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Median Age

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NEWS
July 21, 1998 | By Donna Leinwand, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
West Virginia has stayed ahead of Florida as home to the nation's oldest population - though not by much. According to census numbers released yesterday, the median age of residents of West Virginia is 38.1 years, the oldest in the nation for the second consecutive year. Florida is second oldest at 38 years, with Pennsylvania third at 37.3 years. In each state, half the residents are older and half younger than the median figure. As has been the case for several years, Utah has the youngest median age - 26.9.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | the Staff of Harper's Magazine
HARPER'S INDEX Some offbeat statistical data compiled by the staff of Harper's Magazine: Estimated number of Americans who had foreclosure proceedings initiated against them in 1991: 488,800. Chances that a white American earning less than $28,000 per year will be denied a mortgage: 1 in 4.3. Chances that a black American earning more than $42,000 per year will be denied a mortgage: 1 in 4.7. Percentage of Americans who believe that news coverage of the economy has had a "negative effect" on it: 49. Median age of a new mother in 1940: 23.2.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | By Rushworth M. Kidder
With little fanfare and less analysis, America recently passed another milestone. It turned 32. Or so says the Census Bureau, which has just announced that, as of last July 1, the population's median age reached 32.1 years. For the first time in its history, in other words, there are as many Americans above 32 as below. That puts the nation in a pretty exclusive club - up there with Sweden (median age 37.5) and West Germany (median age 37.7). The developing nations, by contrast, tend to be much younger: Kenya's median age is 19.2, and Mexico's is 22.7.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
LOWERING STRESS. Money may not buy happiness, but a study suggests that it certainly can reduce stress. Analyzing the results of a Harris poll, Sheldon Cohen, a psychology professor at Carnegie Mellon University, found that stress tended to decrease as age and household income increased. "The people who seem to be best off are in the $45,000- to $50,000-a-year range," Cohen says. LOWERING BLOOD PRESSURE. Eating potassium-rich fresh fruits and vegetables may prevent or lower high blood pressure.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, toward the end of his second tour of duty, U.S. Air Force Capt. Jonathan Wood was a valued asset to the mission. As a skilled intelligence officer, he monitored radio transmissions, analyzed data, and mapped targets, providing critical information used to combat terrorist cells in Afghanistan, Southeast Asia, and a few posts he is not at liberty to disclose. "I felt important," Wood said. And that self-satisfaction disturbed him. "Something was missing. " Two years later, instead of supporting the killing side of peacekeeping, he is studying to be a healer.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey's population is growing grayer, more unmarried partners are living together, and an increasing number of residents identify as Mexican or Asian Indian. These were just a few snapshots revealed in the latest U.S. Census information, released Thursday. Some of the most striking changes involve the growth of ethnic groups, which has helped fuel the increase in the region's diversity. Camden County College, for example, offers an "accent reduction" course in English, and the school just began offering a basic English class for continuing education.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | by Myung Oak Kim , Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania is not just a state with lots of elderly people. It's a state with lots of VERY old people, a new Census Bureau report said. Underscoring the long-term trend of an aging population, Pennsylvania's fastest-growing group is residents ages 85 and older, the Census report released today said. Pennsylvania saw the number of people in the oldest category jump 31 percent between April 1990 and July 1998, the report said. In contrast, the state's population of people ages 18-24 dropped 17 percent during the same period.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
American women are postponing marriage longer than ever before, tying the knot later than even their great-great grandmothers of the 1890s, the Census Bureau reported yesterday. The typical first-time bride is 23.3 years old when she goes to the altar, the highest median age for women to marry since the government started keeping statistics. And the median age of 25.5 for their bridegrooms hasn't been topped since 1900, according to the bureau. The study, "Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1985," also appeared to contain some favorable news for marriage-minded women, who were told in a heavily publicized Yale University study earlier this year that their chances of ever marrying were only 20 percent if they were still single at 30. Among adults ages 25 to 34, the bureau said, there were 119 unmarried women for every 100 unmarried men. For young adults ages 15 to 24, there were 112 unarried women for every 100 unmarried men. At age 35, unmarried women started to outnumber unmarried men. For adults between 35 and 44 years, there were 84 men for every 100 women.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1991 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
While Pennsylvania's overall population grew hardly at all between 1980 and 1990, the state's older population grew dramatically. During the decade, the number of Pennsylvanians 65 years of age and older grew by more than 298,000 - a 19 percent gain, according to figures from the U.S. Census Bureau scheduled for release today. The greatest growth among older residents was among what demographers call the "old old" - those 85 years of age and older. That group increased 32 percent between 1980 and 1990, according to census figures.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing were the Seattle Times and the Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service
Simply put, in the years ahead, there won't be enough younger workers to go around. So employers will have to depend more on older workers to fill the available jobs. Experts predict a bulge of aging baby boomers, coupled with slower growth of the population and total labor force. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: Between 1996 and 2006, the fastest-growing segment of the American work force will be aged 55 to 64. In 1996, the median age of workers nationwide was 38. By 2006, the median age will be 41. The gap between population growth and job growth is growing.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, toward the end of his second tour of duty, U.S. Air Force Capt. Jonathan Wood was a valued asset to the mission. As a skilled intelligence officer, he monitored radio transmissions, analyzed data, and mapped targets, providing critical information used to combat terrorist cells in Afghanistan, Southeast Asia, and a few posts he is not at liberty to disclose. "I felt important," Wood said. And that self-satisfaction disturbed him. "Something was missing. " Two years later, instead of supporting the killing side of peacekeeping, he is studying to be a healer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
TV shows live by the numbers and die by the numbers. At the moment, American Idol is being gashed with the Nielsen saber. Viewership for the Fox singing contest is down just more than 20 percent from last year at this time, and ratings in the adult demographic (18 to 49 years old) have dropped an alarming 33 percent. The best-case scenario for the network is that this is just a temporary aberration, that fans over time have grown weary of the audition stage, which serves as a long, pointless overture to the season, and that they will return once the real competition begins March 1. "I think American Idol 's slipping numbers reflect fatigue, especially among more engaged, savvy viewers, because the show is incredibly boring this year," Andy Dehnart, editor of the website realityblurred.com, says via e-mail.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Gary Rotstein, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Pennsylvanians are both marrying and divorcing at a lower rate than people in most of the rest of the country, a new U.S. Census Bureau report says. It's a quality they share with many men and women in the Northeastern United States. New Jersey was the only state with a lower rate for marriage and divorce for both men and women. The state's residents marry later, a choice viewed as more likely to make marriages last longer. Sociologists have found that factors such as age, income, religion, and education can play key roles in the timing and success of marriage.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Connie Cass and Stacy A. Anderson, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Baby boomers say wrinkles aren't so bad and they're not that worried about dying. Just don't call them old. The generation that once powered a youth movement isn't ready to symbolize the aging of America, even as its first members are becoming eligible for Medicare. A new poll finds three-quarters of all baby boomers still consider themselves middle-aged or younger. That includes most of the boomers who are ages 57 to 65. Younger adults call 60 the start of old age, but baby boomers are pushing that number back, according to the Associated Press-LifeGoesStrong.com poll.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey's population is growing grayer, more unmarried partners are living together, and an increasing number of residents identify as Mexican or Asian Indian. These were just a few snapshots revealed in the latest U.S. Census information, released Thursday. Some of the most striking changes involve the growth of ethnic groups, which has helped fuel the increase in the region's diversity. Camden County College, for example, offers an "accent reduction" course in English, and the school just began offering a basic English class for continuing education.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By John P. Martin and Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writers
The city is trending younger as the suburbs quickly grow older. There are fewer young children in the region. And Pennsylvania remains one of the grayest states. Those were some of the snapshots to emerge in new census data to be released Thursday. That the state shows signs of aging didn't surprise researchers or other officials who work daily with an older population. "It is something we absolutely are seeing," said Wanda Stonebraker, director the Chester County Department of Aging Services, which provides meals, medical assistance, and transportation for seniors.
NEWS
May 18, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the race among granny states, Pennsylvania has cemented its place as third oldest in the nation, according to new census data. The flip-flop when the Keystone State first dropped from second place went largely unnoticed. During the election last year, national news reports continued to refer to Pennsylvania as second oldest, citing the 2000 census. But for the fifth year in a row, about 15 percent of Pennsylvania's population was 65 or older last year, behind Florida's 17 percent and West Virginia's nearly 16 percent, population estimates released last week show.
NEWS
August 15, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
It's easy to be impressed by the China we've seen during the Olympics - the glittering, modern buildings; the futuristic maglev trains; the epic public works projects. On the surface, China has the physical capital of a rising world power. But the structure of China's human capital presents a very different picture. Over the next 40 years, China is headed for intense and rapid demographic change: Between now and 2050, China's population will shrink and become very, very old. There are no easy ways to manage this catastrophic problem.
NEWS
July 10, 2008 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Camden's Richard Fetters school building, built while Ulysses S. Grant was president and before Thomas A. Edison invented the incandescent lightbulb, children of the Lanning Square community have made do in classrooms tiny by today's standards. The layout is warren-like. Students and teachers walk through one classroom to get to another. In hot weather, the rooms are stifling. In 2007, the cold made pipes burst. The year before, severe weather and leaky pipes caused major damage to the gym floor.
NEWS
October 22, 2006 | By Stephanie Coontz
For the first time in 150 years, households headed by single adults and unmarried couples now outnumber married-couple families. In 1960, married-couple households represented more than 78 percent of American households. As late as 2000, married couples were 52 percent of all households. But in 2005, according to the recently released American Community Survey, households with a married couple at their core made up less than 50 percent of all households. That's a psychologically significant number, of course.
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