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September 16, 1997 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Aaron Thomas has done the pyramids and the Sphinx. He has ridden a boat on the Nile. He has stayed at swanky hotels in Alexandria. Just don't remind him of the cuisine the Downingtown junior had to stomach in two trips to Egypt this summer with the United States' under-17 national soccer team. "The food was horrible," said Thomas with a recollection of queasiness. "We ate the same thing over and over again: rice and chicken. And the chicken was probably camel meat or llama meat, we didn't even know.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | by Amy Joy Lanou and A.R. Hogan
To give the authors of "Eat this steak!" (Op-ed Feb. 5) due credit, they got one thing quite right - the federal Food Guide Pyramid heavily suffers from industry taint and poorly serves the public-health interest. However, quite contrary to Michael and Mary Dan Eades' assertions of grain bias, it's the politically well-connected dairy, meat and egg industries whose clout dominates and skewers the 9-year-old Food Pyramid. For starters, its release was delayed one year until April 1992, and its contents diluted, under intense pressure from animal agribusiness interests.
NEWS
March 16, 1987
The March issue of Changing Times discloses that the U.S. Department of Agriculture proposes permitting meat processors to decrease the fat content in frankfurters and add an equivalent amount of water. Is the department becoming more concerned about the public's health, or about greater profits for the processor? Some time ago the Agriculture Department adopted a similar proposal allowing injection of water into fresh hams, thus forcing the consumer to pay meat prices for water.
FOOD
April 27, 1988 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
An old-fashioned butcher back in Grandmother's day was a cook's best friend. It was sometimes a good idea to keep your eye on his thumb, or so I'm told, but he was the one you went to for all kinds of information about meat. Every kind of question from "What should I have for dinner?" to "How do I fix it?" were commonly asked of the butcher back then. But in the early 1940s, he gradually began to disappear. In many places, he first retreated behind glass panels that enclosed ever more sterile-looking cutting rooms.
FOOD
November 2, 1988 | By Merle Ellis, Special to the Daily News
Aside from the smell of fresh sawdust on the floor and the sight of a cooler full of Prime beef aging to perfection, one of the best things about being a butcher in an old-fashioned meat market was the opportunity it provided for exchanging ideas (and recipes) with customers. I got some of my best ideas that way. Your cards and letters have made writing "The Butcher" column just as satisfying for the same reason. Keep them coming. I enjoy hearing from you. Hamburger - ground beef - continues to be the subject of much correspondence.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Even before it was hung, "Meat: Art at the Broiling Point" at McNeil Gallery stirred spirited discussion. Some charged that the group of independent artists that calls itself Meat was selling out. The basis of this allegation was that Meat had made a reputation in the last few years while circumventing the regular gallery system but suddenly had reversed itself and was exhibiting within the system. I don't see it that way. Today, public relations is just as important as creativity to the success of an artist, and Meat is particularly adept at self-promotion.
FOOD
September 24, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. From what kind of beef is chopped meat made? A. Many of us, while poring over the various packages of chopped meat at the supermarket, packages which may be labeled "sirloin," "chuck," "regular," "premium" or whatever, tend to visualize the butcher in the back room placing a sirloin steak or chuck roast into the grinder. But generally, ground beef is made from the less tender and less popular cuts of beef. In a booklet prepared by the Department of Agriculture, it states that because ground beef is so popular, many supermarkets and butchers cannot get enough meat from a carcass of beef after they have removed the steaks, roasts and other cuts to fill the demand.
NEWS
September 21, 1986 | By Robert J. Salgado, Special to The Inquirer
For those worried about the use of growth hormones and antibiotics in animal feeds, there is a way to ensure that meat is chemical-free. There are farmers in the area who raise steers and pigs without the additives. The meat from these animals is available at some stores or can be bought packed for freezing in bulk from butchers who specialize in such meats. One such butcher is Ronald Hunsberger of Bedminster, Bucks County, who packages his meats under the Sunny Brook Farm label.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The name is Cherry Street Chinese Vegetarian Restaurant, which sounds as if there are vegetarian restaurants all over Chinatown. Sure, you can get vegetarian dishes at most of the Chinese restaurants in the area. And this isn't the only one that caters strictly to vegetarians. But Cherry Street Chinese Vegetarian Restaurant is in a class by itself. There is no smoking. The menu is totally vegetarian, and the restaurant features macrobiotic and Pritikin menus. Not only that, it says it is certified kosher.
FOOD
February 17, 1988 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
In days of old, not when knights were bold but when butchers knew their business better, there was a whole category of meat products available that weren't what they seemed to be. I'm not talking about mislabeling. That's a much more modern innovation. Nobody back then called a top round a "London broil. " They didn't even call flank steak "London broil" in those days. In a fancy restaurant, perhaps, but not in a meat market. What I'm talking about are cuts of meat that were made for one reason or another to look like something that they were not. They were "mock meats" - "mock chicken legs," "mock duck," "mock turtle.
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NEWS
June 26, 2015
P'unk Burger Where: 1823 E. Passyunk Ave. The lowdown: Obscenely delicious organic, all-natural burgers, milkshakes and soda in the heart of South Philly's uber-popular restaurant row. Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 a.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday. Backstory: Marlo Dilks and her husband, Jason, decided to branch out into burgers after building a small pizza empire with SliCE in South Philly, Rittenhouse Square and Washington Township, N.J. "We felt like there were a lot of burgers in the city, but not any burger places in South Philly," said Marlo.
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Danya Henninger, For The Inquirer
Just two years after hawking his first slabs of home-cured bacon at the Lansdowne Farmers Market, Ari Miller is preparing to take his artisanal charcuterie nationwide. 1732 Meats, his new, 4,000- square-foot plant in Yeadon, recently received USDA certification and began production. Miller is hoping for the same reception around the country that he's gotten from local chefs for his high-quality, sustainably raised salumi. "The quality of Ari's product is unmatched as far as domestic salumi is concerned," said Joe Cicala, chef and partner at East Passyunk's Le Virtu and Brigantessa.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | Philly Clout
DEMOCRATIC mayoral nominee Jim Kenney , who steamrollered state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams in Tuesday's Democratic primary, skipped the traditional postelection lunch at the Palm to attend a Broad Street Ministry luncheon with Republican mayoral candidate Melissa Murray Bailey and Gov. Wolf . The Clout team - big believers in tradition - decided to post up at the bar at the Palm with N.Y. strip steaks and Old Fashioneds, knowing full...
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY VANCE LEHMKUHL
  ON EARTH DAY, there are those who get into celebrating the planet and tweaking our lifestyle for the common good, and there are those who don't. Those who don't sometimes make good points about home recycling bins as mere spit in the ocean of vast industrial pollution, and other times indulge in stubborn ear-plugging accompanied by magical and/or wishful thinking. To all of us who recognize a scientifically credible threat, the head-in-sand position can be frustrating, and we might roll our eyes at its ridiculousness.
NEWS
March 3, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's true that you didn't have to come from South Philadelphia or be an ethnic Italian to win Sunday's first-ever Red Gravy Cook-off, sponsored by the East Passyunk Crossing Civic Association. But there's no doubt those qualities helped give contestants an edge. South Philadelphia Italians were making and enjoying red gravy well before anyone came up with the name "East Passyunk Crossing" for the neighborhood around 10th and Morris. So, even if they do occasionally spike their gravies with a secret ingredient or two, they hold firm to the belief that "red gravy has to taste a certain way," explained Mark Squilla, the local councilman and South Philadelphia native who served as one of the competition judges.
NEWS
January 16, 2015
CHICKEN LAAB WITH MINT AND THAI BASIL IN LETTUCE CUPS This recipe takes just 23 minutes to prepare and cook. Juice of 2 large limes 1 pound ground organic free-range chicken or turkey (half white and dark meat) 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 2 shallots, thinly sliced 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/4 cup paleo-friendly fish sauce 2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped 2 tablespoons Thai basil, chopped 2 tablespoons mint, chopped 2 scallions, chopped 2 limes, quartered, for serving 1 head iceberg lettuce, washed and dried, leaves separated and kept whole In a medium bowl, combine the lime juice and ground meat and mix well.
FOOD
December 19, 2014 | By Joelle Farrell, For The Inquirer
The holiday season is a time when I want to impress friends and family with a special meal, but I don't want to miss all the fun and socializing and arrive at the table sweaty and exhausted. Since I want the meal to register a notch above a typical supper, I've learned it's best to plan a menu that can be prepared largely ahead of time, with a few quick trips to the kitchen during cocktail hour. Rich, indulgent ingredients like red meat, red wine, cream, and chocolate can make the simplest dishes taste extraordinary, and they're the perfect way to savor a celebratory meal during a cold, dark winter evening.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, Heather Thomason was living in Brooklyn, N.Y., working in graphic design and spending her off-hours at farmers' markets and food co-ops to fuel her cooking habit. "People asked me did I wish that I worked in food, because I was always talking about food and always cooking," she says. Now - three years and one radical career change later - she's a butcher and manager at Kensington Quarters, the new restaurant, bar, and butcher shop in Fishtown that specializes in carving up whole animals sustainably raised on local farms.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Andrew K. Touchstone, 51, of Gladwyne, a Philadelphia lawyer and small-game hunter who loved to work his bird dogs in the marshes of Delaware, died of a heart attack Tuesday, Oct. 21, at his home. A Bryn Mawr native, Mr. Touchstone graduated from Harriton High School, Lehigh University, and Penn State's Dickinson School of Law. He was a longtime resident of the Main Line. His first job was with the law firm Swartz, Campbell & Detweiler in Center City. He worked for several more years at Smith, Giacometti & Chikowski before starting his own firm, Touchstone & Associates, in 2005.
FOOD
September 19, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Back-to-school energy pervades September - even decades past graduation. For Jews around the world, this sense is heightened by the overlapping of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashanah, literally "head of the year," celebrates ending and beginning again. As part of the annual High Holiday rituals of taking stock, making amends, and looking forward there are opportunities for feasting and fasting, and always there are wishes for a "sweet new year. " That translates at the table to a widespread tradition of eating apples and honey, and other treats at the holiday table.
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