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Medical Records

BUSINESS
July 22, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you haven't been in a hospital for a few years, you might be surprised at how technology aimed at making your stay safer and more enjoyable is emerging in this notoriously paperbound industry. Your doctor may wheel a computer into your room during an exam. Your nurse may scan the bar code on your ID bracelet before giving you a pill. If you face a long wait for a procedure, a hospital employee may give you a pager much like the ones those perpetually busy chain restaurants hand out. Your preemie may send you an e-mail.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Hospitals have a legal obligation to allow former patients free access to X-rays and other medical records, a city judge has ruled. "Hospitals cannot impose roadblocks to frustrate the patient's right to see his or her own records," Common Pleas Judge Richard B. Klein said in a formal opinion. "The hospital may not hold the films hostage to interfere with the patient's right to use the X-rays of his or her body for further diagnoses and treatment or for purposes of litigation.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware County District Attorney's office says it is investigating whether bullying led to a Jan. 10 schoolyard fight at Darby Township Elementary School in which an 11-year-old reportedly was seriously injured. "There is no confimation that this altercation was a result of bullying," DA spokeswoman Emily Harris said in an interview Friday. The 11-year-old victim, Baily O'Neill, a sixth-grader at the school, has since been hospitalized. The Darby Township Police Department is leading the investigation, which the DA's office is assisting, Harris said.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RUSHVILLE, Ill. - Patients line up early outside his office just off the town square, waiting quietly for the doctor to arrive, as he has done for nearly 60 years. Dr. Russell Dohner is, after all, a man of routine, a steady force to be counted on in uncertain times. His office has no fax machines or computers. Medical records are kept on handwritten index cards, stuffed into row upon row of filing cabinets. The only thing that has changed really - other than the quickness of the doctor's step or the color of his thinning hair - is his fee. When Dohner started practicing medicine in Rushville in 1955, he charged the going rate around town for an office visit: $2. Now, it is $5. This in an era when the cost of health care has steadily risen, when those who don't have medical insurance often forgo seeing a doctor.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | Associated Press
MANHEIM, Pa. - A central Pennsylvania man suffocated his 17-year-old girlfriend by sitting on her head after he intentionally drove into a guardrail at about 100 m.p.h. in the middle of the night, authorities said. Police filed homicide and other charges Friday against Benjamin Daniel Klinger, 19, for the Dec. 4 death of Sammi Heller on an interstate near Manheim. Klinger is accused of crashing on purpose, then killing Heller by sitting on her until she was asphyxiated. "At first glance, this appeared to be simply another tragic vehicle accident," Lancaster County District Attorney Craig Stedman told the Lancaster Intelligencer Journal-New Era. "However, the police worked hand in hand with our forensic experts and saw this was far more complicated, sinister, and certainly criminal.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Daniel Estrin, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A former Israeli official on Wednesday denied suspicions that Israel poisoned Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, as France prepared to begin an investigation into his possible murder following a Swiss lab's claim that it found traces of a deadly substance on his belongings. Dov Weisglass, chief of staff to then-Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon at the time of Arafat's death in 2004 and a key participant in deliberations surrounding Arafat's worsening health, said Israel had no reason to physically harm the Palestinian leader.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bridgeport couple were charged Wednesday with endangering the welfare of a child after they let their 6-year-old son almost starve to death, police said. Police arrested Victor and Olaifa O. Abramson Ramos of East Fourth Street and charged them with reckless endangerment, assault, and criminal conspiracy. The parents were released on $50,000 bail after a hearing before District Judge James Gallagher. They can have no contact with their son, who is being cared for by other family members with supervision from Montgomery County caseworkers, said Assistant District Attorney Samantha Cauffman.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Raquel Dillon and Greg Risling, Associated Press
SAN GABRIEL, Calif. - Medical records could determine whether U.S. Commerce Secretary John Bryson will be charged in two weekend fender-benders that led to his hospitalization after police found him slumped behind the wheel of his vehicle in the Los Angeles suburbs. Bryson suffered a seizure Saturday afternoon, Commerce Department officials said Monday, but it wasn't clear whether the medical episode preceded or followed a hit-and-run collision. Bryson, 68, was driving alone in a Lexus in San Gabriel, a community of about 40,000 northeast of Los Angeles, when he struck the rear of a vehicle that had stopped for a passing train, authorities said.
SPORTS
June 14, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers worked out Julius Randle, who could slide to them in the NBA draft, according to reports. The former Kentucky power forward reportedly had a private workout Wednesday morning at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. The workout occurred before the Sixers put Michigan State's Gary Harris, North Carolina's P.J. Hairston, and other guard prospects through drills. Libertyballers.com first reported the news. Randle, who left Kentucky after his freshman season, is scheduled to work out for the Boston Celtics on Friday.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury is to resume its apparently methodical analysis of the case against abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell on Friday after learning that the task ahead may be bigger than it thought. Among the long list of charges against Gosnell, 72, are 227 counts of violating the state's 24-hour waiting period before a woman can have an abortion. Late Thursday, the Common Pleas Court jury of seven women and five men asked if an earlier stipulation involving medical records for those abortions meant it could return one mass verdict.
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