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Medical Ethics

NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A citizens' committee on medical ethics joined yesterday a growing chorus of voices criticizing the state ombudsman for the elderly and his review of all decisions to discontinue life support for dying nursing-home patients. The group's chairwoman, Mary Strong, said the review is unnecessary and delays such decisions. "That causes a great deal of anguish on the families," she said. "The nursing homes can do nothing for fear of the ombudsman. " She said that the review, ordered by Hector Rodriguez, the ombudsman for the institutionalized elderly, also contradicts the findings of an extensive survey released in the summer by her group, the Citizens' Committee on Biomedical Ethics.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New state guidelines that were intended to stop interference by the government in the decisions of nursing-home patients to die with dignity actually do just the opposite and should be scrapped, a blue-ribbon medical- ethics panel said yesterday. During a regular meeting of the New Jersey Bioethics Commission, members sharply criticized guidelines for living wills proposed last week by Health Commissioner Molly Joel Coye. One commission member said the proposal "defies any common sense.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Lisa Black, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - Sue and Ben Erickson thought they were prepared after learning that their baby could be born with physical or mental disabilities. An ultrasound during the 36th week of pregnancy revealed an excess of cerebral fluid on the unborn infant's brain, but the young Huntley couple quickly accepted that God must have a special plan. They were overjoyed when Matthew Donald Erickson emerged from the womb on Dec. 11 in seemingly great form at just over six pounds. He wriggled his arms and legs, grimaced and scored high on the newborn checklist to assess health.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ezekiel J. Emanuel values intelligence, but don't accuse him of Harvard-itis. He'll tell you an Ivy League degree doesn't prove anyone's worth. "That's exactly what used to drive me crazy at Harvard," he snaps, a place where many students believed, "I got into Harvard. I've arrived!" "You have been given the privilege of the best education in the world!" he'd say. "Your obligation is to take that and do something good for the world! You've only got a limited time on this earth.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Jason Nark and Daily News Staff Writer
IT TOOK A POLICE battering ram to bust down the door of the West Philadelphia apartment. Once inside, police discovered a colorful cache of psychedelic drugs — enough LSD to open thousands of "doors of perception" for six to eight hours at a time.   The Jan. 31 raid appeared to be a true flashback to a bygone era, with the federal Drug Enforcement Administration calling the 9,500 hits of LSD on tie-dyed images of Homer Simpson and Jerry Garcia an "anomaly" in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph Hassman, the Cherry Hill physician whose medical license was revoked after he tearfully pleaded guilty to the mercy killing last year of his terminally ill mother-in-law, has returned to work. At a sparsely attended and unpublicized hearing Oct. 14, the state Board of Medical Examiners unanimously reinstated Hassman's license after deciding that he had "demonstrated his rehabilitation," a board spokesman said yesterday. Hassman, a former member of the Cherry Hill Township Council, had admitted administering a lethal dose of drugs to his mother-in-law, Esther Davis, 80, as she lay in bed at the Linwood Convalescent Center in April 1986.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2014
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts , Philadelphia, has elected K evin Kleinschmidt , a private investor and partner at Gabriel Investments, and Jeffrey Cook, chief financial officer at Pepsi Cola and National Brand Beverages Ltd., to its board. Friends of the Japanese House and Garden , the nonprofit that administers Shofuso, a traditional Japanese house and nationally ranked garden in West Fairmount Park, has named the following board members: Nobuki Iijima , architectural project coordinator, capital projects division of the Department of Public Property, City of Philadelphia; Kaori Ikeuchi , digital fabrication technician, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania; Kazayuki Morihata , founder/owner, Morihata International Ltd Co.; Masashi Uemura , vice president, corporate planning at Subaru of America; William Whitaker , curator and collections manager of the architectural archives at the University of Pennsylvania, and John Young , president, Tikaro Inc. Stradley Ronon partner Andrew K. Stutzman has joined the Strafford Banking & Finance Advisory Board . Stutzman chairs the firm's mortgage and lending litigation practice group.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Catholic church condemned forms of reproductive technology such as test-tube fertilization and surrogate motherhood last week, it spoke with a finality that some specialists in medical ethics described as undermining the discussion of complex issues. The Vatican position "stifles dialogue," said Joyce Bermel, managing editor of the Hastings Center Report, published by the Hastings Center in Briarcliff, N.Y., a research institution that focuses on ethical issues in biology and medicine.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware Valley College will host three live interactive teleconferences this year on nursing in the 1990s. The first conference is set for 1 to 3 p.m. Feb. 3. Registration deadline is Jan. 14. The conference will address the issues, dilemmas and applications of monitoring techniques for acute and critically ill patients. Medial and nursing experts will discuss types of monitoring and ethical considerations. The second conference runs from 12:30 to 3 p.m. March 24. The panel will address medical ethics and health-care policy and will include a clinician, medical ethicist, theologian, lawyer and public policy expert.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The United States Senate, the most exclusive and august deliberative body in the land, squiggled the other day. Every year the good senators fill tens of thousands of pages with their thoughts, their musings and, most important, their actions. Those pages fill the voluminous Congressional Record, but today those pages are blank on one key point in a critical and controversial action taken Wednesday afternoon. The issue was abortion, and the Senate approved a bill that would allow family planning clinics to tell people that abortion is a legal option, even if those clinics receive federal financing.
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