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Medical Records

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NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Richard Lavinthal
About 20 percent of America is suffering from a poor "credit health history" due to widespread inaccuracies in their data reported by at least one of the big three reporting agencies, the Federal Trade Commission announced recently. Some inaccuracies have caused unjustified higher fees for borrowing. But at least Americans can easily spot problems in their financial reports. They may be difficult or impossible to fix, but those records have to be provided to consumers. There are far more important records that may contain dangerous, inaccurate data, but aren't available anywhere: our personal medical files.
SPORTS
July 10, 2015 | John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
YOU MIGHT THINK journalistic integrity would be a simple concept - something covered almost immediately in Journalism 101 and then beaten into every reporter's head forever after. To be honest, on some level that is exactly what happens. The problem is that "journalistic integrity," just like regular integrity, sometimes falls into those hazy shades of gray that do not present a universal definition. In almost every case, journalistic integrity comes down to a few opinions decided by an individual reporter and the directors of the news entity that person works for. Something viewed as pushing the envelope by one news organization could be no big deal by another, or way out of bounds by a third.
NEWS
September 6, 1996
Americans have the right to detailed information about the health of presidential candidates before they put one of them in the Oval Office. And they deserve updates after that. Bill Clinton shortchanged the public as a candidate four years ago, and he is doing it again now. He seems to think that his robust appearance, backed by sunny words and skimpy details from his spokesman, will suffice. It won't. The health of his 73-year-old opponent, Bob Dole, has been documented by medical records released last year, and further explained in an interview Mr. Dole's doctor gave to a medical reporter for The New York Times.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Electronic medical records are considered by many health-care experts an essential tool in eventually providing better and more cost-efficient health care for Americans, but the implementation process is still in its infancy and has teething pains, as explained in a government report released Thursday. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) have provided financial incentives for doctors and hospitals to implement effective electronic records. According to CMS records, 51 hospitals in Pennsylvania and 15 in New Jersey have received payments, as have 3,798 Pennsylvania doctors and 2,135 of their colleagues in New Jersey.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The HealthShare Exchange of Southeastern Pennsylvania, a nonprofit formed to facilitate the electronic sharing of medical records among hospitals, doctors and insurers, has established its first link, between the University of Pennsylvania Health System and Crozer-Keystone Health System. The development, announced last week by HealthShare officials, was a big step in the highly fragmented Philadelphia-area health-care market, because the exchange could eventually close expensive information gaps that lead to redundant testing and other waste.
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Patients can now create their own online medical records, receive electronic health alerts tailored to their ailments, and exchange e-mail with their doctors free of charge, under a service unveiled yesterday. The for-profit venture, called iHealthRecord, is part of an ongoing trend toward converting patient records, many of which still are maintained on paper, to the Internet. Health-care economists say conversion of patient records to databases linked to the Internet would save billions of dollars and greatly improve patient care by, among other things, helping to avoid medical errors.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Picture this: A man is found unconscious and rushed to the emergency room. Doctors fish in his wallet and find his Social Security number. They punch the number into a huge computer network with access to the medical records of every American. Within seconds, the doctors know all about the man - every allergy, diagnosis and treatment he's ever had. Now picture this: Potential employers, insurance companies or political adversaries punch that same Social Security number, tap into that same network - and find out about the man's drinking habits, his vasectomy and his psychoanalysis.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cerner Corp., of North Kansas City, Mo., said Monday that it completed its $1.3 billion purchase of Malvern's Siemens Health Services, joining two rivals in the rapidly changing field of health-information technology. Cerner offered jobs to all but a few of the roughly 2,800 Siemens employees in Malvern, with 95 percent to 97 percent of them accepting the offers, said Dick Flanigan, a senior vice president at Cerner. "We wanted to maintain and build upon much of the work that's been done by the Malvern team," Flanigan said, adding that the deal included Siemens' corporate campus.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paulsboro Mayor Jeffery Hamilton was on several medications for bronchitis and hypertension, and had had a beer and a shot on the night he was arrested in Woolwich Township for drunken driving, his attorney said Wednesday. Charles Block told a judge he wanted an expert to review Hamilton's medical records to determine whether the mix of alcohol and medications influenced Hamilton's actions and made him appear intoxicated. Municipal Court Judge Jason D. Witcher in Carneys Point, where the case was moved to avoid a potential conflict, granted the request.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: Can you comment on a report that chronic Ambien users are three times more likely to die of a heart attack? Answer: That's not exactly what the online-only British Medical Journal study reported. It reported that researchers compared the medical records of 10,529 people who received Ambien, Restoril, Lunesta, a sedating antihistamine like Benadryl, or some other sedative like Xanax for sleep with 23,676 who did not receive any sleeping pill over an average period of 21/2 years.
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SPORTS
July 10, 2015 | John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
YOU MIGHT THINK journalistic integrity would be a simple concept - something covered almost immediately in Journalism 101 and then beaten into every reporter's head forever after. To be honest, on some level that is exactly what happens. The problem is that "journalistic integrity," just like regular integrity, sometimes falls into those hazy shades of gray that do not present a universal definition. In almost every case, journalistic integrity comes down to a few opinions decided by an individual reporter and the directors of the news entity that person works for. Something viewed as pushing the envelope by one news organization could be no big deal by another, or way out of bounds by a third.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the last 91/2 years, Jose Alicea sat in prison awaiting trial while his lawyer pursued the theory that Alicea's intellectual and emotional problems made him prone to falsely confessing to a 2005 murder in an Olney restaurant. On Friday, a Philadelphia judge sentenced Alicea, who has professed a prison conversion to Christianity and in December pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the death of George Esroy Rowe, to 17 to 35 years in prison. Alicea, now 28, apologized for killing Rowe to the 21-year-old victim's family, to his own mother and family, and to his wife and a daughter who has grown up without him. "I'm deeply sorry for firing the gun that took George Rowe's life," Alicea said.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
POTTSVILLE, Pa. - Convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is in intensive care for treatment of diabetes and is "not doing well," his family said Tuesday. Abu-Jamal, 60, was taken from the state Correctional Institution-Mahanoy to Schuylkill Medical Center in Pottsville on Monday after passing out, his wife, Wadiya Jamal, said outside the hospital. His blood sugar level was very high, 779, when he arrived at the hospital and remains above 300, she said. Anything above 186 is considered dangerously high.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paulsboro Mayor Jeffery Hamilton was on several medications for bronchitis and hypertension, and had had a beer and a shot on the night he was arrested in Woolwich Township for drunken driving, his attorney said Wednesday. Charles Block told a judge he wanted an expert to review Hamilton's medical records to determine whether the mix of alcohol and medications influenced Hamilton's actions and made him appear intoxicated. Municipal Court Judge Jason D. Witcher in Carneys Point, where the case was moved to avoid a potential conflict, granted the request.
SPORTS
February 18, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The proposed deal between the NFL and its retired players addressing long-term effects of repeated concussions is inching closer to final approval, as lawyers amended their settlement proposal to include five changes requested by a federal judge. The revisions would require the league to remove a $75 million cap to pay for baseline neurological testing for all eligible retirees, extend the cutoff date for the families of deceased players to obtain diagnoses for certain conditions, and grant some credit to players who spent time in development leagues like NFL Europe.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cerner Corp., of North Kansas City, Mo., said Monday that it completed its $1.3 billion purchase of Malvern's Siemens Health Services, joining two rivals in the rapidly changing field of health-information technology. Cerner offered jobs to all but a few of the roughly 2,800 Siemens employees in Malvern, with 95 percent to 97 percent of them accepting the offers, said Dick Flanigan, a senior vice president at Cerner. "We wanted to maintain and build upon much of the work that's been done by the Malvern team," Flanigan said, adding that the deal included Siemens' corporate campus.
SPORTS
June 14, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers worked out Julius Randle, who could slide to them in the NBA draft, according to reports. The former Kentucky power forward reportedly had a private workout Wednesday morning at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. The workout occurred before the Sixers put Michigan State's Gary Harris, North Carolina's P.J. Hairston, and other guard prospects through drills. Libertyballers.com first reported the news. Randle, who left Kentucky after his freshman season, is scheduled to work out for the Boston Celtics on Friday.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCILMAN Mark Squilla was met with zero opposition yesterday to a bill targeting so-called pill mills, medical practices in which doctors write prescriptions for highly addictive medications that are often resold on the street. The bill would impose penalties and stop-work orders on such "nuisance health establishments. " Council's Public Health and Human Services Committee passed it unanimously. "These pill mills - we had lines of people waiting outside," Squilla said.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The HealthShare Exchange of Southeastern Pennsylvania, a nonprofit formed to facilitate the electronic sharing of medical records among hospitals, doctors and insurers, has established its first link, between the University of Pennsylvania Health System and Crozer-Keystone Health System. The development, announced last week by HealthShare officials, was a big step in the highly fragmented Philadelphia-area health-care market, because the exchange could eventually close expensive information gaps that lead to redundant testing and other waste.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Thursday that he had asked prosecutors to launch a grand jury investigation into a teen's claim that he was seriously injured when a police officer grabbed his genitals during an arrest in North Philadelphia last month. Ramsey said he asked the District Attorney's Office to look into the matter after the department reviewed the teen's medical records and noticed inconsistencies between them and his account of his injuries. Darrin Manning, 16, was arrested near the Girard Avenue subway station Jan. 7 after police spotted him and several friends running from it. Video showed what police called a brief struggle between Manning and officers.
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