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Median Household Income

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NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
MORE Philadelphians are living in poverty today than a decade ago, and the city's median household income has plummeted, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates being released today. This comes even as there are more city residents who have their high-school diploma or GED, and more who have a bachelor's degree. The rise in poverty and the drop in income are especially stark among the city's African-American residents. The new estimates tell "us that Philadelphia is a pretty harsh place to grow up," said Mariana Chilton, a professor at Drexel University's School of Public Health and a national expert on hunger.
NEWS
August 27, 2004 | By Thomas Ginsberg, Frank Kummer and Dick Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Economic changes rippled across the region in the last three years, reining in growth in Bucks, Montgomery and Chester Counties while boosting Delaware County and South Jersey, new census data show. Philadelphia, still the troubled economic heart of the region, managed to improve its national standing in median household income - but not in poverty. Median household income across the region remained essentially flat at $50,050, while poverty rose 9 percent, leaving a new picture of economic health in some suburbs like Chester County.
NEWS
January 28, 1992 | Harper's magazine
Some offbeat statistics compiled by the staff of Harper's magazine: Percentage increase, during 1991, in the number of New Hampshire residents receiving food stamps: 47. Average attendance at the largest rally held by each Democratic candidate in New Hampshire last November: 350. Number of people who attended a Ralph Nader rally in Nashua, N.H., in November: 600. Number of times Bill Clinton used the term "middle class" in the...
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Dylan Purcell, and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Growing up in Jenkintown in the 1970s, Kate Pettit could easily cross Old York Road, from her mother's fabric store to a friend's house, on foot. Those days, however, are gone. Mom-and-pop shops like her mother's have been replaced by big-box retailers. And Jenkintown's main street has turned into a traffic-clogged artery better known as Route 611. "A customer was in here just this morning saying she felt like she lived in the city," said Pettit, who manages a toy store in downtown Jenkintown.
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Rita Giordano and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
About 1 p.m. each day, the job-search app on Jennifer Brestle's Samsung Galaxy sends her an alert. "Every day, there's a little bit of hope," the Voorhees resident said. Since Sept. 30, when she lost her job at CVS after 21 years, Brestle has been looking. And looking. "I've had a couple offers, but they were nowhere near the money I was making," Brestle, 41, said. "Not even close. I couldn't even pay my rent. " Across South Jersey, Southeastern Pennsylvania, and the nation, people such as Jennifer Brestle are the faces of an economic recovery that for many, despite encouraging job-growth reports, has been little more than a hollow promise.
NEWS
August 31, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg, Reid Kanaley and Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gaps in wealth widened across the Philadelphia region last year, leaving Philadelphia among the nation's poorest counties and Chester, Burlington and Bucks among its richest, the Census Bureau said yesterday. The Dickensian disparity indicated that economic recovery has been very spotty following the 2000-02 recession. Nationwide between 2003 and 2004, poverty worsened from 12.5 percent to 12.7 percent. Median household income was essentially flat at $44,684, the second consecutive year it showed no change, officials said.
NEWS
August 29, 2007 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Senior Writer
The national poverty rate fell slightly last year, its first decline in a decade, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released yesterday. Yet while the median household income rose, it remained below 1999 levels in terms of buying power, and real wages fell for a third straight year. "I'm putting in longer and longer hours, and I'm looking for a second part-time job," said Donna Waldemarra, 44, of Newtonville, N.J., who works as a receptionist at a car dealership. "It's very tight.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1995 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The poverty rate fell in 1994 for the first time in four years, the Census Bureau reported yesterday, but median income remained stuck - a sign that gains from a surging economy are not getting through to all middle-class households. The Census Bureau also found that nearly one in seven Americans - 39.7 million people - lacked health insurance in 1994, about the same as the previous year. Single mothers and black families gained ground in 1994, but full-time workers and single people living alone fell behind economically.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Stephanie Banchero, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Montgomery County residents can take comfort in the fact that they still live in the richest county in the state. According to figures released by the county planning staff last week, per capita income in the county climbed by more than 34 percent, adjusting for inflation, during the 1980s, from $9,727 in 1979 to $21,990 in 1989. The next closest county is Chester, with a per capita income of $20,601 - a 40 percent increase, again adjusting for inflation, over its 1979 figure of $8,763.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The corridor between the Delaware River and the Amtrak rail lines should be the focus of Delaware County's development efforts in the next 10 years, officials of a county-retained planning firm told County Council members Wednesday. Council Chairman Thomas McGarrigle agreed, noting the recent loss of oil-refinery jobs in that corridor. Theresa K. Sparacino, vice president of the Delta Development Group of Mechanicsburg, Pa., speaking to council members and an audience of civic leaders, went further, offering a menu of the county's promising demographics.
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NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Rita Giordano and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
About 1 p.m. each day, the job-search app on Jennifer Brestle's Samsung Galaxy sends her an alert. "Every day, there's a little bit of hope," the Voorhees resident said. Since Sept. 30, when she lost her job at CVS after 21 years, Brestle has been looking. And looking. "I've had a couple offers, but they were nowhere near the money I was making," Brestle, 41, said. "Not even close. I couldn't even pay my rent. " Across South Jersey, Southeastern Pennsylvania, and the nation, people such as Jennifer Brestle are the faces of an economic recovery that for many, despite encouraging job-growth reports, has been little more than a hollow promise.
NEWS
March 16, 2015
ISSUE | ELEPHANTS Ringside decision Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey says elephants will leave the traveling circus because consumers have spoken, but a shadowy, Washington-based spin factory with a history of fighting for smoking, obesity, drunken driving, and cruelty is still stuck in the past ("Activists paid up, the elephants go," March 11). Yes, a number of animal groups reached a settlement with the circus to end years of costly litigation. Ringling's decision to retire the elephants follows that settlement and comes on the heels of cities such as Los Angeles and Oakland banning the use of bullhooks.
NEWS
November 6, 2014
YOUR PAPER recently published an oped by Chad Dion Lassiter, the President of Black Men at Penn School of Social Work, that called real-estate development company Templetown Realty and Temple University, "the new Jim Crow. " The objective of Mr. Lassiter's letter is to raise awareness of the allegedly heavy-handed tactics used by the realty company and Temple to displace the poor African-American community that surrounds the campus, and to call for a campaign of civil disobedience against the university's expansion efforts.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The corridor between the Delaware River and the Amtrak rail lines should be the focus of Delaware County's development efforts in the next 10 years, officials of a county-retained planning firm told County Council members Wednesday. Council Chairman Thomas McGarrigle agreed, noting the recent loss of oil-refinery jobs in that corridor. Theresa K. Sparacino, vice president of the Delta Development Group of Mechanicsburg, Pa., speaking to council members and an audience of civic leaders, went further, offering a menu of the county's promising demographics.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
HERE'S A QUESTION: Have you seen your first 2013 paycheck (if you're lucky enough to have one)? Notice anything? Like, less money in your take-home pay? And - be honest - did you know that was coming? Or did you think that since you don't make $400,000, you were held harmless when we didn't dive off the "fiscal cliff"? "I think people will be surprised," says veteran economist David Kautter, managing director of American University's Kogod Tax Center. "It's one thing to listen to debates about taxes and spending, but it's not real until it impacts you. " You now may know that what happened to your paycheck is part of the deal between Congress and the White House.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
WE, THE PEOPLE . . . aren't sleeping very well. An election is upon us, and the country is at a crossroads, with lots of challenging problems that we worry won't get solved. The Daily News People's Editorial Board had a hard time deciding on just one or two issues we think the president should make priorities, so we decided each of us would make our case. Here's what's keeping us up at night:   This is a great country of inventors and creators. We invented a way of governing ourselves that has been an inspiration for freedom-loving people all over the world.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty rose significantly in Philadelphia and its surrounding counties over the last two years, while the city's median household income in 2011 ranked second-worst among the nation's 25 largest cities. The findings were released Thursday in the American Community Survey One-Year Estimate, an annual sampling of three million people conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The report has a higher margin of error than the census, which is a separate undertaking. "These are very bleak and disconcerting statistics," said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, the economic-consulting firm in West Chester.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
An alarming new study shows more New Jersey residents than ever are struggling to provide for their families. A record 885,000 people in the state lived below the poverty line in 2010, according to the study released Sunday by the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute. The poverty rate increased from 9.4 percent in 2009 to 10.3 percent in 2010, based on the latest census figures available. Among the poor were 300,000 children, the state's most vulnerable and neediest residents.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2011 | By Dave Carpenter, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Americans have been forced to take a crash course in money management, and class is still in session. Falling home prices and rampant foreclosures. Flat wages and high unemployment. Volatile stock prices and no safe refuge for savings. An unforgiving recession and the threat of a sequel. One economic challenge after another has tested the financial strength of most everyone in recent years. Although results are mixed, many families have shown they are up to the task.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
MORE Philadelphians are living in poverty today than a decade ago, and the city's median household income has plummeted, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates being released today. This comes even as there are more city residents who have their high-school diploma or GED, and more who have a bachelor's degree. The rise in poverty and the drop in income are especially stark among the city's African-American residents. The new estimates tell "us that Philadelphia is a pretty harsh place to grow up," said Mariana Chilton, a professor at Drexel University's School of Public Health and a national expert on hunger.
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