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Medical Records

NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware County District Attorney's office says it is investigating whether bullying led to a Jan. 10 schoolyard fight at Darby Township Elementary School in which an 11-year-old reportedly was seriously injured. "There is no confimation that this altercation was a result of bullying," DA spokeswoman Emily Harris said in an interview Friday. The 11-year-old victim, Baily O'Neill, a sixth-grader at the school, has since been hospitalized. The Darby Township Police Department is leading the investigation, which the DA's office is assisting, Harris said.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RUSHVILLE, Ill. - Patients line up early outside his office just off the town square, waiting quietly for the doctor to arrive, as he has done for nearly 60 years. Dr. Russell Dohner is, after all, a man of routine, a steady force to be counted on in uncertain times. His office has no fax machines or computers. Medical records are kept on handwritten index cards, stuffed into row upon row of filing cabinets. The only thing that has changed really - other than the quickness of the doctor's step or the color of his thinning hair - is his fee. When Dohner started practicing medicine in Rushville in 1955, he charged the going rate around town for an office visit: $2. Now, it is $5. This in an era when the cost of health care has steadily risen, when those who don't have medical insurance often forgo seeing a doctor.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | Associated Press
MANHEIM, Pa. - A central Pennsylvania man suffocated his 17-year-old girlfriend by sitting on her head after he intentionally drove into a guardrail at about 100 m.p.h. in the middle of the night, authorities said. Police filed homicide and other charges Friday against Benjamin Daniel Klinger, 19, for the Dec. 4 death of Sammi Heller on an interstate near Manheim. Klinger is accused of crashing on purpose, then killing Heller by sitting on her until she was asphyxiated. "At first glance, this appeared to be simply another tragic vehicle accident," Lancaster County District Attorney Craig Stedman told the Lancaster Intelligencer Journal-New Era. "However, the police worked hand in hand with our forensic experts and saw this was far more complicated, sinister, and certainly criminal.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCILMAN Mark Squilla was met with zero opposition yesterday to a bill targeting so-called pill mills, medical practices in which doctors write prescriptions for highly addictive medications that are often resold on the street. The bill would impose penalties and stop-work orders on such "nuisance health establishments. " Council's Public Health and Human Services Committee passed it unanimously. "These pill mills - we had lines of people waiting outside," Squilla said.
NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman asked the county coroner to examine the body of Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua last week because the timing of the 88-year-old prelate's death struck her as "peculiar," she said Friday. Ferman acknowledged that she enlisted county Coroner Walter I. Hofman because the cardinal died one day after a Philadelphia judge said Bevilacqua could be called to testify at the child sex-abuse and endangerment trial of three current and former priests.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Daniel Estrin, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A former Israeli official on Wednesday denied suspicions that Israel poisoned Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, as France prepared to begin an investigation into his possible murder following a Swiss lab's claim that it found traces of a deadly substance on his belongings. Dov Weisglass, chief of staff to then-Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon at the time of Arafat's death in 2004 and a key participant in deliberations surrounding Arafat's worsening health, said Israel had no reason to physically harm the Palestinian leader.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bridgeport couple were charged Wednesday with endangering the welfare of a child after they let their 6-year-old son almost starve to death, police said. Police arrested Victor and Olaifa O. Abramson Ramos of East Fourth Street and charged them with reckless endangerment, assault, and criminal conspiracy. The parents were released on $50,000 bail after a hearing before District Judge James Gallagher. They can have no contact with their son, who is being cared for by other family members with supervision from Montgomery County caseworkers, said Assistant District Attorney Samantha Cauffman.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Raquel Dillon and Greg Risling, Associated Press
SAN GABRIEL, Calif. - Medical records could determine whether U.S. Commerce Secretary John Bryson will be charged in two weekend fender-benders that led to his hospitalization after police found him slumped behind the wheel of his vehicle in the Los Angeles suburbs. Bryson suffered a seizure Saturday afternoon, Commerce Department officials said Monday, but it wasn't clear whether the medical episode preceded or followed a hit-and-run collision. Bryson, 68, was driving alone in a Lexus in San Gabriel, a community of about 40,000 northeast of Los Angeles, when he struck the rear of a vehicle that had stopped for a passing train, authorities said.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury is to resume its apparently methodical analysis of the case against abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell on Friday after learning that the task ahead may be bigger than it thought. Among the long list of charges against Gosnell, 72, are 227 counts of violating the state's 24-hour waiting period before a woman can have an abortion. Late Thursday, the Common Pleas Court jury of seven women and five men asked if an earlier stipulation involving medical records for those abortions meant it could return one mass verdict.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathryn Segesser says she believes the current thinking about eating disorders may be wrong. Segesser suspects that for centuries, anorexia and bulimia have afflicted both men and women. She would like to challenge the popular theory that blames modern cultural pressures and unrealistic images of beauty projected by lollipop-thin models. "I'm trying to see if, in the 18th century, people understood that there was some psychological reason that people decided not to eat," Segesser said.
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