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Medical Records

NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman asked the county coroner to examine the body of Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua last week because the timing of the 88-year-old prelate's death struck her as "peculiar," she said Friday. Ferman acknowledged that she enlisted county Coroner Walter I. Hofman because the cardinal died one day after a Philadelphia judge said Bevilacqua could be called to testify at the child sex-abuse and endangerment trial of three current and former priests.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman asked the county coroner to examine the body of Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua last week because the timing of the 88-year-old prelate's death struck her as "peculiar," she said Friday. Ferman acknowledged that she enlisted county Coroner Walter I. Hofman because the cardinal died one day after a Philadelphia judge said Bevilacqua could be called to testify at the child sex-abuse and endangerment trial of three current and former priests.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
BRITNEY SPEARS ' surely fascinating medical history will continue to be private. L.A. Superior Court Judge Reva Goetz ruled yesterday that a company suing Britney won't receive the access it requested. That company makes perfume. Because of the conservatorship Britney has been under since 2008, she will not be required to give a deposition in the lawsuit from Brand Sense, which claims it helped negotiate a fragrance deal for Britney but then was cut out of the profits. There were profits?
BUSINESS
July 31, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The physician was full of bluster, threatening to sue the software vendor that had landed his practice in a quagmire as it tried to convert from paper medical files to an electronic database. "I'm feeling betrayed," he said last week, sitting in a crowded back office. Office manager Liz Wiener listened, letting the sound wash over her as she slumped over a conference table. Beth Schindele, Delaware's high-tech equivalent of the state agricultural extension agent, nodded her head in sympathy.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The rise in electronic medical records has given Brittany Fera, a premed student at Temple University, an "awesome" job that she had no idea existed before she saw an ad last year. It's not the geeky programming kind of job you might guess. The new record-keeping systems, which are touted as a way to improve efficiency and quality, slow down emergency medicine physicians so much that the doctors are hiring young people like Fera to input data for them. They call this growing group of employees "medical scribes.
NEWS
October 11, 2010 | By Christina Hernandez, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
In a move to improve medical care and cut unnecessary services, Camden's three health systems will begin to go live Monday with a citywide health record that should enable doctors to better know their patients' medical histories. The Camden Health Information Exchange is one of the most advanced of a small number of efforts nationally that seek to create broader medical-record systems, experts said. Unless patients opt out during any hospital visit, anyone with a Camden address will be included in the records exchange, making their recent hospital admissions, hospital-based lab and radiology results, medical tests, and discharge reports part of the database.
NEWS
October 7, 2009 | By Missy Stein
October has arrived, and so has Breast Cancer Awareness Month, as it has come to be known since 1985. For me and others who have been affected by the disease, breast cancer is something we are aware of 12 months a year. For the rest of the world, designating this month provides an opportunity for special events, media attention, and bringing a number of issues related to breast cancer to the forefront. I have one that doesn't get much attention. As a seven-year survivor of breast cancer, I am a cancer graduate.
NEWS
January 29, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tucked inside the $819 billion economic stimulus package that passed the House yesterday are provisions to spur the adoption of electronic medical records. The relatively modest $20 billion for health information technology would be, by far, the biggest government infusion to enable medical information to follow patients back and forth among doctors' offices, hospitals and other providers. If successful, experts say, electronic medical records would improve quality, reduce duplication of services, and limit errors - ultimately saving the nation hundreds of billions of dollars each year.
NEWS
October 10, 2008
SEN. McCAIN has chosen Gov. Palin, who is clearly unprepared to be the vice president during such a turbulent, chaotic, and pivotal time. So it's vital that voters know the facts about McCain's health and demand that his medical records be fully released. We have yet to see a full, public release of McCain's medical records. A "release" in May was restricted to about 20 reporters, and they were allowed only three hours to review 1,173 pages. They were not allowed to make copies, consult with medical experts or use cell phones or have Internet access during their review.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you haven't been in a hospital for a few years, you might be surprised at how technology aimed at making your stay safer and more enjoyable is emerging in this notoriously paperbound industry. Your doctor may wheel a computer into your room during an exam. Your nurse may scan the bar code on your ID bracelet before giving you a pill. If you face a long wait for a procedure, a hospital employee may give you a pager much like the ones those perpetually busy chain restaurants hand out. Your preemie may send you an e-mail.
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