CollectionsMedical Ethics
IN THE NEWS

Medical Ethics

NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A citizens' committee on medical ethics joined yesterday a growing chorus of voices criticizing the state ombudsman for the elderly and his review of all decisions to discontinue life support for dying nursing-home patients. The group's chairwoman, Mary Strong, said the review is unnecessary and delays such decisions. "That causes a great deal of anguish on the families," she said. "The nursing homes can do nothing for fear of the ombudsman. " She said that the review, ordered by Hector Rodriguez, the ombudsman for the institutionalized elderly, also contradicts the findings of an extensive survey released in the summer by her group, the Citizens' Committee on Biomedical Ethics.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New state guidelines that were intended to stop interference by the government in the decisions of nursing-home patients to die with dignity actually do just the opposite and should be scrapped, a blue-ribbon medical- ethics panel said yesterday. During a regular meeting of the New Jersey Bioethics Commission, members sharply criticized guidelines for living wills proposed last week by Health Commissioner Molly Joel Coye. One commission member said the proposal "defies any common sense.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Jason Nark and Daily News Staff Writer
IT TOOK A POLICE battering ram to bust down the door of the West Philadelphia apartment. Once inside, police discovered a colorful cache of psychedelic drugs — enough LSD to open thousands of "doors of perception" for six to eight hours at a time.   The Jan. 31 raid appeared to be a true flashback to a bygone era, with the federal Drug Enforcement Administration calling the 9,500 hits of LSD on tie-dyed images of Homer Simpson and Jerry Garcia an "anomaly" in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 16, 2008 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a lawsuit filed yesterday, a Camden County woman accused her orthopedic surgeon of "rubbing a temporary tattoo of a red rose" on her belly while she was under anesthesia. The patient discovered the tattoo below the panty line the next morning, when her husband was helping her get dressed to go home after the operation for a herniated disc, her attorney, Gregg A. Shivers, said in a phone interview yesterday. "She was extremely emotionally upset by it," said Shivers. The suit, filed on behalf of Elizabeth Mateo in Camden County Superior Court, seeks punitive and compensatory damages from Steven Kirshner, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon with offices in Marlton and Lumberton, both in Burlington County.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph Hassman, the Cherry Hill physician whose medical license was revoked after he tearfully pleaded guilty to the mercy killing last year of his terminally ill mother-in-law, has returned to work. At a sparsely attended and unpublicized hearing Oct. 14, the state Board of Medical Examiners unanimously reinstated Hassman's license after deciding that he had "demonstrated his rehabilitation," a board spokesman said yesterday. Hassman, a former member of the Cherry Hill Township Council, had admitted administering a lethal dose of drugs to his mother-in-law, Esther Davis, 80, as she lay in bed at the Linwood Convalescent Center in April 1986.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Catholic church condemned forms of reproductive technology such as test-tube fertilization and surrogate motherhood last week, it spoke with a finality that some specialists in medical ethics described as undermining the discussion of complex issues. The Vatican position "stifles dialogue," said Joyce Bermel, managing editor of the Hastings Center Report, published by the Hastings Center in Briarcliff, N.Y., a research institution that focuses on ethical issues in biology and medicine.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware Valley College will host three live interactive teleconferences this year on nursing in the 1990s. The first conference is set for 1 to 3 p.m. Feb. 3. Registration deadline is Jan. 14. The conference will address the issues, dilemmas and applications of monitoring techniques for acute and critically ill patients. Medial and nursing experts will discuss types of monitoring and ethical considerations. The second conference runs from 12:30 to 3 p.m. March 24. The panel will address medical ethics and health-care policy and will include a clinician, medical ethicist, theologian, lawyer and public policy expert.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The United States Senate, the most exclusive and august deliberative body in the land, squiggled the other day. Every year the good senators fill tens of thousands of pages with their thoughts, their musings and, most important, their actions. Those pages fill the voluminous Congressional Record, but today those pages are blank on one key point in a critical and controversial action taken Wednesday afternoon. The issue was abortion, and the Senate approved a bill that would allow family planning clinics to tell people that abortion is a legal option, even if those clinics receive federal financing.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | BY DENISE BIRD
The present attempt of the medical profession to force a woman to have a Caesarian section in order to save the life of her unborn child reflects the inconsistencies in the judicial system. It's ironic that women can obtain abortions at will, yet this woman cannot leave the life of her unborn child in the hands of the One who gives life. In both instances, the bureaucratic system is playing God. Lawmakers who are strangers to the mothers, and to the unborn children, are deciding whether these children will live or die. In these types of cases, the medical profession rules according to medical ethics, and the judicial system rules according to their interpretation of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
NEWS
September 9, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Most new infertility treatments are morally acceptable, but the practice of one woman bearing a child for another should be restricted, a medical ethics committee said yesterday. In the first major report examining the ethics of new reproductive technology, a committee of doctors, lawyers and ethicists said that practices such as artificial insemination and using donor sperm and eggs for producing test-tube babies were morally acceptable in most cases. However, the panel said some other procedures should be classified as experimental and not used routinely until more is known about them.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|