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Medical Ethics

NEWS
April 18, 2003 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The case of Marshall Klavan has been characterized as a complaint of "wrongful life" and a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury yesterday heard why at the opening of an unusual civil trial. Klavan, 71, a former obstetrician and gynecologist at Crozer-Chester Medical Center, has been in a nursing home for six years, incapacitated by a stroke. Fearing a stroke, Klavan had written an "advanced medical directive," or living will, in 1993 prohibiting extreme medical measures if he were to develop an "incurable or . . . irreversible mental or physical condition.
NEWS
April 10, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bruce Diamond, a Georgia pharmacologist, went from a lavish lifestyle as a respected drug researcher to strip searches, lousy food, sleep deprivation, and menial work as an imprisoned felon. Yesterday, he shared with colleagues the big reason they should not violate medical ethics and laws. "To prevent what happened to me from happening to you," the scientist told the annual meeting of the Association of Clinical Research Professionals, at the Convention Center. The association, with 17,000 members worldwide, aims to promote ethical practices in the testing of experimental drugs and treatments on humans.
NEWS
November 7, 2002
I believe that a great disservice has been done to both our citizens and our officers as a result of the events reported in The Inquirer on Oct. 24 and 25. ("Report blasts city drug unit supervision," Oct. 24; "Ortiz calls for City Council hearings on narcotics unit," Oct. 25.) We at Philadelphia Lodge #5, Fraternal Order of Police, are responsible for ensuring that the rights of our police officers and deputy sheriffs are protected. We do not and will not condone corrupt actions by any member of our bargaining unit.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania is taking another crack at one of medicine's thorniest issues: how to treat people who have no hope of recovery. The hospital's ethics committee has approved unusual new guidelines that include limits on high-tech treatment for patients with severe brain damage. Under the guidelines, intensive care would not routinely be given to patients in a persistent vegetative or minimally conscious state. Only patients who had explicitly requested such care would get it. The guidelines, which will not be implemented for at least a year, also say what the hospital will do for patients, both when there is hope for recovery and, later, when the goal shifts to providing good "hygiene, preservation of dignity, and alleviation of discomfort or suffering.
LIVING
January 9, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget dogs. Pigs are man's best friend. That is, as a future source of organs for transplantation into humans. "A pig is almost a human being prone, because the size is about right," Arthur L. Caplan, editor of The Ethics of Organ Transplants: The Current Debate (Prometheus Books, $17.95), said in a recent interview. And as to whether animals should be sacrificed to save the lives of humans, Caplan, who is trustee professor and director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, is unequivocal.
NEWS
December 24, 1998 | By Elsa C. Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Doctors caring for the newborn octuplets in Houston estimate that before the babies go home, they are likely to require at least $2 million of care, or about $250,000 per infant. No one likes to count pennies when it comes to health care, especially for fragile, premature babies such as the eight born to Nkem Chukwu. But in cases of the growing number of multiple births induced by excessive fertility treatments, medical and ethical experts say the enormous expense is entirely avoidable and even irresponsible.
LIVING
June 9, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The doctor thought his 35-year-old patient seemed to be coping as well as possible with terminal lung cancer, except for his insomnia. But as soon as the doctor agreed to write a prescription for sleeping pills, the patient asked for an outlandishly powerful dosage. "I might as well tell you, doctor, I want the pills so I can choose when to die," the man said last week. "I appreciate you confiding in me," responded the shaken doctor, "but I can't condone that. From my standpoint, I can't give you medications that will end your life.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. Francis J. Leonard, 60, pastor of Holy Maternity Roman Catholic Church in Audubon, died yesterday at St. Mary's Nursing Home, Cherry Hill. Born and raised in Camden, he was a graduate of Camden Catholic High School where he excelled in debating. He then attended St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia, Jordan Seminary in Menominee, Mich., St. Mary Seminary in Baltimore, and the University of Louvain in Belgium, where he earned his master's degree. He was ordained in 1963 at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Camden.
LIVING
September 30, 1996 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They injected chemicals into the eyes of children, hoping to find ways to turn brown eyes blue. They sought new sterilization methods by subjecting men's genitals to high doses of radiation. They extracted organs from living women for study under the microscope. Although most Americans associate these sorts of medical atrocities with the infamous Joseph Mengele, scores if not hundreds of other physicians and researchers flocked to serve the Nazis' perverted scientific beliefs. Many were tried and ultimately punished.
NEWS
May 15, 1996
It's ba-a-a-ck: Gov. Ridge's ill-advised plan to balance the commonwealth's budget by cutting medical care for 259,000 citizens. So Republicans in the Legislature have another appointment with destiny today. They are the only force that can preserve a few shreds of the vital safety net for poor people in this state when they vote again on that plan. In March, 24 House Republicans defied predictions that they would value party loyalty and ideology over common sense and compassion.
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