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FOOD
October 7, 1987 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
The meat industry, it seems, has convinced itself, after much research and many expensive consumer surveys, that if it is to survive in the meat-eating world of tomorrow - if indeed there is one - "IT MUST HAVE FAITH!" Faith Popcorn. She's a "trend analyst" from New York and founder of Brain Reserve, a New York-based marketing firm. "What," you ask, "is a trend analyst?" Well, you see, that's kind of a new kind of somebody somewhat akin to a "consultant" who comes from out-of- town (usually New York)
NEWS
May 18, 2003 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From key policymakers to midlevel administrators, the Department of Agriculture is staffed with former executives of the meat and poultry industry, now in charge of regulating their former employers. The USDA has long had connections to America's big meat packers, and critics say the agency is too cozy with the industry. Regulators with industry backgrounds are unlikely to fight for much-needed enhancements to the USDA's enforcement powers - which meat companies have successfully kept off the congressional agenda for years, said Dan Glickman, who was secretary of agriculture from 1995 to 2001.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A key House panel voted yesterday to block the most sweeping reforms to meat and poultry inspections since 1906, despite warnings from consumer groups that the action could be deadly. The House Appropriations Committee voted 26-15 to withhold funds for the Department of Agriculture's planned changes to the inspection system - unless the meat industry is allowed to help rewrite the inspection rules. The USDA's proposed changes were designed to use modern techniques to cut down on the estimated 4,000 deaths and five million illnesses from contaminated meat every year.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The meat industry and its allies in Congress are trying to kill a pending overhaul of the government's inspection system, intended to better identify contaminated meat. The 1996 budget plan already approved by the House would stop funding for further Agriculture Department efforts to revamp its 90-year-old meat- inspection system, which just about everyone agrees is archaic and useless in finding bacteria that cause illness. The Senate's 1996 budget plan does not address the issue, and House-Senate conferees are now meeting to reconcile differences between the two budgets.
NEWS
May 21, 2003
At the outset of any discusson of the serious shortcomings of the U.S. meat inspection system, it is important to appreciate the terrible costs: Kevin Kowalcyk, a Wisconsin boy dead at age 2 after apparently eating a hamburger contaminated with deadly E. coli bacteria. Julia Capriotti, a New Jersey girl crippled in her mother's womb by the the bacteria listeria, which contaminates pre-cooked meats. Now age 5, Julia cannot walk or stand. Raymond Drayton, 75, a retired Philadelphia bus driver who doubled over in pain on Aug. 28 last year and died by Sept.
NEWS
October 10, 1994
ESPY IS TERMED A SCAPEGOAT OF THE MEAT INDUSTRY The resignation of Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy represents more than a personal tragedy for a dedicated public servant and a political liability for the President. It represents the latest victory by the meat industry in its relentless battle against the public interest and a form of retribution for Mr. Espy's insistence on improved meat inspection and consumer warning labels on raw meat and poultry products. This is reminiscent of the flap over the celebrated McGovern Report, which ushered in the government's current involvement in dietary guidelines.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By David Goldstein, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Imagine the Department of Education pushing an idea called "Teacherless Tuesday," or the Department of Homeland Security suggesting "Fenceless Friday. " The Department of Agriculture, promoter of all things edible, had a plan this week in an in-house newsletter to promote "Meatless Mondays" in the vast bureaucracy's employee cafeterias. Meatless Monday is a global campaign backed by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and others to reduce the possible health risks of eating too much meat.
NEWS
October 9, 2008
WILL 2008 mark the beginning of the end for the U.S. meat industry? The escalating costs of corn and soybeans caused by harvest shortfalls, rising global demand and government-mandated ethanol production are forcing widespread cutbacks in the number of animals raised for food. So does the current credit crunch. A recent report by the Pew Charitable Trusts recommends a phase-out of intensive confinement, which would force additional cutbacks. For the animals and caring consumers, such cuts are long overdue.
NEWS
April 7, 2001
Here's an easy way to keep foot-and-mouth and mad cow disease from coming to a farm near you: Stop buying and eating meat. Short of this sure-fire solution, we can curb the tidal wave of disaster by cleaning up the cruelties of the meat industry. Farmers who raise animals in factory warehouses . . . may weep in front of television cameras over the animals killed, but. . . their tears are motivated by economics, not compassion.. . . To clean up this mess, factory farmers must stop treating animals as units of production and recognize that they are living, breathing beings whose vulnerable immune systems will not tolerate being stuffed into cages, hauled from one dreadful place to another, and a fed a diet of recycled dead animals, growth hormones and antibiotics.
NEWS
March 18, 1990
Once a year, millions of Americans take part in "The Great American Smokeout" by going a whole day without smoking a cigarette. Somehow "The Great American Meatout," which will take place Tuesday for the sixth year, can't quite compete. Even though experts have cited health benefits from lowering one's meat consumption, the Meatout hasn't captured the imagination of America's carnivorous masses. Why? The gimmick of a special day for quitting a habit (with hope of quitting for good)
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NEWS
March 6, 2015
NEW DIET guidelines: a death knell for meat eating? Headlines for February's long-awaited Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee recommendations practically shouted as much. And the meat industry seemed to agree: Barry Carpenter, president and CEO of the North American Meat Institute, quickly slammed the committee for a "flawed" report "generalizing about an entire category of foods," although that's exactly what the guidelines have done since back in the "Four Food Groups" days. At issue is a shift in the overall favorability of flesh-based foods in the diet: When the guidelines were last revised, in 2010, they said that healthy eating "emphasizes . . . lean meats and poultry," while the new recommendations say a healthy diet is "lower in red and processed meat.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
THE INDUSTRY'S Pat Szoke is a chef, but if he ever decides to hang up his apron, he's got a future in diplomacy. That much became clear last month when he adroitly responded to a question I likely pose more than I should: Do you like Spam? "I wouldn't say it's my number one choice," replied Szoke, who was seeking ideas for a limited-time menu inspired by the tastes of local food and drink writers. He'd never sampled Hormel's tinned wonder meat, a high point of American ingenuity that's somehow become "one of the most reviled foodstuffs known to man," according to Philly-based author Carolyn Wyman's 1999 book, Spam: A Biography . But he knew enough to approach the product with a healthy helping of skepticism.
FOOD
January 31, 2013 | By Jim Romanoff, Associated Press
Super Bowl Sunday surely is one of the meatiest eating days of the year. And some recent trends on the butchering side of things are offering whole new ways to raise your meat game, so to speak. Until recently, shopping for meat at the grocer generally meant you were limited to just a few mainstream cuts, says meat guru Bruce Aidells, author of last year's The Great Meat Cookbook . Part of the problem was the standardization of the meat industry. Butchering skills waned because so much was handled at the industrial level.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By David Goldstein, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Imagine the Department of Education pushing an idea called "Teacherless Tuesday," or the Department of Homeland Security suggesting "Fenceless Friday. " The Department of Agriculture, promoter of all things edible, had a plan this week in an in-house newsletter to promote "Meatless Mondays" in the vast bureaucracy's employee cafeterias. Meatless Monday is a global campaign backed by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and others to reduce the possible health risks of eating too much meat.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Barbara Shelly
To the legion of Americans running away from a hamburger additive as fast as a startled Angus, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is here to tell you: "It's beef, dude. " Technically, he's right. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's official definition of beef for marketing purposes is "flesh of cattle. " And the product officially known as "lean, finely textured beef," and now infamously known as "pink slime," does originate with a cow. But, dude, we're talking about salvaged scraps, simmered at low heat and spun at high speed to remove the fat, then spritzed with ammonia to kill bacteria.
NEWS
October 9, 2008
WILL 2008 mark the beginning of the end for the U.S. meat industry? The escalating costs of corn and soybeans caused by harvest shortfalls, rising global demand and government-mandated ethanol production are forcing widespread cutbacks in the number of animals raised for food. So does the current credit crunch. A recent report by the Pew Charitable Trusts recommends a phase-out of intensive confinement, which would force additional cutbacks. For the animals and caring consumers, such cuts are long overdue.
NEWS
July 1, 2005
WHATEVER happened to the good old days, when the Fourth of July was just Independence Day and the worst things we had to fear were traffic jams and wayward fireworks? Recent government warnings suggest that this year's top threat is food poisoning from inadequately grilled hamburgers and hot dogs. According to the Centers for Disease Control, deadly pathogens in meat products sicken millions of consumers annually and kill 9,000. Key offenders are E. coli, salmonella, and listeria.
NEWS
December 12, 2003
THE Thanksgiving tale by Ronnie Polaneczky (Nov. 26) contained unfair and insulting inferences against a generations-old family business, Cannuli House of Pork. Ms. Polaneczky, in an unsuccessful attempt at telling a humorous holiday tale, erroneously portrays the owner, Charles Cannuli, as a merciless butcher who decapitates the pig before the eyes of impressionable children. But the fault is on Ms. Polaneczky's decision to expose young children to things they were obviously not mature enough to handle.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Domenic E. Venuto, 73, of Somers Point, N.J., former owner of Venuto's Veal & Lamb, a South Philadelphia meat-packing company that served restaurants, hotels and supermarkets in the area for more than 55 years, died of heart failure Sunday at home. Mr. Venuto was a longtime resident of Havertown before moving to Atlantic County eight years ago. He and his company remained in business until the late 1990s, even after the meat-packing industry had consolidated and the invention of vacuum packaging wiped out his competitors.
NEWS
May 21, 2003
At the outset of any discusson of the serious shortcomings of the U.S. meat inspection system, it is important to appreciate the terrible costs: Kevin Kowalcyk, a Wisconsin boy dead at age 2 after apparently eating a hamburger contaminated with deadly E. coli bacteria. Julia Capriotti, a New Jersey girl crippled in her mother's womb by the the bacteria listeria, which contaminates pre-cooked meats. Now age 5, Julia cannot walk or stand. Raymond Drayton, 75, a retired Philadelphia bus driver who doubled over in pain on Aug. 28 last year and died by Sept.
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