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NEWS
March 26, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
More than 100 residents of the Sanctuary development learned last night how to be good neighbors with rare and endangered timber rattlesnakes that will soon be coming out of winter hibernation to bask on fresh-cut lawns. The large crowd showed up last night at the Woodford Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge for a two-hour educational seminar on surviving the timber rattlesnake. They heard that the snake is not aggressive and is more likely to slither away scared than to take a snipe at someone.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | By Matthew Dolan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Steven W. McGarvey, who began his public-safety career in 1969 as a part- time janitor at a police station, was sworn in as township chief of police and director of public safety at last night's council meeting. McGarvey, a resident of Medford since 1963, became a Medford police officer in 1973 after graduating from the New Jersey State Police Municipal Basic Police Academy. Last night, he thanked his family, former Police Chief E. John Foulk, and members of the department.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A state administrative law judge will mediate a dispute between Medford officials and a developer over the town's plan to meet its affordable-housing obligation, a state agency ruled yesterday. The state Council on Affordable Housing (COAH) rejected developer Timothy Prime's request that the state turn down Medford's plan, a decision that would have sent the issue to a Superior Court judge and opened up the town to lawsuits from other developers. Instead, a state administrative law judge will hear the dispute and recommend to COAH how it should be resolved.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Looking for Boardwalk, Park Place or Pacific Avenue? Not on this board game. Let a roll of the dice take you instead to Spotts Hardware, Braddock's Tavern or the Craft Farm. This is the Game of Medford, and unlike most ventures modeled on Atlantic City, it's a nonprofit venture. It operates by the same rules as Monopoly. The Medford Emergency Squad is selling the board game to raise money for its new rescue truck, which cost about $80,000, not counting equipment. Local merchants have bought squares on the board, as a donation to the squad.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A plan for state-mandated low- and moderate-income housing may soon be implemented in the township. Township Solicitor John Almeida introduced a plan last night that would require 77 units of affordable housing to be included in new developments. According to Planning Board solicitor Thomas Norman, the New Jersey Council on Affordable Housing is likely to approve a 77-unit allotment for Medford. The council is an administrative agency that sets specific numbers of low- and moderate-income housing for each community.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Maple Shade man and a Philadelphia woman have been charged with four burglaries, in Lumberton and Medford, and Burlington County law enforcement officials said they were trying to determine whether the two were involved in more residential burglaries in those towns. Investigators identified the suspects as Carl Gosizk, 32, who lives at a motel on Route 73, and Josephine Dionne, 26. Gosizk, with bail set at $45,000, was being held in the Burlington County Jail. Dionne was released on her own recognizance.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
In the township manager's office overlooking Main Street in Medford, there was nothing to indicate in the last days of August that Richard Deaney was soon headed for a new job in a new city. Deaney, 47, announced his resignation in July as Medford's township manager and on Monday became the administrator of Ocean City in Cape May County. But with only three days left in Medford, plaques and memorabilia he had accumulated in his nine years in the position remained in place on the walls of his office and on his desk.
NEWS
May 20, 2009 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police yesterday identified Daniel Angelotti, 23, as the victim of a fatal accident Monday evening on Route 38 in Lumberton. Angelotti, of Medford, had exited a car stopped on the shoulder of westbound Route 38 and was attempting to cross the highway when he was struck by a tractor-trailer at 5:05 p.m., authorities said. He was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. Police said that Angelotti's fiance, Jessica Allard, was at the wheel when Angelotti rounded the rear of the parked Pontiac Vibe.
NEWS
July 30, 1988 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A 26-year-old Medford man was sentenced to seven years in prison yesterday for making sexual contact with a Tabernacle woman who successfully fought him off. Earlier this year in Burlington County Superior Court, Robert O'Neal pleaded guilty to aggravated sexual contact and burglary in a plea agreement in which charges of aggravated sexual assault were dropped. According to a report of the incident read in court, O'Neal waited until the woman's husband left for work on Nov. 6 and surprised the woman as she came out of the shower about 8:30 a.m. The woman struggled free and ran downstairs.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
When Mary Diesner was ready to start a full-time job last year, she was delighted that the Medford schools were offering extended child care. For the first time, parents could drop off their kids as early as 7 a.m - at the school they attended - and pick them up as late as 6 p.m. For Diesner, the pressure of worrying about her 9-year-old son's safety before and after school was lifted. The Extended Child Care Program, as it is called, was instituted in September 1989 under the auspices of the Medford school board.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of people crammed into a tiny community center in Medford on Sunday to see a Jewish scribe slowly ink the last 100 of the Hebrew letters on a Torah with a turkey feather. It was the first time that a Jewish scroll had been completed and displayed in Medford, a suburb that has not had a large Jewish presence. The special occasion was celebrated with a parade Sunday down Main Street to the new Chabad center. "There was no place for Jewish people to congregate before," said Barry Tuman, one of the founding members of the Chabad in Medford.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The idea of buying cemeteries to generate revenue did not immediately appeal to Medford Township officials when the owner first made the unusual offer in 2012. Digging out of financial problems by raising property taxes was one thing. Digging graves and cremating remains was another. But they mulled the projected earnings of Park View Cemetery at Historic Medford Village and Park View Cemetery at Kirby's Mill, and decided the idea had merit. Several weeks ago, township officials approved a letter of intent to buy the cemeteries for nearly $11 million and said the investment could generate more than $82.7 million over 50 years.
REAL_ESTATE
April 13, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tara Woodend wanted to buy and develop property in a South Jersey town where real estate would hold its value at the very least - or, she hoped, rise. The Medford native found an investor partner, and together they bought four dilapidated houses built in the 1920s in Haddonfield. She's living in one completed rehab now and developing the other three houses in similar fashion. The Wilkins Avenue properties line up along a small side street near the Haddonfield PATCO station. All four were dated and in need of an overhaul inside and out. Woodend, educated as an interior designer, could see the beauty beneath the old, rugged structures and gave each a two-story addition.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Andre was pleasantly surprised that there were women he didn't know at his friend's fall 2009 birthday party. Since he was single, he figured he'd mingle. "The first thing he asked me was if I was half-Japanese," Liana said. Asking such a question could have gone very, very badly for Andre, but Liana rolled with it. "I just said, oh, you're almost right. I'm half-Chinese. " She's also 100 percent Jersey Girl, from Medford. Andre was born in Philadelphia, but raised in the Philippines, where he lived with his father, the late Pol, and his grandmother Felicitas.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Even on an early spring morning still tightly wrapped in winter, Atsion Lake in Wharton State Forest has that "go home and get your kayak" look. The wind whipping the icy-cold, cedar-colored water over the edge of the deserted beach is enough to recommend a two-month postponement. But that means more time to explore the rest of Shamong, which has a long history and a great deal to look at. Leave enough time for a crab melt on rye for lunch at the Shamong Diner on Willow Grove Road and a visit to Valenzano Winery on Route 206, where you can sample the "Shamong Red. " In the Southern Unami dialect of the Leni-Lenape,   Shamong   means place of the horn , owing to the abundance of deer that sustained members of the tribe who lived there.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | Jan Hefler
The Pop Shop, a brightly decorated soda fountain and eatery that created a sensation when it opened in Collingswood a decade ago, is opening its second location in downtown Medford on Saturday. The owners have renovated the former Burlington County National Bank, built in 1837, and turned its vault into a soda fountain. The vault's 2,000-pound door displays shiny gears, giving the colorful Pop Shop an added attraction. "What's different from the Collingswood Pop Shop is, this one has two floors and soaring ceilings and four dining rooms," said Connie Correia, one of four owners.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Joseph Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Medford Township police are seeking help in finding two intruders who beat and bound a 64-year-old man during a home-invasion robbery over the weekend. The pair apparently arrived on bicycles and abandoned them, fleeing in the victim's 2010 Cadillac and an undisclosed amount of cash, police said. The break-in occurred about 10:30 p.m. Sunday at the home on Chief Massasoit Road, police said. The intruders duct-taped the resident to a chair and hit him with "a pipe or similar object," while demanding money, police said in a statement.
SPORTS
January 15, 2015 | By Mark Whited and Matt Hoffman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Shakwel Vincent scored 31 points on Tuesday afternoon, including seven three-pointers, as host Medford Tech rolled past Doane Academy, 101-66, in a nonleague boys' basketball game. Ronald Gaskin added 14 points. Aziz Parker and Bryan Isaiah Williams each contributed 11 points. In other nonleague action: Spencer Cook netted 13 points in Washington Township's 47-31 victory at Seneca. Justin Ortiz and Jerry Thompson each scored 10 points. Joe Beideman scored 21 points to lead Moorestown Friends in a 57-52 victory over LEAP Academy Charter at home.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Michael Boren and Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The day began with a robbery, and ended with a multicounty chase. The Medford News Shop on Stokes Road was the starting point. A man wearing a heavy brown coat and black pants barged into the Medford store around 9:05 a.m. Thursday, showing a handgun and demanding money. Once he had driven off, township police notified other agencies about his gold pickup. A few hours later, according to several people involved in the investigation, the suspect was found in Camden. Then came a pursuit that carved through Camden and Burlington Counties, and brought out multiple agencies - and a state police helicopter - before it ended around 1:30 p.m. in Wharton State Forest, where the suspect was caught after bailing from his vehicle, police said.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The young waitress at the Jersey Shore was not expecting to hear from her best friend after he boarded a plane to Greece to commit to a prearranged marriage in his home country. But there he was, this short-order cook, calling long-distance to say he had canceled the wedding. He had fallen in love with her at the diner where they both worked and during their strolls on the beach. After a storybook start 40 years ago, George and Colleen Catanakis' life together developed into a tale of sweat and perseverance as they opened several South Jersey diners.
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