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Medical Equipment

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NEWS
June 22, 1991 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roberta Robinson was trusting when the call came: The woman on the line said she was updating Robinson's Medicare file. Robinson willingly answered her questions. "I very foolishly assumed this was an official call from, gosh, I don't know, President Bush," she said yesterday. Several months later, a huge box full of hundreds of dollars worth of medical equipment arrived. Robinson later learned the unsolicited equipment order had been justified to Medicare with a form saying she was virtually bed- bound in her Wayne home.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | Associated Press
MIAMI - Newborn twins airlifted from a Caribbean island were doing well and ready to make their way home to Burlington County, N.J., their doctors said Tuesday. Sydney and Serena Lazarus were born April 8 in Anguilla, where their parents were attending a wedding. Angela Lazarus' doctors had approved her travel even though she was 27 weeks pregnant with twins. Her due date was July 5. While on the island, Lazarus began experiencing pain and was rushed to a hospital, where she went into labor.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | By Alison F. Orenstein, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After being grounded in October in a dispute over cargo fees, a Cherry Hill couple are once again ready to take to the skies to deliver humanitarian aid to Ukraine. Roman and Anna Dashawetz expect to fly today to Kiev where they will deliver 250 boxes, four tons, of medical supplies to hospitals in their homeland. A trip scheduled for October was canceled by the couple and five other members of their group, Emergency Medical Aid to Ukraine, when, the Dashawetzes contend, Aeroflot increased their fee from 25 cents to $1 per pound of freight.
NEWS
February 25, 1993 | By Gary Cohn, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Atlantic City man pleaded guilty yesterday to participating in a scheme to defraud the Medicare system. Mark Mickman, 66, pleaded guilty to a single count of mail fraud, just as his trial was set to begin in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. In return for the guilty plea, prosecutors agreed to drop additional charges against him. According to a federal indictment, Mickman's company submitted claims for large quantities of durable medical equipment such as wheelchairs and knee and back braces - equipment that senior citizens neither needed nor requested.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The head of six defunct Philadelphia medical-supply companies was convicted by a federal jury yesterday of defrauding the Medicare program out of $3.4 million in a telemarketing scheme in which elderly people were sent medical equipment they did not need. The U.S. District Court jury deliberated eight hours Wednesday and yesterday before convicting John Cocivera of 144 counts of mail fraud, 28 counts of filing false claims, 32 counts of money laundering and one count of structuring bank deposits to evade currency reporting requirements.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1999 | By Claire Furia Smith, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nothing frustrates a physician in a Third World country more than having donations of modern equipment arrive with faulty electronics, unusable parts and ill-suited accessories. But some well-meaning charities continue to bombard developing nations with such useless donations, said Jeffrey Gloss. "It makes American aid look bad," said Gloss, who founded Carelift International in 1992 with his wife, Linda, with the goal of rebuilding health systems overseas. "You can't dabble in health care or you do more harm than good.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Interspec, a medical equipment manufacturer that is the borough's largest employer, will shutter its plant here and consolidate its operations with those of the Pacific Northwest company that recently acquired it. The move, announced last week by the firm, follows Interspec's merger in May with Advanced Technology Laboratories Inc. (ATL) of Bothell, Wash., a maker of ultrasound equipment for the medical industry. Most of Interspec's 250 employees will lose their jobs, company officials said.
NEWS
September 14, 2001 | By Angela Valdez INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Area military installations have been roused into action by this week's terrorist attacks. Most are supporting search-and-rescue efforts. Some would be among the first to mobilize for a military response. McGuire Air Force Base, in addition to acting as a hub for nearly 1,000 federal emergency workers and Air Force medics, is helping to refuel Air Force jets monitoring U.S. airspace. The Burlington County base has historically been one of the first units activated in times of crisis, said Tech.
NEWS
March 6, 2016
An East Falls doctor has been charged with a felony relating to the illegal issuance of prescriptions, the Pennsylvania State Police announced Friday. Edwin Rothman, 82, a doctor of osteopathic medicine with an office at 4209 Ridge Avenue, had been under investigation by the state police's Bureau of Criminal Investigation since 2013. Trooper Adam Reed said an undercover operation found that Rothman was handing out prescriptions for Percocet and other painkillers to people "without a valid reason ... in exchange for cash.
NEWS
March 18, 2011
Aramark Corp., Philadelphia, said today that its health-care unit bought Masterplan, a clinical technology management and medical equipment maintenance company. The purchase will expand Aramark Healthcare's business to service all levels of hospital clinical technology, from high-end imaging equipment to ordinary infusion pumps used in daily patient care. Terms of the acquisition were not disclosed, but Aramark said Masterplan, based in Goodlettsville, Tenn., has 400 employees who manage 300,000 pieces of medical equipment nationwide.
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NEWS
March 6, 2016
An East Falls doctor has been charged with a felony relating to the illegal issuance of prescriptions, the Pennsylvania State Police announced Friday. Edwin Rothman, 82, a doctor of osteopathic medicine with an office at 4209 Ridge Avenue, had been under investigation by the state police's Bureau of Criminal Investigation since 2013. Trooper Adam Reed said an undercover operation found that Rothman was handing out prescriptions for Percocet and other painkillers to people "without a valid reason ... in exchange for cash.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Bill Stephenson, a former office photocopier leasing agent turned chief executive, looks ahead, he sees a world increasingly threatened by resource scarcity - scarcity caused by today's wastefulness, as used-up products are trashed in landfills. Not surprisingly, for a man who has made a career in leasing everything from photocopiers to tractors to medical equipment to carpeting, Stephenson sees leasing as an important answer. Stephenson, 47, leads DLL Group, formerly De Lage Landen, a Dutch equipment-leasing company with its U.S. headquarters in Wayne.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 800 public comments - overwhelmingly negative - about Gov. Corbett's alternative Medicaid expansion proposal were submitted online by Friday's deadline, far more than for other states that offered less complicated plans. With the federal comment period over, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services technically could act at any time. But public-policy experts say that the complexity of this plan - the only one in the nation to link an expansion of coverage for a new population to changes in insurance, including benefit cuts, for some current Medicaid recipients - will likely lengthen negotiations that typically take months.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Empty factories, their gates chained, their windows shattered, their roofs open to the rain, their vacant yards overgrown, their machines rusted and broken in empty lots - the artifacts of Philadelphia's once proud manufacturing industry tell the sad story of what used to be and is no more. But in a bright aviation hangar in Northeast Philadelphia - a factory where dozens of helicopters are manufactured each year - the mood was upbeat Thursday as government officials and business leaders drew a brighter picture for the future of manufacturing in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
OK, HERE'S a joke for you. Why did Cory Booker cross the river? No seriously, why did Booker - Democratic mayor of Newark, huge favorite to win the election in October as New Jersey's next U.S. senator, and friend to Oprah and Mark Zuckerberg - cross the river into Philadelphia last night? Booker confessed to wondering the same thing after stealing the show at the 23rd annual Stu Bykofsky Candidates Comedy Night - but only after suffering through 90 minutes of the charity fundraiser, including the unique comic stylings of City Controller Alan Butkovitz.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
THERE are many ways that the U.S. government can save money, and one of them is to cease the disposing of medical equipment, such as wheelchairs, walkers, crutches, canes and other equipment that could be recycled to nursing homes and other such facilities. The V.A. Hospital at 38th and Powelton disposes them in Dumpsters, and that is a disgrace. If any employee attempts to salvage any of this equipment, they will be fired and at times prosecuted. I feel this is a disgrace, and something should be done to alleviate this practice.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | Associated Press
MIAMI - Newborn twins airlifted from a Caribbean island were doing well and ready to make their way home to Burlington County, N.J., their doctors said Tuesday. Sydney and Serena Lazarus were born April 8 in Anguilla, where their parents were attending a wedding. Angela Lazarus' doctors had approved her travel even though she was 27 weeks pregnant with twins. Her due date was July 5. While on the island, Lazarus began experiencing pain and was rushed to a hospital, where she went into labor.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former employee and patient who got abortions from Dr. Kermit Gosnell gave a Philadelphia jury Tuesday a graphic and sometimes grisly inside view of his West Philadelphia clinic. Adrienne Moton, 35, told the jury how she obtained two abortions from Gosnell as a teenager. She said she also lived with his family for a time before becoming a volunteer and then employee at Gosnell's Women's Medical Society. Though she had only a high school diploma, Moton described how Gosnell trained her to do ultrasound exams of patients, administer pre-surgical sedation, and assist in illegal late-term abortions.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly after 8:30 p.m. on Feb. 18, 2010, a federal-state task force raided a rambling three-story building in West Philadelphia suspected as the source of prescription narcotics flooding the streets. The agents who went into the Women's Medical Society at 3801 Lancaster Ave. found what they were looking for - and much more. Inside were boxes of medical waste, preserved fetuses, infant feet in specimen jars, and filthy medical equipment - what prosecutors allege was evidence of Kermit Gosnell's booming abortion clinic, where late-term pregnancies were illegally and murderously ended.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By David Klepper and Bob Salsberg, Associated Press
NEWPORT, R.I. - Travel eased and life slowly returned to normal for most New Englanders after a massive blizzard, but many remained without power in cold and darkened homes and a forecast of rain brought a new worry: Weight piling up dangerously on roofs already burdened by heavy snow. The storm that slammed into the region with up to 3 feet of snow was blamed for at least 14 deaths in the Northeast and Canada, and brought some of the highest accumulations ever recorded. Still, coastal areas were largely spared catastrophic damage.
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