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September 16, 1997 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Aaron Thomas has done the pyramids and the Sphinx. He has ridden a boat on the Nile. He has stayed at swanky hotels in Alexandria. Just don't remind him of the cuisine the Downingtown junior had to stomach in two trips to Egypt this summer with the United States' under-17 national soccer team. "The food was horrible," said Thomas with a recollection of queasiness. "We ate the same thing over and over again: rice and chicken. And the chicken was probably camel meat or llama meat, we didn't even know.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | by Amy Joy Lanou and A.R. Hogan
To give the authors of "Eat this steak!" (Op-ed Feb. 5) due credit, they got one thing quite right - the federal Food Guide Pyramid heavily suffers from industry taint and poorly serves the public-health interest. However, quite contrary to Michael and Mary Dan Eades' assertions of grain bias, it's the politically well-connected dairy, meat and egg industries whose clout dominates and skewers the 9-year-old Food Pyramid. For starters, its release was delayed one year until April 1992, and its contents diluted, under intense pressure from animal agribusiness interests.
NEWS
March 16, 1987
The March issue of Changing Times discloses that the U.S. Department of Agriculture proposes permitting meat processors to decrease the fat content in frankfurters and add an equivalent amount of water. Is the department becoming more concerned about the public's health, or about greater profits for the processor? Some time ago the Agriculture Department adopted a similar proposal allowing injection of water into fresh hams, thus forcing the consumer to pay meat prices for water.
FOOD
April 27, 1988 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
An old-fashioned butcher back in Grandmother's day was a cook's best friend. It was sometimes a good idea to keep your eye on his thumb, or so I'm told, but he was the one you went to for all kinds of information about meat. Every kind of question from "What should I have for dinner?" to "How do I fix it?" were commonly asked of the butcher back then. But in the early 1940s, he gradually began to disappear. In many places, he first retreated behind glass panels that enclosed ever more sterile-looking cutting rooms.
FOOD
November 2, 1988 | By Merle Ellis, Special to the Daily News
Aside from the smell of fresh sawdust on the floor and the sight of a cooler full of Prime beef aging to perfection, one of the best things about being a butcher in an old-fashioned meat market was the opportunity it provided for exchanging ideas (and recipes) with customers. I got some of my best ideas that way. Your cards and letters have made writing "The Butcher" column just as satisfying for the same reason. Keep them coming. I enjoy hearing from you. Hamburger - ground beef - continues to be the subject of much correspondence.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Even before it was hung, "Meat: Art at the Broiling Point" at McNeil Gallery stirred spirited discussion. Some charged that the group of independent artists that calls itself Meat was selling out. The basis of this allegation was that Meat had made a reputation in the last few years while circumventing the regular gallery system but suddenly had reversed itself and was exhibiting within the system. I don't see it that way. Today, public relations is just as important as creativity to the success of an artist, and Meat is particularly adept at self-promotion.
FOOD
September 24, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. From what kind of beef is chopped meat made? A. Many of us, while poring over the various packages of chopped meat at the supermarket, packages which may be labeled "sirloin," "chuck," "regular," "premium" or whatever, tend to visualize the butcher in the back room placing a sirloin steak or chuck roast into the grinder. But generally, ground beef is made from the less tender and less popular cuts of beef. In a booklet prepared by the Department of Agriculture, it states that because ground beef is so popular, many supermarkets and butchers cannot get enough meat from a carcass of beef after they have removed the steaks, roasts and other cuts to fill the demand.
NEWS
September 21, 1986 | By Robert J. Salgado, Special to The Inquirer
For those worried about the use of growth hormones and antibiotics in animal feeds, there is a way to ensure that meat is chemical-free. There are farmers in the area who raise steers and pigs without the additives. The meat from these animals is available at some stores or can be bought packed for freezing in bulk from butchers who specialize in such meats. One such butcher is Ronald Hunsberger of Bedminster, Bucks County, who packages his meats under the Sunny Brook Farm label.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The name is Cherry Street Chinese Vegetarian Restaurant, which sounds as if there are vegetarian restaurants all over Chinatown. Sure, you can get vegetarian dishes at most of the Chinese restaurants in the area. And this isn't the only one that caters strictly to vegetarians. But Cherry Street Chinese Vegetarian Restaurant is in a class by itself. There is no smoking. The menu is totally vegetarian, and the restaurant features macrobiotic and Pritikin menus. Not only that, it says it is certified kosher.
FOOD
February 17, 1988 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
In days of old, not when knights were bold but when butchers knew their business better, there was a whole category of meat products available that weren't what they seemed to be. I'm not talking about mislabeling. That's a much more modern innovation. Nobody back then called a top round a "London broil. " They didn't even call flank steak "London broil" in those days. In a fancy restaurant, perhaps, but not in a meat market. What I'm talking about are cuts of meat that were made for one reason or another to look like something that they were not. They were "mock meats" - "mock chicken legs," "mock duck," "mock turtle.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016
The Meat Wagon BBQ truck and its faux-wood-panel design recently caught our eye at the Navy Yard. We had to try some of their "swine dining" for ourselves. This award-winning crew isn't reinventing BBQ, so don't look for any multinational fusion dishes. They're looking to master the basics: meat and smoke. "It's BBQ and it's delicious," they state on their website. 'Nuff said. Story: Meat Wagon started on Nicholas Andersch's Big Green Egg smoker. Andersch, an elevator constructor, kept practicing his BBQ technique, then started entering local competitions - and winning.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
Scientists led by Mingyang Song at Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed data from two major studies involving more than 150,000 participants to determine whether people who consumed protein from red and processed meats had a significantly higher mortality rate than those who got their protein from plants. The analysis of the 32-year Nurses' Health Study, followed by the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study at Harvard University, looked at diets of the participants every four years.
FOOD
July 21, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 2 servings 3 tablespoons cooking oil 4 ounces ground pork 2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine (see note) 1 teaspoon sweet fermented sauce 1 teaspoon light soy sauce Salt 7 ounces dried Chinese wheat flour noodles or 11 ounces fresh noodles For the sauce: 3/4 cup chicken stock 2 teaspoons light soy sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon Chinkiang vinegar (see note) 2 to 4 tablespoons chili oil with its sediment, to taste 4 tablespoons finely sliced spring onion greens 5 tablespoons Sichaunese ya cai (or sub Tianjin preserved vegetable, instead, see note)
FOOD
June 17, 2016
1. Set up the grill with both high- and low-heat areas. That allows you to move food away from flare-ups; sear thicker meats over high heat, then finish them over low heat without burning; and cook different types of foods at once, such as steaks over high heat and asparagus over low heat. 2. For instant flavor, use a spice rub instead of a marinade or brine. You eat all of the seasonings in a rub, but throw most of them away in a marinade or brine. 3. For smoke flavor, add wood chunks or chips to the coolest part of the fire, but skip soaking them in water - wood doesn't absorb much, and the water has to evaporate before the wood starts to smoke.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
A jury on Friday convicted a Sudanese refugee of first-degree murder in the stabbing death of a coworker at a Montgomery County meatpacking plant. The jury also found Peter Jok Atem, 34, of Lansdale, guilty of possession of an instrument of crime in the slaying of Danny Vasquez, 25, of Philadelphia, with a 41/2-inch butterfly knife on a frigid day in February 2015. "We're all very grateful," said Jason Vasquez, the victim's brother. Of his brother, who had 3-, 7-, and 10-year-old children, he said that "all he wanted to do was work and provide for his family.
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
He was a Sudanese refugee, suffering from post-traumatic stress order, his attorney told the jurors, and he never intended to fatally attack his co-worker. But in its closing argument, the prosecution countered that Peter Jok Atem, 34, "had specific intent" to kill Danny Vasquez, 25, at a Franconia, Montgomery County, meat-packing plant with a 41/2-inch butterfly knife on a frigid day in February 2015. The Montgomery County Court jury in the first-degree murder trial before Judge Gail A. Weilheimer deliberated for less than an hour late Thursday before recessing until Friday morning.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Grace Toohey, STAFF WRITERS
When police arrived to investigate reports of a stabbing at a Franconia meatpacking plant in February 2015, they simply followed the blood. A crimson trail ran through the plant, out a door, and across the snow into a shed. "The trail was pretty extensive," Montgomery County Detective Ed Schikel said. Schikel was among the first witnesses called as trial opened Tuesday in Norristown for the man they found in that shed, Peter Jok Atem. Prosecutors say Atem, 34, stabbed a co-worker, Danny Vasquez, 25, to death with a 41/2-inch butterfly knife.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
After a journey of 7,000 miles, Joey, Liberty, and Tisha are looking for new homes in South Jersey. The three dogs, all females, were taken in late April from a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, as part of a broader effort by the Humane Society International to shut down such farms in that country. They arrived in Camden County about two weeks ago and are available for adoption at the Camden County Animal Shelter in Gloucester Township. The Humane Society delivered 171 Korean dogs to U.S. shelters, including St. Hubert's Animal Welfare Center in Madison, N.J., where Joey, a golden retriever; Liberty, a Siberian husky; and Tisha, a Tosa Inu, first traveled.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I'm getting married soon and am a vegetarian. Our menu has one meat option and one vegetarian option, as well as appetizers (a mixture of meat and veggie), sides, and dessert. My fiancé and I feel this is sufficient. But my parents are paying, and my mother is brought to tears every time we talk about the wedding because she thinks some of her friends will be offended without two meat options for an entree. As a vegetarian, I'm already not thrilled to be serving meat at all, and I've tried to explain that another entree will cost a lot. She insists that she's paying, so it's fine, but we've been through this before with wedding plans.
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