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NEWS
March 14, 1996 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
With the death Monday of "Ben Casey" star Vince Edwards, we're reminded how much has changed in medicine - and TV medical dramas - since Ben Casey and Richard Chamberlain's "Dr. Kildare" first turned America into their waiting rooms in the fall of 1961. While 35 years ago Americans might reasonably have expected to see the same doctor from cradle to grave, the advent of HMOs and other managed-care plans, as well as an ever-growing host of medical specialties, means we're now lucky if we see the same doctor from appointment to appointment.
NEWS
August 19, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Summer is being very, very good to the folks at CBS' "48 Hours. " An original episode of the Dan Rather-anchored newsmagazine last week pulled to within three-tenths of a ratings point of a repeat of NBC's medical drama, "ER. " As expected, reruns of "ER" this summer have lost more than half the audience that usually tunes in for the show during the regular September-through-May season. That's good news for "48 Hours," which actually is up from its in-season performance.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They live in different worlds, but Jamie Bamber's character as brain surgeon Tyler Wilson on TNT's new medical drama, Monday Mornings , has a lot in common with Lee Adama, the take-no-prisoners fighter pilot he played on Battlestar Galactica . Heroic to a fault, both pull off miraculous saves when the odds are stacked against them. They're mavericks with little regard for procedural tradition. And they're both cocky. "Oh, and they both use lasers, though Tyler Wilson's is a surgical laser," Bamber, 39, jokes in a phone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Actor-comedian Jamie Kennedy is better known for cracking jokes than cracking chests, but starting Tuesday, he'll be playing a doctor in NBC's new medical drama Heartbeat . And not just any doctor: Kennedy's character is a cardiothoracic surgeon. "I'm cracking chests, and I'm also [operating on] muscle and tendon. I forget the actual name of it. But he [his character, Evelyn Callahan], has two boards," meaning he's certified in two specialties, the Upper Darby native said in an interview after an NBC news conference in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Broadcast television, fall 2000: the Cold Pizza Season. Not that there's anything wrong with that, as they said on Seinfeld a few years ago, when originality still counted for a few points on TV. You know, left over in the fridge, crust a little too chewy, cheese congealed, forever trapping the pepperoni, soggy mushrooms and not-so-green-anymore peppers, as islands in the cold-sauce sea of red tomato. Forty degrees, with some good coffee - mmm, mmm, day-old pizza may not be the apex of the pie-maker's art, but it can be one fine breakfast.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
The overall stability of any structure depends on the strength of its core, and in the network TV business, the core is the returning shows, which outnumber new ones by about 2 to 1. "It's really how the returning shows perform that determines whether the network is going to move up or decline in the overall standings," said Steve Sternberg, a senior partner at ad buyer TN Media. "When you have a new show that flops, more times than not, it's replaced with a show that does better.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
With their lovely photography, pretty frocks, and polite manners, British costume dramas such as Downton Abbey make life in the pre-penicillin era look so awfully inviting we'd all love to visit. But would we? "In 1900 New York, there was 60,000 gallons of horse urine on the streets on any given day," said Michael Begler, "and 2.5 million pounds of manure. " Begler and his longtime collaborator Jack Amiel are the creators and writers of an entirely different sort of period drama, Cinemax's The Knick , a medical drama about the doctors, nurses, and patients of New York's Knickerbocker Hospital in the first years of the 20th century.
NEWS
January 25, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo was released from the hospital yesterday, clearing the way for his federal corruption trial to resume on schedule tomorrow. A spokesman for Hahnemann University Hospital, which admitted the 65-year-old Fumo on Thursday after he became dizzy and nauseated in court, said his condition had improved. Before Fumo went home, his health status was upgraded yesterday to good from fair. "We're going to court on Monday," Dennis J. Cogan, the leader of Fumo's defense team, said yesterday.
NEWS
May 16, 2002 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Trying to steal a few ratings points, CBS yesterday announced four new cop shows, all dramas, to go along with a medical drama and a couple of sitcoms. That's Life, the spunky family drama that featured Ellen Burstyn and Paul Sorvino, got killed, breaking the hearts of its fervent (though small) audience. So did The Education of Max Bickford, a one-year wonder that starred Richard Dreyfuss. Also gone, and less likely to be missed: Family Law and First Monday. The network hung onto two other relative ratings lightweights, The Agency and - fans will sing hallelujah - Touched by an Angel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rare amalgam of the medical and the supernatural, NBC's Saving Hope starts out with a bang. That's a teaser, because I'm not going to give away the show's bombshell first act. Except to say that I don't think I've ever seen a bride and groom take a taxi to their own wedding. When the sirens have quieted, we are left with the following premise: Dr. Charlie Harris (Michael Shanks), the charismatic and curiously muscular chief of surgery at Toronto's Hope Zion Hospital, is laying unresponsive in a coma.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Actor-comedian Jamie Kennedy is better known for cracking jokes than cracking chests, but starting Tuesday, he'll be playing a doctor in NBC's new medical drama Heartbeat . And not just any doctor: Kennedy's character is a cardiothoracic surgeon. "I'm cracking chests, and I'm also [operating on] muscle and tendon. I forget the actual name of it. But he [his character, Evelyn Callahan], has two boards," meaning he's certified in two specialties, the Upper Darby native said in an interview after an NBC news conference in January.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
With their lovely photography, pretty frocks, and polite manners, British costume dramas such as Downton Abbey make life in the pre-penicillin era look so awfully inviting we'd all love to visit. But would we? "In 1900 New York, there was 60,000 gallons of horse urine on the streets on any given day," said Michael Begler, "and 2.5 million pounds of manure. " Begler and his longtime collaborator Jack Amiel are the creators and writers of an entirely different sort of period drama, Cinemax's The Knick , a medical drama about the doctors, nurses, and patients of New York's Knickerbocker Hospital in the first years of the 20th century.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* NY MED. 10 tonight, 6ABC.   NEW YORK - Acting student Juan Vasquez never expected to make his national television debut lying on an ER bed at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, looking up at Dr. Mehmet Oz. But there he is tonight in the return of ABC's "NY Med," one moment running through his medical history - and theater credits - for the daytime talk-show host, there in his lesser-known role of cardiothoracic surgeon, and the next...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
SUMMER TV: It's not all about the singing and dancing anymore. Or even about the sitting around watching other people sit around - waiting for someone to say or do something incredibly inappropriate. All those remain on the menu, but it says something about how seriously some broadcasters are finally taking the cable-spurred trend toward year-round programming that when CBS Corp. CEO Leslie Moonves met with advertisers at New York's Carnegie Hall two weeks ago, the first schedule he talked about wasn't the fall's, but the summer's, reminding ad buyers that "Under the Dome" drew more viewers last summer than NBC's freshman hit "The Blacklist" did in the regular season.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They live in different worlds, but Jamie Bamber's character as brain surgeon Tyler Wilson on TNT's new medical drama, Monday Mornings , has a lot in common with Lee Adama, the take-no-prisoners fighter pilot he played on Battlestar Galactica . Heroic to a fault, both pull off miraculous saves when the odds are stacked against them. They're mavericks with little regard for procedural tradition. And they're both cocky. "Oh, and they both use lasers, though Tyler Wilson's is a surgical laser," Bamber, 39, jokes in a phone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rare amalgam of the medical and the supernatural, NBC's Saving Hope starts out with a bang. That's a teaser, because I'm not going to give away the show's bombshell first act. Except to say that I don't think I've ever seen a bride and groom take a taxi to their own wedding. When the sirens have quieted, we are left with the following premise: Dr. Charlie Harris (Michael Shanks), the charismatic and curiously muscular chief of surgery at Toronto's Hope Zion Hospital, is laying unresponsive in a coma.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | Ellen Gray
THE L.A. COMPLEX. 9 p.m. Tuesday, CW Philly 57. SUMMER ARRIVES a little early on the CW and with it, the Canadians. "Smash" meets "Melrose Place" in Tuesday's premiere of "The L.A. Complex," a guilty pleasure of a Canadian drama set in Los Angeles about (mostly) young people trying to make it in show business and, of course, with each other. Northern imports like ABC's "Rookie Blue" and CBS' "Flashpoint" have become one way U.S. networks keep the lights on between seasons when their cable rivals are at their most aggressive.
NEWS
June 5, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
Viewer neglect. It's the leading cause of death among TV series. While publicity hogs 24 and Lost got 21-gun send-offs, sadly a number of shows recently met the Grim Reaper of cancellation largely unremarked. As Willy Loman's wife insisted in Death of a Salesman , attention must be paid. So, we offer a few final words for these prime-time foot soldiers. Henceforth, Heroes will be hard to find. It's always tragic when a promising show peaks early.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Two of John Crowley's children have a fatal neuromuscular disorder, Pompe disease. Doctors tell John his son has months to live, his daughter perhaps a year. His is a Sophie's Choice . Should he spend what little time his children have left on earth with them? Or should the Bristol Myers-Squibb executive work around the clock pushing scientists and venture capitalists to produce a drug that might prolong their lives? Such is the premise of Extraordinary Measures , inspired by a gripping true-life story and brought to the screen by Tom Vaughan ( Starter for 10 )
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a long, wild gurney ride it's been! NBC's celebrated medical drama, ER, ends its 15-season, 332-episode run tonight with a two-hour finale (preceded by a one-hour clip-trip down Memory Lane). To give you some sense of what an eternity that is in broadcast terms, some of ER's coevals from the Class of '94 include Party of Five, Friends, Touched by an Angel, and My So-Called Life. There are many reasons for ER's longevity. The series had legs . . . and arms, internal organs, sucking chest wounds, and every other injury and ailment imaginable.
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