: If I invite a man over to my place and cook dinner for him, why does he automatically assume it means I want to sleep with him? After this happened several times, I stopped doing it. I really enjoy cooking and sharing food ideas, but for some reason men I date leap to the wrong conclusions. Any solutions? Steve: You're not adding granulated Viagra to the food, are you? I don't think it's your kitchen that's leading him to your bedroom. At some point in a new relationship, every man assumes the woman wants to bed him, because who wouldn't?
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the shadow of City Hall and the company of 900 fellow dinner guests, Caleb Karlen, 11, sampled the Waltham butternut squash caponata. "Delicious," the sixth grader at Penn Alexander said as he went back for a second forkful at "70x7 The Meal act XXXIV". Caleb, whose mother, Ann, is executive director of Fair Food, is no stranger to heirloom produce. He not only kept up with conversation about food access and healthy eating, he taught fellow diners a few things. The meal, commissioned by the Mural Arts Program to kick off its 30th anniversary, ends the "What We Sow" project, launched in June with the goal of provoking conversations about the politics of food production and healthy eating.
FOOD
September 27, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
As the leisurely rhythms of summer give way to the more frantic routines of fall, those responsible for feeding a family have the challenge of navigating mealtimes around multiple schedules. I have always felt, and research bears out, that sitting down to eat, even for a few minutes, is better than eating in front of the fridge, or in the backseat of the car. Sit-down meals with others promote better eating habits, better relationships, and even better grades. So how can a busy family manage to eat healthy home-cooked meals here in the real world of competing priorities and overfilled schedules?
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
IT'S A parental terror about as universal as stepping on a Lego barefoot: packing kids' lunches for school and day care. This month's Top Cook, Anita Garimella Andrews, has faced and conquered it. She had to. Because of the family's schedule, she packs three meals a day and two snacks for her 16-month-old daughter, Sanaa. "I think moms who have children who go to day care have similar things to think about as those of school-aged children," said Andrews. "What can I pack that's easy to do, healthful, will go over well and minimize mess?"
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Life may get harsher and hungrier for nearly three million people in Pennsylvania and New Jersey on Nov. 1, when food-stamp benefits will be cut overnight for the first time in U.S. history. It will mean 21 lost meals per month for a family of four - devastating arithmetic for families already living either on the edge or within the abyss of poverty, according to experts on food stamps, now called SNAP for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Why now? The federal stimulus of 2009 had temporarily boosted SNAP benefits to combat the recession.
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