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FOOD
March 22, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
An excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " From the first time I discovered it in the south of France, Salade Nicoise has held favored-nation status in my world of salads. My first encounter, as a 20-year-old college student traveling abroad, was an introduction met with sheer gratitude. I was a not-too-adventurous eater, trying to get by on a meager budget, and was thrilled to find something made of ingredients I actually recognized. Tuna, hard-boiled eggs, potatoes, olives, onions, tomatoes.
SPORTS
March 13, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON, mahont@phillynews.com
THINK YOUR boss is bad? Well he, or she, has nothing on Matt Shaner, owner of the AFL's Pittsburgh Power. On Saturday, Shaner got the team together for a pregame meal at an Olive Garden near Orlando. And then he fired everybody. Now let's be clear: Shaner had reason to drop the ax. The players were being asked by their union to strike before that night's season-opener against the Orlando Predators. The players association wanted the owners to give the players - most of whom are paid $400 a game - a $300 per game raise.
FOOD
March 8, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
A n excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Giada DeLaurentiis has a new cookbook, Weeknights With Giada , to be released this month, with recipes designed for throwing together a good dinner after a long day at work. Even TV chefs want family dinners. Giada wants to give her daughter the home-cooked dinners she remembers growing up. But even she doesn't have hours to spend. "Because my daughter is 4, I want to spend my free time hanging out with her," she told me in a phone interview.
FOOD
March 8, 2012 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
My husband and daughter do not get my emotional attachment to stuffed food, which I find to be as exciting as getting a package in the mail. They like the culinary genre well enough, but roll their eyeballs heavenward when, on occasion, I deify pork chops, grape leaves, squash blossoms, vegetables, or any other type of food that performs as a duffel bag. They take for granted the forethought, imagination, knife skills, and care needed to...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012
* Forget daffodils - it's the shad run that really heralds spring 'round here. Sam Mink's Oyster House (1516 Sansom St., 215-567-7683) celebrates the migratory fish's annual swim-by with seasonal dishes from Chef Andy Kitko, including a three-course shad dinner for $40, available nightly Monday through March 17. * Now here's a worthy wine and food pairing: R2L restaurant (Two Liberty Place, 50 S. 16th St., 215-564-5337) and Napa's Cakebread Cellars will hold a Vintner Dinner hosted by Dennis Cakebread and R2L chef/owner Daniel Stern at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By Heather Hollingsworth, Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Too often it is after the fact that teachers discover their students worry less about math and reading and more about where the next meal comes from. So Doug White, principal of Garfield Elementary School in inner-city Kansas City, was relieved when his school, like many across the country, began offering dinner to students enrolled in after-school child-care or tutoring programs. With breakfast and lunch already provided for poor students, many children now get all their meals at school.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
OUR CITY sits only about 60 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, even closer to the Delaware Bay, and our river port is one of the busiest on the East Coast. While you wouldn't exactly call Philadelphia "maritime" (as one might call Baltimore), the sea certainly isn't a foreign concept. Yet, when it comes to dining, seafood is so often a struggle in this city. Why aren't there more, and better, seafood places here in Philadelphia, I often wonder? Many others seem to feel the same way, if I judge by how often I'm asked to recommend "a really good seafood place.
FOOD
February 9, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's one of the benefits of spending Valentine's Day at home: You get to eat what you want. Sure, you have to make it, but that also means costs can stay down, and you don't have to fight the crowds or be subjected to a rule-ridden tasting menu. And honestly, when is the last time you had a special dinner with your loved one at home without the TV on? Light some candles. It's a nice thing. Sticking around the abode means you can casually indulge. I've created a menu that allows just that, taking the best of a steak-house dinner and combining it with pop-a-pilsner elements.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BILL VALENTINE liked nothing better than to sit in front of the TV with his Aunt Kitty and watch sports. In addition to the pleasure of sharing an important game with his aunt, he knew that she would fix him a big meal to go with the experience. "Bill loved to eat - a lot," his family said. William T. Valentine, a social worker for the city Department of Human Services, former teacher in the Philadelphia School District, community activist, athlete and coach, died Jan. 30 after a brief illness.
FOOD
January 12, 2012 | By Judy Hevrdejs, Chicago Tribune
What happens beyond the swinging doors that lead into a restaurant's kitchen isn't always the infernal scullery you see on reality TV. Sure, plates get dropped, stockpots get banged around, kitchen crews shout above the din, and temperatures rise as the evening's service hits its peak. Happens in any kitchen (even yours or mine) as the clock ticks toward dinner. What helps many top restaurants keep their kitchen crews cool and in sync when working in high gear? They sit down together before dinner service for a meal, often simple comfort foods, prepared by staff.
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