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Medical Ethics

NEWS
May 8, 1990 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It is a case that challenges myriad legal precepts and medical ethics - what to do when a doctor has AIDS? From one perspective, disclosure is an incredible violation of a physician's right to keep his medical condition private. From the other perspective, disclosure is necessary to protect the doctor's patients from potential infection. "Can they be reconciled in this case?" Mercer County Superior Court Judge Philip S. Carchman mused yesterday. "Isn't that what this case is all about?"
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Charles J. McFadden, 80, a gentle, practical philosophy professor who taught at Villanova University for 40 years, died Tuesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. He had lived for the last 50 years at St. Thomas of Villanova monastery. Father McFadden, a member of the Augustinian order of priests and brothers, was "a kind of Mr. Chips in the classroom," said the Rev. Francis X. McGuire, retired president of Villanova and a longtime friend of Father McFadden's. He was "a scholar and gentleman," said Father McGuire, who was president of the university from 1944 to 1954.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. Francis J. Leonard, 60, pastor of Holy Maternity Roman Catholic Church in Audubon, died yesterday at St. Mary's Nursing Home, Cherry Hill. Born and raised in Camden, he was a graduate of Camden Catholic High School where he excelled in debating. He then attended St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia, Jordan Seminary in Menominee, Mich., St. Mary Seminary in Baltimore, and the University of Louvain in Belgium, where he earned his master's degree. He was ordained in 1963 at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Camden.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a well known bioethicist who has worked at the National Institutes of Health and served as a special adviser for health policy to the director of the White House Office of Management and Budget between February 2009 and January 2011, will join the University of Pennsylvania faculty on Sept. 1. Emanuel will have a slew of titles. Among them:  Diane v.S. Levy and Robert M. Levy University professor, vice provost for global initiatives and chair of the new department of Medical Ethics & Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Physician Budd B. Axelrod, 86, who maintained a North Philadelphia family medical practice for 50 years, died Tuesday, May 21, of Parkinson's disease at Virtua Voorhees Hospital. Dr. Axelrod resided in the independent-living section of Lions Gate, the retirement community in Voorhees. From 1953 to 2003, Dr. Axelrod ran his office in the 600 block of East Girard Avenue, near what is now the Girard Medical Center, his wife, Jeanette, said in a phone interview. For a time, she said, he was president of the medical staff at St. Mary's Hospital at Frankford Avenue and Palmer Street, which closed in 1988 and is now an apartment complex for low-income seniors.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The state ombudsman for the elderly yesterday announced that he would greatly limit his review of decisions to halt life support of nursing home patients. The announcement by Hector Rodriguez, ombudsman for the institutionalized elderly, reversed his earlier stance that had been sharply criticized by doctors, nurses, lawyers and nursing home administrators. He had declared in August that he would review all decisions to stop life support of elderly patients because of the "potential abuse" such cases may present.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
The frontier of medical ethics is a busy place. The heaviest activity these days is near the territory marked "the killing of innocents. " Last year Washington state came very close to passing a referendum to legalize euthanasia. Derek Humphrey's how-to suicide manual topped the best-seller list. Society is growing increasingly tolerant of the idea of cutting off the life of people who have had enough. Generally speaking, the moral pioneers seek to kill the innocent (the terminally ill, for example)
NEWS
May 19, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a career that spanned more than half a century, Rabbi Gerald I. Wolpe was best known for two things: leading one of the region's most influential synagogues, Har Zion Temple, and his contributions in the fields of medical ethics and caregiving. Rabbi Wolpe, 81, of Center City, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. In 1969, Rabbi Wolpe became the third rabbi to the lead the Conservative synagogue, which was then in Wynnefield. Four years later, he oversaw Har Zion's move to Penn Valley to accommodate young families in the suburbs.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania is taking another crack at one of medicine's thorniest issues: how to treat people who have no hope of recovery. The hospital's ethics committee has approved unusual new guidelines that include limits on high-tech treatment for patients with severe brain damage. Under the guidelines, intensive care would not routinely be given to patients in a persistent vegetative or minimally conscious state. Only patients who had explicitly requested such care would get it. The guidelines, which will not be implemented for at least a year, also say what the hospital will do for patients, both when there is hope for recovery and, later, when the goal shifts to providing good "hygiene, preservation of dignity, and alleviation of discomfort or suffering.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1976, Karen Ann Quinlan lay in a coma, kept alive by a respirator, when her parents asked the New Jersey Supreme Court to allow doctors to remove the machinery and let their daughter die. It was the first time the issue - with all of its medical, legal and ethical considerations - had come to a court of law. But to stop the medical treatment clashed with current thinking on medical ethics and law. "All of us had the belief we had...
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