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Medical Education

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NEWS
August 18, 1991
Here's a short list of Philadelphia's public health problems: Eighteen- month waits for life-saving mammograms. Hit-and-miss prenatal care. Children who don't get measles shots. Not enough birth-control education. Thousands of people without insurance. Drug-abuse and all of its attendant ills. The city has cutting-edge medical wonders, too. Top-flight medical schools. Teaching hospitals in every quadrant. Pharmaceutical research labs. We've complained before that the needs and wonders seem to exist in two worlds, disconnected and estranged.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
J. Benedict O'Connell, 53, of Doylestown Township, head of a medical education company, died Monday in Harrisburg while on a business trip. "Ben was a truly unique individual who had the absolute respect and admiration of many medical faculty members around the country," said Richard P. Lewis, president-elect of the American College of Cardiology. Mr. O'Connell was born in Windsor, Conn. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from Fairfield (Conn.) University and did postgraduate work in pharmacology, administration, medical preceptorship and cardiology training at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. He had resided in Doylestown Township for 12 years.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mail room without mailboxes. A library with few hard copies of books and magazines. Gleaming metal tables for dissecting cadavers, with flat-screen monitors overhead. And just one lecture hall, which its users will try to avoid as much as possible. These are just a few hallmarks of the changing way that new doctors will learn their trade, at least in Camden. Tuesday marks the grand opening for Cooper Medical School of Rowan University and its new, publicly funded, $139 million building.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Rowan University is preparing to take the first steps toward creating a medical school campus in Atlantic City, extending the footprint of its growing medical programs and potentially tapping a new student base there. Rowan trustees are set to vote Wednesday on a feasibility study to explore an Atlantic City partnership between the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and AtlantiCare. Trustees will vote on awarding a contract to the Pittsburgh-based consulting firm Tripp Umbach to conduct the study "to understand the impacts associated with a potential four-year branch campus of a medical school," according to the agenda for Wednesday's board meeting.
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Rehrmann is such a believer in organ donation that he ran a full-page ad in Tuesday's Inquirer urging people to follow his example and register as a donor. "Think of the incredible relief of human suffering you will have helped bring about," the 84-year-old retired aeronautical engineer wrote in the $3,700 advertisement, published in Pennsylvania editions. Alas, his altruistic promotion contained some misinformation about how to register. And it turns out that he actually signed up to give his body for medical education, not organ donation.
NEWS
December 9, 2002 | By Charles E. Sessa Jr
In light of recommendations by the Health Science Commission and the proposed merger of Rutgers University with New Jersey's medical schools, it's important to recognize the role of the Cooper Health System as an academic medical center serving Camden and South Jersey. The commission would have benefited by including representatives from South Jersey. Its report contains oversights regarding the significant impact of medical education on the health-care delivery system in South Jersey.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Medical education is in a crisis. According to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine, half of 4,287 students surveyed at seven medical schools experienced burnout and 10 percent expressed suicidal ideation. And doctors aren't much better off; a second study in JAMA Internal Medicine of 7,288 physicians showed that almost half had experienced some symptom of burnout. The public image of doctors hasn't fared well, either. While the popular notion of doctors was once the wise and avuncular Marcus Welby, M.D., more recent portrayals tend toward Dr. Gregory House, a brilliant but annoying know-it-all with a decided God complex.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry J. Tumen, 92, of Center City, an internationally renowned specialist in digestive disorders, an esteemed clinician and an educator at Graduate Hospital for more than 65 years, died Friday at the Unitarian Universalist House in Germantown. Dr. Tumen was a pioneer in developing gastroenterology as a medical specialty and served as chairman of the American Board of Internal Medicine's Gastroenterology Board from 1958 to 1960. He published 134 articles and book chapters and was a consulting gastroenterologist for many years at the Albert Einstein Medical Center and the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2003 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood announced yesterday that it would break ground tomorrow on a medical education center paid for, in part, with a $10 million grant from the Annenberg Foundation of St. Davids. Construction of the three-story education center - to be named the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Conference Center for Medical Education - will cost $11.2 million. More than half that, $6.5 million, comes from the Annenberg grant with the remainder from the hospital and its foundation and a $500,000 grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts.
NEWS
May 22, 2007 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daniel S. Fleisher, 80, of Philadelphia, a pediatric kidney specialist who pioneered methods for teaching and evaluating doctors, died of cancer Wednesday at his home. Over his career, Dr. Fleisher headed medical education programs across the country. He was a consultant to the World Health Organization, and was deeply involved with the youth organization Woodrock Inc. Professionally, he focused on quality assurance - improving the teaching of medicine and the assessment of doctors' skills.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
THEODORE J. BERRY, 98, a Main Line physician, author, and educator, died Thursday, July 14, of pneumonia at his home in Naples, Fla. Dr. Berry lived in Villanova and then Bryn Mawr before moving to Naples in 1999. He was a prominent figure at Bryn Mawr Hospital for 45 years, practicing internal medicine and serving for a time as chief of staff. He retired in 1993 as director of medical education. Although Dr. Berry was hard-driving and productive, he also was very genial. Quietly and discreetly, he was physician and friend to the Main Line's elite families.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Rowan University is preparing to take the first steps toward creating a medical school campus in Atlantic City, extending the footprint of its growing medical programs and potentially tapping a new student base there. Rowan trustees are set to vote Wednesday on a feasibility study to explore an Atlantic City partnership between the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and AtlantiCare. Trustees will vote on awarding a contract to the Pittsburgh-based consulting firm Tripp Umbach to conduct the study "to understand the impacts associated with a potential four-year branch campus of a medical school," according to the agenda for Wednesday's board meeting.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Medical education is in a crisis. According to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine, half of 4,287 students surveyed at seven medical schools experienced burnout and 10 percent expressed suicidal ideation. And doctors aren't much better off; a second study in JAMA Internal Medicine of 7,288 physicians showed that almost half had experienced some symptom of burnout. The public image of doctors hasn't fared well, either. While the popular notion of doctors was once the wise and avuncular Marcus Welby, M.D., more recent portrayals tend toward Dr. Gregory House, a brilliant but annoying know-it-all with a decided God complex.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, toward the end of his second tour of duty, U.S. Air Force Capt. Jonathan Wood was a valued asset to the mission. As a skilled intelligence officer, he monitored radio transmissions, analyzed data, and mapped targets, providing critical information used to combat terrorist cells in Afghanistan, Southeast Asia, and a few posts he is not at liberty to disclose. "I felt important," Wood said. And that self-satisfaction disturbed him. "Something was missing. " Two years later, instead of supporting the killing side of peacekeeping, he is studying to be a healer.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concetta Harakal, 90, of Haverford, professor emerita of pharmacology at Temple University Medical School, died Friday, Dec. 27, of a heart attack at Devon Manor. Dr. Harakal began her career at Temple University School of Medicine in 1951 and over the next 50 years became a professor of pharmacology, course director of both the dental and medical school pharmacology programs, and director of pharmacology graduate studies. Even after becoming a professor emerita in 1995, she remained active on the admissions committee, and continued to lecture and attend pharmacology classes.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Lahoda grew up poor during the Depression on a Susquehanna County, Pa., farm, and his summer work on roads wasn't enough to pay for college. So after he served in the postwar military in the 1940s, he used the GI Bill to help pay for college and medical school bills. That still wasn't enough. So he rejoined the military for several years to complete his medical education on the way to becoming a civilian physician. On Sunday, July 7, Joseph G. Lahoda, 87, of Cinnaminson, a South Jersey obstetrician and gynecologist from 1964 to his retirement in 1997, died at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center of complications from a neurological disease.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The contestants sat clustered in teams, viewing the game board projected on the classroom wall and waiting to pounce on a buzzer if they knew the answer. This was clearly no match for amateurs. "What is the average volume of the adult cranial vault, plus or minus 200 ml?" asked Bernie Lopez, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's own Alex Trebek. The Pen Is Mightier - an all-male team of first-year emergency medicine residents, who took their name from a Saturday Night Live skit - was the first to buzz in. It had 10 seconds to answer.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | Associated Press
The governing boards of Rutgers University on Monday approved absorbing most of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, a major step in the overhaul of the state's higher education system. The Board of Governors and Board of Trustees accepted the changes called for in a law signed by Gov. Christie in August. "The new Rutgers will expand biomedical research across our state, enhance medical care for our citizens, and create new opportunities in the biotechnical and pharmaceutical industries," Ralph Izzo, chairman of the Board of Governors, said in a statement.
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