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Mechanical Engineering

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NEWS
May 30, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Villanova University students could not have done worse last year in the General Motors Sun Race of team-designed, solar-powered cars. They finished 32d in a field of 32. But this year, with a lighter, leaner design, six of those same students and about 20 others pulled within spitting distance of taking the winner's title at another sun-driven-car road race. The Wild Solarcat II placed second last week in the third annual American Tour de Sol (a play on the Tour de France bike race)
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pei Chi Chou, 89, a nationally known engineering professor and a leader in the local Chinese American community, died of heart failure Thursday, Feb. 13, at Shannondell at Valley Forge in Audubon, Montgomery County, where he had resided for the last few years. Born in China's Hubei province in 1924, Mr. Chou came to the United States for graduate study in 1947, earning advanced degrees at Harvard and New York Universities, and soon decided to forge a career here. He joined Drexel University as an assistant professor of engineering in 1953.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the shuttle Atlantis roared toward space Friday morning, more than 200 hearts went soaring with it at Drexel University's College of Engineering in honor of shuttle commander Capt. Christopher Ferguson, a graduate of the college. As the launch countdown ended at 11:29 a.m. a loud cheer erupted in the lobby of Bossone Research Center, where about 200 students and staff gathered to watch the historic 135th and final launch of the space shuttle program. "To be studying at the same university as where Capt.
NEWS
November 5, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Burton Paul, 76, of Princeton, a mechanical engineer and University of Pennsylvania professor emeritus, died Oct. 19 at the University Medical Center at Princeton of primary amyloidosis. Dr. Paul joined the Penn faculty in 1969 and later served as chairman of the department of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics. In the 1970s he made important contributions to mechanics relevant to the design of high-speed rail systems. He was adviser to a team of students in the 1980s that developed a mechanical hand with a delicate sense of feel.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard "Dick" Mortimer, 77, a Drexel University researcher, educator, and administrator, died Tuesday, July 2, of cardiac arrest at Paoli Memorial Hospital. In 1967, Dr. Mortimer became the first student to earn a Ph.D. at Drexel after completing his dissertation: "Axisymmetric motions of nearly flat shells of revolution. " "That moment was merely the midpoint of Dr. Mortimer's long and distinguished association with Drexel," said a January 2012 newsletter in the school's online archives.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert H. Creamer, 92, a founder of a forerunner of the College of Engineering at Temple University, died of lung failure Monday, July 25, at the Regency Retirement Village in Tuscaloosa, Ala., where he had lived for 12 years. It took a three-step process for today's College of Engineering to emerge. A 1966 Inquirer article said Mr. Creamer was at that time department chairman of mechanical engineering technology at Temple University's Technical Institute. A 1968 Inquirer article said that, while continuing as department chairman, he had become director of the institute.
SPORTS
January 31, 2012
WOULDN'T YOU say it's rather fitting that someone named Waters has committed to Navy? Despite the name, it wasn't a done deal all along, folks. T-J Waters, a 6-4, 225-pound senior linebacker from West Catholic, thought hard about Virginia Military Institute and West Chester, and even visited those schools before trekking last weekend to Annapolis, Md. But in the end, the Midshipmen won his heart. "When I saw how tight everyone was, the brotherhood, I knew Navy was the best place for me," Waters said.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than seven months after the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, the search for the plane is expected to resume in the Indian Ocean this month with crews trolling 23,000 square miles. Might the kernel of a better approach be found in a pond in Phoenixville? That is where Villanova University students are tinkering with a robotic boat, a two-pontoon craft equipped with a camera, a laser, and other electronics that let the boat locate obstacles and navigate on its own. The four-foot vessel is a prototype for a 16-foot version that the students and two faculty members will enter this month in a competition in Singapore, along with partners from Florida Atlantic University.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
While Michael Eisman was talking in Room 308 about his archaeological excavations, his daughter, Sharon, was signing off. "This is Sharon Eisman," said the seventh-grade student at Sandy Run Middle School, "reporting on Interest Day, 1989. " It was a wrap for Sharon, who had just finished her part in a video made Thursday. For the 15th year in a row, local residents came to the Upper Dublin school to talk about their professions and hobbies on Interest Day, a day for students to explore careers.
NEWS
July 9, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the shuttle Atlantis roared toward space Friday morning, more than 200 hearts soared with it at Drexel University's College of Engineering in honor of Christopher Ferguson, the shuttle commander and a graduate of the university. As the launch countdown ended at 11:29, a loud cheer erupted in the lobby of the Bossone Research Center at 32d and Market Streets, where about 200 students and staff gathered for a viewing party for the 135th and final launch of the space shuttle program.
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NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Central High School RoboLancers are accustomed to challenges. After building a sophisticated robot from scratch in six weeks, they recently won the highest honor their organization offers and a pass to its world championships. But therein lies another hurdle. The team of scrappy Philadelphia teenagers has two weeks to raise a daunting sum to make it to St. Louis and the FIRST Robotics World Championship: $35,000. For Stanley Umeweni, a senior who has "been in love with robotics since I got to Central," the competition has a larger meaning than just a chance to vie for a title.
SPORTS
December 1, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Baseball was the subject of a graphically rich ESPN SportsCenter segment last week, but it might easily have been physics. In a detailed dissection of Lorenzo Cain's best catches, the network employed such metrics as foot speed, ball acceleration, and the gradated circumferences of the area the Kansas City star and other outfielders could reasonably be expected to cover. Days later, the New York Times sports section included one story reimagining the arcane mathematical formula that gauges quarterback performance, another scrutinizing the economic and educational demographics of the most football-crazed states, and a third examining the statistics-based rationale behind the Patriots' penchant for deferring possession after successful coin tosses.
SPORTS
November 3, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5814
LUKE WHITE is used to creating things under pressure. The 5-8, 150-pound running back for Simon Gratz is actually a junior at Engineering and Science, which doesn't field a football squad. So it should come as no surprise that the Logan resident has his heart set on mechanical engineering. In fact, he's already made his own robot and worked on several other robotics programs when he was younger. However, in Gratz' 24-8 quarterfinal playoff victory last night against Northeast High, White had to make something out of nothing during a critical third down with about 3 minutes left in the fourth quarter.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than seven months after the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, the search for the plane is expected to resume in the Indian Ocean this month with crews trolling 23,000 square miles. Might the kernel of a better approach be found in a pond in Phoenixville? That is where Villanova University students are tinkering with a robotic boat, a two-pontoon craft equipped with a camera, a laser, and other electronics that let the boat locate obstacles and navigate on its own. The four-foot vessel is a prototype for a 16-foot version that the students and two faculty members will enter this month in a competition in Singapore, along with partners from Florida Atlantic University.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles F. Mengers, 94, of the Ogden section of Lower Chichester, a musician and former director of research for the Philadelphia Electric Co., died Tuesday, Sept. 9, of myasthenia gravis at his home. Born in Wilmington, Mr. Mengers grew up in Oaklyn and lived in Chester before moving to Ogden in 1950. He was a 1938 graduate of Collingswood High School, where he was a standout runner of the 100- and 220-yard dashes, and concertmaster of the orchestra. In 1942, Mr. Mengers earned a mechanical engineering degree from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. He did additional executive study at Columbia University and Dartmouth College.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred L. Glaudel, 90, of West Chester, a retired engineering manager for Westinghouse Electric Corp., died at his home Thursday, May 22, of complications from a heart ailment. He had moved to West Chester in 2008 to be with his daughter Annette after many years living in Lansdowne. Mr. Glaudel was born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, the youngest of 11 children. He graduated from Mahanoy City High School, and served in the Navy from 1943 to 1946 during World War II. He was deployed to the Pacific Theater aboard the submarine USS Haddock.
SPORTS
May 16, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
TEMPLE BASEBALL coach Ryan Wheeler calls this "absolutely" the most difficult thing he's ever been through. "They don't give you a manual on how to handle it," he said. They sure don't. The university first fielded a baseball team in 1927. This season will be the Owls' last. Last December, the program abruptly learned it had become the victim of athletic-budget cuts that also claimed softball and men's indoor and outdoor track and field. Men's crew and women's rowing were initially out as well, but later survived, thanks to an allocation of public and private funding.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
They got tired of lugging and wrestling with their bike locks, so they stopped riding entirely. Therein lay the germ of an idea for a group of seniors majoring in mechanical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania: Why not devise a bike lock you don't have to carry? This is senior-project presentation season for engineering students at schools such as Penn and Drexel University, when teams are evaluated on their ability to solve problems with elegance and simplicity. Diagnose the flu in less than 10 minutes, at a cost of $3. Treat spinal cord injuries with stem cells.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pei Chi Chou, 89, a nationally known engineering professor and a leader in the local Chinese American community, died of heart failure Thursday, Feb. 13, at Shannondell at Valley Forge in Audubon, Montgomery County, where he had resided for the last few years. Born in China's Hubei province in 1924, Mr. Chou came to the United States for graduate study in 1947, earning advanced degrees at Harvard and New York Universities, and soon decided to forge a career here. He joined Drexel University as an assistant professor of engineering in 1953.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU threw a party for Frank Hoffman, you'd better step aside. For his 98th birthday party at a daughter's home in West Deptford, N.J., 68 people crowded in, including family, friends and well-wishers. And there was no doubt that many present had benefited over the years from this man's incredible generosity and concern for all those who needed his special brand of caring. Francis H. "Frank" Hoffman, a mechanical engineer who kept the buildings humming for a number of Philadelphia companies, a passionate Phillies fan whose idea of a great time was chilling out on his patio in Crescentville to listen to a game, died Sept.
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