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Medical Ethics

NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New state guidelines that were intended to stop interference by the government in the decisions of nursing-home patients to die with dignity actually do just the opposite and should be scrapped, a blue-ribbon medical- ethics panel said yesterday. During a regular meeting of the New Jersey Bioethics Commission, members sharply criticized guidelines for living wills proposed last week by Health Commissioner Molly Joel Coye. One commission member said the proposal "defies any common sense.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph Hassman, the Cherry Hill physician whose medical license was revoked after he tearfully pleaded guilty to the mercy killing last year of his terminally ill mother-in-law, has returned to work. At a sparsely attended and unpublicized hearing Oct. 14, the state Board of Medical Examiners unanimously reinstated Hassman's license after deciding that he had "demonstrated his rehabilitation," a board spokesman said yesterday. Hassman, a former member of the Cherry Hill Township Council, had admitted administering a lethal dose of drugs to his mother-in-law, Esther Davis, 80, as she lay in bed at the Linwood Convalescent Center in April 1986.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2014
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts , Philadelphia, has elected K evin Kleinschmidt , a private investor and partner at Gabriel Investments, and Jeffrey Cook, chief financial officer at Pepsi Cola and National Brand Beverages Ltd., to its board. Friends of the Japanese House and Garden , the nonprofit that administers Shofuso, a traditional Japanese house and nationally ranked garden in West Fairmount Park, has named the following board members: Nobuki Iijima , architectural project coordinator, capital projects division of the Department of Public Property, City of Philadelphia; Kaori Ikeuchi , digital fabrication technician, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania; Kazayuki Morihata , founder/owner, Morihata International Ltd Co.; Masashi Uemura , vice president, corporate planning at Subaru of America; William Whitaker , curator and collections manager of the architectural archives at the University of Pennsylvania, and John Young , president, Tikaro Inc. Stradley Ronon partner Andrew K. Stutzman has joined the Strafford Banking & Finance Advisory Board . Stutzman chairs the firm's mortgage and lending litigation practice group.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Catholic church condemned forms of reproductive technology such as test-tube fertilization and surrogate motherhood last week, it spoke with a finality that some specialists in medical ethics described as undermining the discussion of complex issues. The Vatican position "stifles dialogue," said Joyce Bermel, managing editor of the Hastings Center Report, published by the Hastings Center in Briarcliff, N.Y., a research institution that focuses on ethical issues in biology and medicine.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware Valley College will host three live interactive teleconferences this year on nursing in the 1990s. The first conference is set for 1 to 3 p.m. Feb. 3. Registration deadline is Jan. 14. The conference will address the issues, dilemmas and applications of monitoring techniques for acute and critically ill patients. Medial and nursing experts will discuss types of monitoring and ethical considerations. The second conference runs from 12:30 to 3 p.m. March 24. The panel will address medical ethics and health-care policy and will include a clinician, medical ethicist, theologian, lawyer and public policy expert.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The United States Senate, the most exclusive and august deliberative body in the land, squiggled the other day. Every year the good senators fill tens of thousands of pages with their thoughts, their musings and, most important, their actions. Those pages fill the voluminous Congressional Record, but today those pages are blank on one key point in a critical and controversial action taken Wednesday afternoon. The issue was abortion, and the Senate approved a bill that would allow family planning clinics to tell people that abortion is a legal option, even if those clinics receive federal financing.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | BY DENISE BIRD
The present attempt of the medical profession to force a woman to have a Caesarian section in order to save the life of her unborn child reflects the inconsistencies in the judicial system. It's ironic that women can obtain abortions at will, yet this woman cannot leave the life of her unborn child in the hands of the One who gives life. In both instances, the bureaucratic system is playing God. Lawmakers who are strangers to the mothers, and to the unborn children, are deciding whether these children will live or die. In these types of cases, the medical profession rules according to medical ethics, and the judicial system rules according to their interpretation of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
NEWS
September 9, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Most new infertility treatments are morally acceptable, but the practice of one woman bearing a child for another should be restricted, a medical ethics committee said yesterday. In the first major report examining the ethics of new reproductive technology, a committee of doctors, lawyers and ethicists said that practices such as artificial insemination and using donor sperm and eggs for producing test-tube babies were morally acceptable in most cases. However, the panel said some other procedures should be classified as experimental and not used routinely until more is known about them.
NEWS
December 11, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry A. Shenkin, 92, an innovative neurosurgeon and an author, died Saturday at the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford, where he had lived for 18 years. Dr. Shenkin was founding director, in 1960, of the neurosurgical research laboratory at Episcopal Hospital. He was a professor at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and at Temple University Medical School, and maintained a private practice. In the early 1970s, he was responsible for the installation of the first CAT scanner in Philadelphia at Episcopal Hospital.
NEWS
April 25, 1994 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK MOM CHARGED IN HAMMER ATTACK ON TEEN A mother faces an attempted- murder charge for allegedly trying to beat her seriously ill 13-year-old daughter to death with a hammer. The mother then tried to overdose on medication for depression. "She just flipped," the mother's husband, Anthony Edwards, told New York Newsday in a story published yesterday. "It was the pressure. " Mary Edwards, 36, was unconscious and in critical condition yesterday at Brookdale Hospital.
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