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Medical Practice

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NEWS
January 31, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
HOBBLED BY prostate cancer, a blood disorder and a partly amputated right foot, Dr. Richard Minicozzi, 79, defended himself in a booming voice Tuesday in a federal courtroom, where he was sentenced to seven years in prison for turning his South Philadelphia medical practice into what prosecutors called a lucrative "pill mill. " In selling prescription drugs to his low-income patients, he was trying to help them, said Minicozzi, adding: "I felt sorry for them. Now I'm in trouble. I'm begging at the mercy of the court.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
Nicholas DeMaria, Sicklerville's doctor, knows better than just about anyone how quickly the community has grown in the last decade. You see, most of the residents are his patients. "We're at 7,000 and counting," DeMaria said. He opened the practice only four years ago and already bulging files line the reception room of his offices on Williamstown-New Freedom Road in Winslow Township. DeMaria came to Sicklerville, once a quiet farming community, in 1986 after finishing his residency at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden.
NEWS
July 26, 2004 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk to the doctor with the thick Brooklyn accent about how best to treat patients, and Scott S. Levy shares his "Nordstrom" approach to medical care. "My concept is, you run a medical practice like Nordstrom. You provide patient service, you try to do what's good for patients," said the new vice president and chief medical officer of Doylestown Hospital. "And if you do that, my feeling is, in the long run it will pay off. You treat patients like they're a customer. " Levy, who specializes in kidneys and hypertension, believes Doylestown Hospital, which is expanding with booming Bucks County, is thriving with that approach to patients.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2012 | Diane Mastrull
Bonnie Offit's medical schooling didn't deal much with the condition known as midlife crisis. After all, she was studying to be a pediatrician; her patients would be a long way from tiring of life's routine. But Offit knows it when she's experiencing it. "This is my midlife crisis, for sure," the 50-year-old Bala Cynwyd mother of two said, laughing, one recent morning as she sat in the frozen-yogurt shop she opened just before Memorial Day weekend in Stone Harbor. It's one of three Bonnie's Toppings stores she has opened in the last year at the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The affair was in 1993 and lasted three months. But one suburban doctor says the dalliance with "Black Madam" Padge Victoria Windslowe cost decades of personal anguish, demands for money, and involvement in a criminal probe of her silicone buttocks-enhancement business. James Taterka, a Montgomery County gastroenterologist, told a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury Tuesday that he was ashamed of cheating on his wife and humiliated that he and his medical practice had been dragged into Windslowe's murder trial.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Eugene V. Donohoe did not just provide medical treatment to pregnant women as an obstetrician-gynecologist in Haddon Heights. On four occasions from the early 1960s to the mid-1970s, "my parents had a woman who lived with us," who was pregnant and single, a daughter, Martha, said in a phone interview. "He's Catholic and does not believe in abortion," she said. On Monday, June 9, Dr. Donohoe, 82, died of leukemia at home. In opening his home, his daughter said, "he wanted to ensure that if somebody was in need, that they would not see their social situation as an obstacle.
NEWS
September 17, 2008 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Northeast Philadelphia doctor was sentenced yesterday to a year and a day in federal prison for operating what prosecutors described as a "pill mill" that distributed thousands of diet pills. Albert Kofsky, 76, of Huntingdon Valley, also was ordered to pay a $200,000 fine, refrain from the practice of medicine, and forfeit to the government more than $1.7 million in assets. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Derek A. Cohen and Thomas M. Zaleski had sought a two-year prison sentence, saying Kofsky made millions from the sales of the diet pills and even had $1 million hidden in his basement.
NEWS
October 8, 1986
I urge Gov. Thornburgh to veto the underage-drinking bill because of the improper amendment, by which Sen. Joe Rocks (D., Phila.) is attempting to misuse the "certificate-of-need" process in order to deny women their legal right to abortion by crippling clinics. This would be an abuse of the concept of certificate-of-need, which has been used for the last 10 years by health systems agencies. The procedure is an intricate system of checks and balances that has as its purpose the prevention of too large and duplicative hospital buildings, equipment and services in order to reduce health care costs.
NEWS
December 9, 1986 | By Phyllis Holtzman, Special to The Inquirer
A 72-year-old Upper Darby physician who pleaded guilty to illegally prescribing drugs to 14 people was sentenced yesterday in Delaware County Court to 15 years of probation. Edward Freedman, who had agreed in a plea bargain in July to give up his medical practice, was also ordered by Judge Clement J. McGovern Jr. to perform 1,000 hours of community service. McGovern suggested that Freedman perform the community service at a drug treatment center. Freedman, who had practiced from his home in the 300 block of Long Lane for 40 years, could have been sentenced to 15 years in prison and fined $250,000 if he had been convicted of felony drug violations.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William P. Rumsey, 93, of Wallingford, chief of surgery at Sacred Heart Hospital in Chester in the 1970s, died Friday, July 9, at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Born in Swarthmore, Dr. Rumsey graduated from Swarthmore High School in 1935, earned a premed bachelor's degree at Pennsylvania State University in 1939, and graduated from Temple University School of Medicine in 1943. A daughter, Joanne Jenkins, said that for much of the remainder of World War II, Dr. Rumsey was an Army surgeon at a military hospital outside London.
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NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The affair was in 1993 and lasted three months. But one suburban doctor says the dalliance with "Black Madam" Padge Victoria Windslowe cost decades of personal anguish, demands for money, and involvement in a criminal probe of her silicone buttocks-enhancement business. James Taterka, a Montgomery County gastroenterologist, told a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury Tuesday that he was ashamed of cheating on his wife and humiliated that he and his medical practice had been dragged into Windslowe's murder trial.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bioterrorist attack has exposed a swath of Philadelphia to anthrax and thousands of residents need antibiotics to try to ward off the deadly bacterial infection. That scenario was part of Saturday's training session for nearly 200 new volunteers with the Philadelphia Medical Reserve Corps. "Imagine 20,000 Philadelphians coming through here, getting medications" for anthrax, said physician Steve Alles, standing in the gymnasium of the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where the training exercise was held.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Eugene V. Donohoe did not just provide medical treatment to pregnant women as an obstetrician-gynecologist in Haddon Heights. On four occasions from the early 1960s to the mid-1970s, "my parents had a woman who lived with us," who was pregnant and single, a daughter, Martha, said in a phone interview. "He's Catholic and does not believe in abortion," she said. On Monday, June 9, Dr. Donohoe, 82, died of leukemia at home. In opening his home, his daughter said, "he wanted to ensure that if somebody was in need, that they would not see their social situation as an obstacle.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter vetoed a bill Thursday that critics said would make it harder for medical and dental practices to locate in two Northeast Philadelphia Council districts. City Council quickly overturned the veto by a 16-1 margin, but Councilman Mark Squilla introduced a virtually identical bill to apply the same restrictions in his district. Squilla predicted that many of his colleagues would follow suit in the coming weeks. The original bill, sponsored by Council members Brian J. O'Neill and Bobby Henon and passed unanimously last month, requires new medical practices to seek a zoning variance and community input before locating in their Northeast districts.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard A. Krull, 97, of Haddon Township, a former internal medicine physician in Teaneck, N.J., who earned a Bronze Star in World War II, died Monday, Sept. 9, at Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice in Mount Holly. He had lived in Haddon Township since 2006. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he graduated from Abraham Lincoln High School in January 1933, and earned a bachelor's degree at New York University in 1936, a master's at the University of Cincinnati in 1937, and his medical degree there in 1941.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karen Feisullin stood in the courtroom and looked at the yellowing ultrasound machine removed from the West Philadelphia abortion clinic of Kermit Gosnell. "I've never seen anything this old, this is an old machine," Feisullin, an obstetrician-gynecologist and a doctor for 11 years, told Assistant District Attorney Edward Cameron. Feisullin was called as a witness for the prosecution as the third week of the murder trial of Gosnell began Tuesday in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles A. Ritchie, 87, of Drexel Hill, an obstetrician who delivered hundreds of babies and enjoyed being reminded of that when they grew up, died Saturday, March 9, of an infection at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Ritchie was well-known in Philadelphia and Delaware County for his longtime practice of obstetrics and gynecology. In 2002, he was honored for 50 years of distinguished service by the Pennsylvania Medical Society and Delaware County Medical Society. He had staff privileges at St. Vincent's Hospital in Southwest Philadelphia, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby Borough, and Delaware County Memorial Hospital in Drexel Hill.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
John C. Esposito, 86, a physician in Springfield, Delaware County, for more than 50 years, died Monday, Feb. 18, of cancer at his winter home in Cape Coral, Fla. A son of Italian immigrants, Dr. Esposito grew up in South Philadelphia. His parents, Charles and Anna, impressed on him the importance of a sound education. After graduating from South Philadelphia High School for Boys and Temple University, he received his medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
HOBBLED BY prostate cancer, a blood disorder and a partly amputated right foot, Dr. Richard Minicozzi, 79, defended himself in a booming voice Tuesday in a federal courtroom, where he was sentenced to seven years in prison for turning his South Philadelphia medical practice into what prosecutors called a lucrative "pill mill. " In selling prescription drugs to his low-income patients, he was trying to help them, said Minicozzi, adding: "I felt sorry for them. Now I'm in trouble. I'm begging at the mercy of the court.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 28 years in office, Letitia "Tish" Colombi, the only woman ever elected to the Haddonfield Board of Commissioners and the only female mayor in the borough's history, has decided not to run again. Her term expires in May. Colombi was first elected a commissioner in 1985 and became mayor in 2001. She has been reelected twice since. She will turn 68 next month, and would have been 72 by the end of her next term had she been elected once more. "At 72, am I going to have the same energy I do now?
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