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NEWS
April 24, 1991 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Special to The Inquirer
By this morning, all 717 students at Camden's Forest Hill Elementary School will have booster shots against measles. Or they will not be in class. This is Forest Hill's defense against a statewide epidemic that continues to spread, infecting more children in the first three months of this year than in any of the previous three full years. When four of Forest Hill's students came down with spots, the school district decided to take action. "You can't get into school in the first place if you haven't had your shots," said Marilyn Malony, health coordinator for the city's 33 public schools.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Idris M. Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Health officials yesterday urged Philadelphians to be judicious in deciding whether to visit one of the city's health centers to obtain a measles vaccination. Dr. Robert Sharrar, an assistant city health commissioner, said that because of widespread concern over the city's measles epidemic, district health centers have been swamped with requests for the measles vaccine. "We have limited resources, and we want to immunize the segment of the population that can most benefit from the vaccine," he said.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alarmed that Philadelphia may soon be facing a measles epidemic among children, the city Health Department is ready to recommend that youngsters be vaccinated against the disease as early as six months of age, instead of waiting until the usual 15 months. Officials said yesterday that they hoped the stepped-up immunization schedule would ward off a widespread outbreak. They said they expected the recommendations to be finalized and adopted in the next 10 days. "We're clearly at the beginning of an outbreak," said Dr. Robert G. Sharrar, assistant health commissioner for disease prevention.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
New Jersey health officials, battling a mysterious measles outbreak concentrated at high schools in Medford and Toms River, yesterday recommended reimmunizing an estimated 7,000 children and youths in Burlington and Ocean Counties. About 300 people have been diagnosed with measles during the last three months - more than 10 times the normal number for an entire year in all of New Jersey. Roughly two-thirds of those have been students at Shawnee High School in Medford Township and at Toms River High School East in Toms River, officials said.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
The nurses insisted the shots would be practically painless. But the three Hagovsky sisters weren't buying. Chris, 16; Angie, 14, and Beth, 10, each in a T-shirt, shorts and ponytail, eyed the smiling nurses suspiciously. In unison, the reluctant trio edged forward, right hands protectively clutching the left arms that would soon serve as targets for the nurses' needles. The Medford Township sisters bared their tensed shoulders and held their breath while the nurses jabbed the transparent, blue syringes filled with the measles vaccine into their arms.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some Pennsylvania seventh graders and college freshmen will get a second measles shot for free this fall as part of a national effort to quell the rise of the dangerous disease. The state Health Department should learn this month what its share of the $23.5 million immunization program will be. Every state except Alaska applied for the money, which is enough to provide 1.6 million shots, said Jim Mize, a program consultant in the Division of Immunization of the federal Centers for Disease Control.
NEWS
January 18, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal study reports that more than one-third of Philadelphia children do not get vaccinated on time against measles, a fact that could help explain why the city is experiencing a dramatic increase in measles among preschoolers. A survey of eight cities by the Centers for Disease Control found that vaccination rates varied dramatically from place to place - with only 50 percent of children in Jersey City vaccinated against measles by the age of 2, compared with 65 percent in Philadelphia and 90 percent in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Amy Worden and Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Rep. Becky Corbin (R., Chester) knows about the ravages of contagious disease. Growing up in Johnstown in the 1950s before there was a measles vaccine, Corbin was one of the many thousands of children who contracted the disease. Corbin, who said she still bears the physical scars from measles, went on to become a pharmaceutical chemist. Now as a lawmaker she is spearheading legislation to end the exemption for those who have philosophical objections to vaccines. "I worked to combat the spread of disease, and nothing has been more effective in doing so than vaccinating children," she said Friday.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vaccination officially eliminated measles in the United States in 2000, but the global killer still frightens Julia Shaklee Sammons. As the medical director for infection prevention and control at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Sammons is keenly aware that international travel and parental resistance to U.S. immunization practices are renewing the threat of measles. Orange County, Calif., and New York City have had outbreaks this year, and the U.S. has had 129 confirmed cases of measles though last week - the highest for that period since 1996.
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NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Amy Worden and Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Rep. Becky Corbin (R., Chester) knows about the ravages of contagious disease. Growing up in Johnstown in the 1950s before there was a measles vaccine, Corbin was one of the many thousands of children who contracted the disease. Corbin, who said she still bears the physical scars from measles, went on to become a pharmaceutical chemist. Now as a lawmaker she is spearheading legislation to end the exemption for those who have philosophical objections to vaccines. "I worked to combat the spread of disease, and nothing has been more effective in doing so than vaccinating children," she said Friday.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie and other likely Republican presidential candidates have struggled with consistency in their public positions regarding the value of vaccines, but GlaxoSmithKline chief executive officer Andrew Witty has no such conflicts. "Generally, vaccines go through enormous amounts of testing on safety and efficacy," Witty said Wednesday from London in a conference call with reporters after GSK reported financial results for the fourth quarter and all of 2014. "Clearly, vaccines are a remarkable potential source of human health care.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vaccination officially eliminated measles in the United States in 2000, but the global killer still frightens Julia Shaklee Sammons. As the medical director for infection prevention and control at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Sammons is keenly aware that international travel and parental resistance to U.S. immunization practices are renewing the threat of measles. Orange County, Calif., and New York City have had outbreaks this year, and the U.S. has had 129 confirmed cases of measles though last week - the highest for that period since 1996.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major study conducted at children's hospitals across Canada provides fresh evidence that the newer version of the whooping cough vaccine has far fewer serious side effects than the older version. The Canadian findings, to be presented in Philadelphia today at a meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, show that the newer vaccine dramatically reduced the number of children admitted to hospitals for vaccine-related seizures and collapse. "The message to parents is, 'The bad vaccine is gone,' " said Dr. David W. Scheifele, a pediatrics professor at the University of British Columbia, who headed the study.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Children in metropolitan Philadelphia are more likely to be without health insurance, public or private, than any other children in the state, according to a study released yesterday. Nearly one in five children - or 19 percent - in Philadelphia and its four Pennsylvania suburban counties live in households with no private insurance or Medicaid to pay for routine as well as emergency care, said the study by the Pennsylvania State Data Center. But the picture is also troubling for the rest of Pennsylvania, where one in seven children age 15 or younger - or 14.9 percent - lack health-care coverage, the study showed.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Alarmed by the continuing spread of measles among Pennsylvania children, the state Health Department next month will begin requiring the immunization of most youngsters in day-care programs. The regulation is effective Nov. 4. It is the first time the state has required such immunization for preschoolers. Children entering elementary school must be vaccinated against a series of infectious diseases. The requirement would apply to preschool children in a variety of group settings, including commercial day-care centers, Head Start programs, nursery schools and child-care services based in private homes.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Special to The Inquirer
By this morning, all 717 students at Camden's Forest Hill Elementary School will have booster shots against measles. Or they will not be in class. This is Forest Hill's defense against a statewide epidemic that continues to spread, infecting more children in the first three months of this year than in any of the previous three full years. When four of Forest Hill's students came down with spots, the school district decided to take action. "You can't get into school in the first place if you haven't had your shots," said Marilyn Malony, health coordinator for the city's 33 public schools.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Idris M. Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Health officials yesterday urged Philadelphians to be judicious in deciding whether to visit one of the city's health centers to obtain a measles vaccination. Dr. Robert Sharrar, an assistant city health commissioner, said that because of widespread concern over the city's measles epidemic, district health centers have been swamped with requests for the measles vaccine. "We have limited resources, and we want to immunize the segment of the population that can most benefit from the vaccine," he said.
NEWS
January 18, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal study reports that more than one-third of Philadelphia children do not get vaccinated on time against measles, a fact that could help explain why the city is experiencing a dramatic increase in measles among preschoolers. A survey of eight cities by the Centers for Disease Control found that vaccination rates varied dramatically from place to place - with only 50 percent of children in Jersey City vaccinated against measles by the age of 2, compared with 65 percent in Philadelphia and 90 percent in Pittsburgh.
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