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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The path to enlightenment is taken with touching innocence every night at the little Wilma Theater on Sansom Street. In the opening play of the season, The Road to Mecca, a woman passing into old age lights the way with candles, realizes that she has reached her spiritual destination and decides the time has come to blow them out. Thus does the life cycle take on meaning in Athol Fugard's treasure of a play, which stands apart from the...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's no wonder they call it Antiques at Harvest Time in Mullica Hill. Collectors will find a bountiful array of primarily country antiques at this show, the ninth annual one, Saturday in this small village in Gloucester County. The show will be held at Harrison Township School on North Main Street but, as avid area collectors know, Mullica Hill is an antiquing mecca with 40 shops stretched out along Main Street. So antiquers who can't find what they're looking for at the show should head south on Main, where most shops will be open for business as usual.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
An Iranian radio report said hundreds of Muslim pilgrims in Mecca demonstrated yesterday to protest the deaths of 402 people during last year's pilgrimage, but Saudi Arabia denounced the story as a lie. The broadcast on government-run Tehran Radio said Saudi police attacked some of the protesters, who it said were also demonstrating against Israel, the United States and the Soviet Union. The official Saudi press agency SPA quoted what it called a responsible source as saying that the Iranian report was "totally fabricated and it has no basis of truth whatsoever.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | By Saleema N. Syed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Standing outside the entrance to the Mecca (also known as the Grand Mosque), I quickly slipped off my shoes and put them in a plastic bag along with the footwear of the rest of my family. Shoes, because they track dirt and filth, are forbidden in this most sacred Muslim place. My father extended his hands to my sister and me and asked us to close our eyes. He would guide us through the porticos leading to the courtyard that houses the Kaaba, the cubic brick structure that is considered the center of Islam.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | BY THE ECONOMIST
The deaths of more than 400 Muslims in front of the Grand Mosque in Mecca on July 31 arose from a simple and yet momentous disagreement. Should pilgrims during the haj behave according to the injunctions of the Koran, which they hold to be the word of God, or should they obey a cranky old cleric in Tehran? Surah ii, verse 197, of the Koran enjoins pilgrims to abstain (depending on the translation) from "abuse," "angry conversations," "contentious discussion," "violence," "lewdness.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The arrival of Athol Fugard's The Road to Mecca with - at last - Yvonne Bryceland as its radiant centerpiece is one of the signal events of the decade: a powerfully affecting performance in a major work by a playwright who is arguably the best of those writing today for the English-speaking stage. The play opened last night at the Promenade Theater. Prevented by Actors Equity from appearing in the play's world premiere at the Yale Repertory Theater in New Haven, Conn., in 1984, Bryceland starred in the National Theater of Great Britain production two years later, winning the Olivier Award as best actress of the London season.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1996 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This summer, for the first time in 56 years, the folks in the Chester County hamlet of Jennersville will not hear the twang of distant country music from their porches. The music is on hold because Sunset Park, a country mecca for generations, will be closed for the season. When more than two feet of snow hit the area last month, the aluminum roof over Sunset Park's autograph-signing area and part of its main outdoor seating collapsed. The roof now covers most of the front-row seats.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Name some great centers of culture. Paris. Rome. Venice. Woodbury. Woodbury? Seems out of place among world-renowned cities that feature centuries-old art and historic cathedrals. But 10 Woodbury residents still hope to turn their city into a mecca for culture - on a far smaller scale - in Gloucester County. They recently formed the Woodbury Council for Art and Performances, an organization designed to sponsor concerts, plays and other cultural events for Woodbury and the rest of Gloucester County.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plays of South African writer Athol Fugard typically deal with the racial problems of his native land. They also focus primarily on male characters, with women in supporting roles. In The Road to Mecca, race is dealt with only tangentially, and the central characters are two women. The play proves that Fugard does not need the emotionally charged issue of apartheid to energize his imagination and that he can create women who are as vivid as his men. The strong characters and nonracial focus of this forceful play could make it Fugard's most-produced work in this country.
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini said yesterday that Iran held the United States responsible for the deaths of hundreds of Iranian pilgrims last week in the Muslim holy city of Mecca and warned that it would retaliate "at an opportune time," Tehran Radio reported. "We have placed these crimes to the account of the U.S. and we shall demand repayment and take revenge for the blood of the children of Abraham," said Iran's 86-year-old spiritual leader. Iran also announced that its Revolutionary Guards would hold three days of naval maneuvers, code-named "Martyrdom," in the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman and warned all foreign ships and planes to stay out of Iranian territorial waters and airspace in those regions as of midnight (4:30 p.m. Philadelphia time)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
RICK FORD, who has spent 20 years helping people recover from drug and alcohol abuse, wants folks to call his WURD-900AM talk show tonight and tell their stories of rebirth and renewal. "Based on all the negative things going on - shootings and killings, crime and violence - I think it's essential that folks call in to talk about their recovery," Ford said. "I want to end the year on a good note and show that recovery is alive and well here in the city of Philadelphia," he said.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY - It'll probably never surpass Cape May and its environs as the Jersey Shore's birding capital. But a small patch of woods on a coastal islet, where a concrete bridge foundation for part of the Route 52 Causeway was rebuilt two years ago at the resort's main gateway, may just be giving veteran birders a new place to flock. The nesting and the squawking - despite the constant roar of traffic off the nearby causeway - can call to mind explorer Henry Hudson's crew. As soon as the Dutch explorers came ashore in 1609, they started giving everything an embryonic-inspired moniker - such as Great Egg Harbor, Great Egg Bay, Little Egg Inlet - because of the inordinate number of seabird nests and eggs laid out across the marshlands and woodlands as far as the eye could see. Pull in, park your car, and stand for a few minutes on the elevated walkway along stretches on the northern side of the little woods, and you'll likely be able to see at least a half-dozen bird species.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When it comes to the small screen - the really small screens, of computers, tablets, and mobile devices - Philadelphia has a flourishing scene. At a time when Netflix is going strong with Web-only programs such as Orange Is the New Black and House of Cards , Philadelphia is home to a range of Web-only series, starring or written or produced by Philly folks. Among the local film crews in town, you'll find Lee Porter's My Ruined Life ( MRL ) shooting near a Rittenhouse park bench.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
AUSTIN, Texas - Is SXSW Interactive the nerdiest place on earth? The conference, which brought more than 30,000 busily networking techies from all over the globe to Austin last week, and which precedes the better-known SXSW Music, is where the superstar attractions were NSA leaker Edward Snowden (via teleconference), Mythbusters host Adam Savage, and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, who referred to the confab as "geek central. " Panels drilled down into topics like "The Future of Genetics in Everyday Life," "Your Next UX Skill: Prototyping With HTML," and "Combinatorial Creativity: The Future of Innovation.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty years ago, Ed Rendell stood in a freezing drizzle at the southeast corner of Broad and South Streets and told a small crowd to "close your eyes and dream. " The then-mayor painted a portrait of an Avenue of the Arts, a boom-time boulevard of cultural delights. Thousands would crowd its sidewalks after performances. Block after block would buzz with activity. "They pour out on South Broad Street," he said. "Think of what that will mean to us as a city!" So ground was broken for the Arts Bank, a former bank acquired by the William Penn Foundation for conversion to a 238-seat theater and the first footprint on the new Avenue of the Arts, intended to stretch from Temple University 10 miles south to Washington Avenue.
SPORTS
January 4, 2013 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
TRADITION FOR the modern college basketball player is the uniform his team wore last season. History is the last game, if not the last possession. So how exactly do you account for the University of Kansas? Smack in the middle of the country, hard by I-70, with its throwback gym right in the middle of campus on Naismith Drive, KU is as much a feeling as it is a place. But it is a place that has a longstanding love affair with its basketball team that shows no signs of abating.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. CITY COUNCILWOMAN Cindy Bass attends Triumph Baptist Church in Nicetown on Sunday morning, then takes a lunch break at her Mount Airy home with her daughter, Carson, 3; her "great husband," Scott; pit bull Mecca; black Labrador Kinsey, and new kitten . . . "Um, Kitty, for now. " "Mecca was abused," says Bass, explaining the coexistence of...
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smoky, spicy, and sweet - the smells of barbecue filled the air on Sunday, stretching for six blocks and along the beach of North Wildwood, as the three-day New Jersey State Barbecue Championship came to a close. That's right - New Jersey. Many in the competitive barbecuing circuit have asked event coordinator Eric Shenkus, "What does New Jersey know about barbecue?" Apparently quite a lot. An estimated 75,000 people were expected to attend the 14th annual event. That's a huge difference from the first year, which brought 500 people to a fund-raiser in the parking lot across the street from the local fire company, Shenkus said.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Steve Kelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ball strike rang pure. A player of my, um, caliber knows that sweet "thwack" because I hear it but a handful of times every round. Sure enough, I found the last of my Top-Flite XLs soaring against a brilliant blue Scottish sky high above the Coffins, a cluster of mean-spirited pot bunkers on the par 4, 388-yard 13th hole at the Old Course St. Andrews Links. In the distance, colorful hang gliders zigzagged over the North Sea in schizophrenic gales that have driven golfers mad for more than 600 years.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - To honor the 80th birthday of celebrated South African playwright Athol Fugard, The Road to Mecca , a play he wrote in the mid-'80s, opened Tuesday night for the first time on Broadway. We have many reasons to celebrate Fugard - foremost, his creation of exceptional theater in his unswerving march against the official racism of South African apartheid - but The Road to Mecca is not among them. It's a ho-hum play with a dull first act, as tedious as cleaning up the piles on your desk, and with a second act that fails to deliver even the satisfaction of at least a clean desktop.
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