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Meal

TRAVEL
October 14, 2012 | By Adrian Sainz, Associated Press
HENDERSON, Ky. - The churning red paddle wheel propels the pearl-white steamboat along the wide Mississippi River like a slow-moving time machine, through a slice of Americana that harks back to Mark Twain and the history, culture, and commerce of the 19th century. Inside the six-level steamboat, passengers enjoy tea time in the ladies' parlor, rousing musical shows in the Grand Saloon, lessons on river history, and four-course meals in an antebellum-style dining room. With the relaunching of a vessel called the American Queen, steamboat travel has returned to the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers for the first time since 2008.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
DEERFIELD BEACH, FLA. - The winner of a roach-eating contest in South Florida died shortly after downing dozens of the live bugs, as well as worms, authorities said. The grand prize in Friday night's contest was a live python. The Broward County Sheriff's Office said in a news release that it is waiting for an autopsy to give the official cause of death. However, a news release on Monday said that 32-year-old Edward Archbold became ill soon after winning and collapsed in front of the Ben Siegel Reptile Store, where the contest was held.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question : Can someone actually die from eating too much food at one time, like from one of those eating contests or with bulimia?   Answer : While the stretched stomach won't explode, it's still possible for a person to die from eating a massive meal. Notable examples of that include King Adolph of Sweden, who died in 1771 after consuming a massive meal of lobster, caviar, sauerkraut, smoked herring, champagne, and 14 servings of dessert in hot milk; a 25-year-old Marine who died in 1983 after a doughnut speed-eating contest; and a 22-year-old Hungarian woman who died in 2006 after eating so much that her massively distended stomach compressed her aorta and femoral arteries, sending her into shock.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey saw a 21 percent rise in the number of low-income students who get school breakfasts, but it still lags far behind most other states, a report released Tuesday found. In South Jersey, seven charter schools or districts were among 64 high-poverty districts statewide where less than 31 percent of eligible students receive subsidized school breakfasts, according to the study by Advocates for Children of New Jersey, a nonprofit child research and action organization. On the plus side locally, the Woodlynne school district and Camden's Promise Charter School, both in Camden County, were two of 13 schools listed last year that worked their way off this year.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter and religious groups that distribute free outdoor meals to the poor have reached a truce, agreeing to temporarily step away from litigation in order to address larger issues surrounding the problems of hunger and homelessness. The interim agreement was signed Thursday by U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. It put on hold a federal complaint filed last June by faith-based groups arguing that the city's ban on serving outdoor meals in parks violated the exercise of their religious beliefs.
FOOD
September 14, 2012 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
We've all been there. Lectured about "how it works here," and how wonderful the chef is and what great reviews he's gotten - all before there's so much as a glass of water on the table. We've endured the shameless up-sell of side dishes and desserts when everyone has already ordered quite enough food, thank you very much. Or watched, stunned, as the server brings the meal then lingers awkwardly, murmuring, "Wow, that looks really good, doesn't it? I'm so hungry. " The point is, service is at the heart of the restaurant experience.
FOOD
August 23, 2012 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
I don't know whether this is a tale about the glories of pesto or one of faulty memory. With summery basil pesto on my mind, and the desire to do something other than dressing pasta, I recalled a favorite dish from the famed Zingerman's Delicatessen in Ann Arbor, Mich. It was a cold chicken, pesto, and fresh tomato salad, the alchemy achieving greatness beyond the simple ingredients. But I couldn't remember: Did it have walnuts too? Or another something? It was years ago, nearly 20, so memory failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012
WHAT'S a local who sticks around the sticky city to do if he or she is jonesing for a fancy meal? Sit outside: Pick a place with sidewalk tables, which typically aren't reserved. "If outdoor seating is there, the wait is never that long," said Val Safran, co-owner of Lolita, Barbuzzo and Jamoner. Go early - or late: "In Philadelphia, everybody likes to eat between 6:30 and 8, so if you're flexible, you can always get in," said Yin. Keep at it: OpenTable's Scott Jampol keeps tabs on summertime business.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
"What exactly are we making here?" asked my son Tim as the blender whirred with liquid neon. "It looks like green sludge. " "It's Petits Pois Sauce, a lovely springtime accompaniment made with, well, little peas," I told him. "It's French. " We had only just begun the cooking endeavor: teaching my kids a recipe they could prepare on Mother's Day. And already I was getting, shall we say, gentle resistance. "Who do you think is going to eat this stuff, really, Mom?" he continued.
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