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Medical History

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NEWS
May 6, 2012 | By Alex Dominguez, Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the former Soviet Union leader, a UCLA neurologist said Friday. Dr. Harry Vinters and Russian historian Lev Lurie reviewed Lenin's records Friday for an annual University of Maryland School of Medicine conference that examines the death of famous figures. The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have reexamined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar, and Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Despite her infirmities, Raymond Smith's 83-year-old mother lives alone in her Ardmore, Montgomery County, home by choice. Smith, her only son, and his wife are the only points of contact for her medical history and prescriptions. Four years ago, Smith, 54, of Wynnewood, had to rush his mother to a local emergency room, only to find he could not remember all of her medications, which total about 12. The incident shook him, and he decided there had to be a better way to relay information to doctors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | By Charlene Mires, Inquirer Staff Writer
The operating table is hard and the light is dim, and a couple hundred people are waiting for the show to begin. You're lying there and the surgeon asks: What will you have to dull the pain? Rum? This opium preparation? Or just a mallet tap to the head? Oh, the pain. You must imagine these details of early surgery as you look about the circular surgical amphitheater at Pennsylvania Hospital - the oldest in North America. It is quiet today, a shrine to developing surgical skills and unspeakable pain.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until the 20th century, medicine was part pain relief and part fumbling experimentation, neither of which did much to cure the patient. A case in point was the trephine, a device used until the 19th century to vanquish migraine headaches. The trephine resembled a carpenter's bit and worked its magic by drilling into the skull to alleviate pressure. That was the theory, anyway, said pharmacist Alan Vogenberg, whose little black bag is actually a weathered, Civil War-era satchel containing a host of obsolete medicines, medical texts and tools.
NEWS
July 24, 2006 | By Erika Engelhaupt FOR THE INQUIRER
Lewis Ballew has diabetes and is waiting for a heart transplant. He tried keeping track of his complicated 10-year medical history on computer spreadsheets and lists, but he never had all his health information in one place. Neither did his doctors - cardiology test results, glucose levels and prescriptions could be spread across several floors of the hospital - until now. Ballew now uses Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's computer software to put all his health data on his home computer.
NEWS
June 30, 2006 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Legieko, a beloved ambulance driver and volunteer firefighter who often donned a Sparky the Fire Dog costume for schoolchildren, lived to help others, his parents and colleagues said. His sudden death at age 19 almost four years ago continued that legacy when three people received his organ donations. Yesterday, on the ninth day of a medical malpractice trial, Chester County Court Judge William P. Mahon dismissed the jury that had been listening to complex, often contradictory testimony about Legieko's final hours at Brandywine Hospital on Sept.
LIVING
January 10, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The books are hardly household names. But for buffs of medical history, the stacks at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia top any best-seller list. Hundreds of scholars from around the world come each year to peer into the collection, which contains such works as William Harvey's 1628 book on blood circulation, De motu cordis, and a 1738 health advisory printed by Benjamin Franklin warning about the toxic levels of lead in Jamaican rum. The College of Physicians, the nation's oldest medical society, is counting on this past to ensure a vital future.
SPORTS
March 6, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
After leading the nation in scoring and rebounding last season as a junior, Loyola Marymount's Hank Gathers considered skipping his senior season and entering the NBA draft. Had Gathers done so, he would have undergone the extensive predraft medical examinations performed on all top NBA prospects. But, an NBA team physician said yesterday, it's doubtful the tests would have revealed the heart defect that led to the 23-year-old Gathers's death Sunday night. Los Angeles Clippers physician Dr. Tony Daly said all NBA prospects are given a complete physical before the draft.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Pam Belluck and Kevin McKinney, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The man who killed himself by lying in the path of a speeding SEPTA train in Chester County Tuesday night was a Veterans Administration Medical Center psychiatric patient on a restricted one-hour pass issued more than six hours prior to the incident, according to a VA source. The source, who asked to not be identified and who is familiar with the medical history of the dead man, identified as John Thomas Marzak Jr., 32, said Marzak had attempted suicide before. Marzak, who entered the hospital in Coatesville in 1989, was known to be despondent over a troubled romance with a fellow patient, according to the source.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
A Phoenixville woman is suing a Philadelphia couple for invasion of privacy and breach of a confidential relationship, saying they used her medical records to design an advertising campaign to promote their exodermology center. Kathleen T. Golden is suing Kakkadasam R. Sampathachar and his wife, R. Pannathpur Jayalaksmi, owners of the New Life Exodermology Center, seeking more than $20,000 in damages. The suit also names American Advertising Co. in Philadelphia and Phoenixville Newspapers Inc. as defendants.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By John J. McKeown Jr
I was first introduced to Dr. John Heysham Gibbon in 1948, when I became a resident at Thomas Jefferson Medical College Hospital. As my principal teacher in surgery, he was a great influence. Gibbon was a pioneer investigator in the heart-lung machine. I first heard of the machine in 1946, when Gibbon came back to Jefferson. By that time, he had been working on the idea for 16 years. He first thought of the idea in 1930, while working in Massachusetts with Dr. Edward Churchill, the famous Boston surgeon.
SPORTS
June 3, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies didn't have any further information on Roy Halladay's shoulder, but his successor in the rotation appears to be determined. After throwing a second bullpen session this week, injured righthander Vance Worley could move into Halladay's slot in the rotation on Monday when the Los Angeles Dodgers begin the first of a four-game series at Citizens Bank Park. Much will depend on how Worley feels over the weekend after throwing his bullpen session before Friday's game against the visiting Miami Marlins.
NEWS
May 6, 2012 | By Alex Dominguez, Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the former Soviet Union leader, a UCLA neurologist said Friday. Dr. Harry Vinters and Russian historian Lev Lurie reviewed Lenin's records Friday for an annual University of Maryland School of Medicine conference that examines the death of famous figures. The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have reexamined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar, and Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathryn Segesser says she believes the current thinking about eating disorders may be wrong. Segesser suspects that for centuries, anorexia and bulimia have afflicted both men and women. She would like to challenge the popular theory that blames modern cultural pressures and unrealistic images of beauty projected by lollipop-thin models. "I'm trying to see if, in the 18th century, people understood that there was some psychological reason that people decided not to eat," Segesser said.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The woman found floating Wednesday in the Schuylkill was identified today as a 72-year-old from Conshohocken. Catherine Kelly, of Spring Mill Avenue, died of drowning, Montgomery County coroner Walter I. Hofman said this afternoon. But investigators still cannot figure out how she got into the river. Her home is a half-mile away. Hofman said the determination of drowning was provisional; it might be unchanged later if investigators find that there was foul play. So far, there is no reason to think that, detectives said Wednesday.
NEWS
October 18, 2008 | By Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cassandra "Sandy" Morgan, who was arrested for stealing from a Wal-Mart that she believed she owned, should have been taken to a hospital, not a jail, a psychiatrist testified in federal court yesterday. Morgan, 38, of Aston, suffered from schizophrenia, and her condition had grown worse when the police caught her trying to take toys in February 2006. "I think she was a medical psychiatric emergency from the minute she was taken into that prison," said Eric Fine, a clinical psychiatrist and associate professor at Jefferson Medical College.
SPORTS
February 21, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Former WBO heavyweight champion Tommy Morrison is staging a comeback, saying yesterday that a positive HIV test that ended his career more than a decade ago was inaccurate. "I'm negative and I've always been negative and that should be the end of it," Morrison said in a telephone interview with the Associated Press. The 38-year-old will face John Castle in a four-round fight tomorrow at Mountaineer Racetrack and Gaming Resort in Chester, W.Va. "The rug was yanked out from under my feet by a misdiagnosis," he said.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While some describe electronic medical records as a superhighway to better care and increased efficiency in the medical system, others worry that it could be a dangerous dark alley. "The electronic health system is not safe," said Deborah C. Peel, an Austin, Texas, psychiatrist who founded the Patient Privacy Rights Foundation. Just ask David Richardson. An acquaintance of Richardson's used the Philadelphia man's name and health insurance information to obtain medical services at several hospitals, including Hahnemann University Hospital and Chester County Hospital, according to the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
December 1, 2006 | By David S. Traub
The terrible prospect of Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic leaving the city has reignited an idea that has been smoldering in my mind for some time. To combat Philadelphia's continuing job-loss problem, we need to identify sectors of the economy that are still viable and build upon them. One way of building is to first "dramatize. " Our medical and health-sciences industry is one of the largest on the planet. We have six medical schools, two dental schools, innumerable great hospitals and nursing schools, a host of pharmaceutical and bioresearch companies, health-care insurers, and thousands of medical doctors in private practice.
NEWS
July 24, 2006 | By Erika Engelhaupt FOR THE INQUIRER
Lewis Ballew has diabetes and is waiting for a heart transplant. He tried keeping track of his complicated 10-year medical history on computer spreadsheets and lists, but he never had all his health information in one place. Neither did his doctors - cardiology test results, glucose levels and prescriptions could be spread across several floors of the hospital - until now. Ballew now uses Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's computer software to put all his health data on his home computer.
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