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Medical Records

NEWS
January 29, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tucked inside the $819 billion economic stimulus package that passed the House yesterday are provisions to spur the adoption of electronic medical records. The relatively modest $20 billion for health information technology would be, by far, the biggest government infusion to enable medical information to follow patients back and forth among doctors' offices, hospitals and other providers. If successful, experts say, electronic medical records would improve quality, reduce duplication of services, and limit errors - ultimately saving the nation hundreds of billions of dollars each year.
NEWS
October 10, 2008
SEN. McCAIN has chosen Gov. Palin, who is clearly unprepared to be the vice president during such a turbulent, chaotic, and pivotal time. So it's vital that voters know the facts about McCain's health and demand that his medical records be fully released. We have yet to see a full, public release of McCain's medical records. A "release" in May was restricted to about 20 reporters, and they were allowed only three hours to review 1,173 pages. They were not allowed to make copies, consult with medical experts or use cell phones or have Internet access during their review.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you haven't been in a hospital for a few years, you might be surprised at how technology aimed at making your stay safer and more enjoyable is emerging in this notoriously paperbound industry. Your doctor may wheel a computer into your room during an exam. Your nurse may scan the bar code on your ID bracelet before giving you a pill. If you face a long wait for a procedure, a hospital employee may give you a pager much like the ones those perpetually busy chain restaurants hand out. Your preemie may send you an e-mail.
NEWS
March 14, 2006 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Disoriented and scared, Rosalyn Atkinson awoke crying and asked the nurse at her bedside a prophetic question: "Am I going to die?" It was Oct. 18, 2002, and Atkinson was on the 11th day of an 18-day odyssey that would take her from the Delaware County jail to a local hospital, back to jail, and then, as she feared, to her death. Officially, Atkinson, 25, died because of a fatal overdose of a single high-blood-pressure drug administered by jail infirmary staff, the Delaware County medical examiner determined.
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Patients can now create their own online medical records, receive electronic health alerts tailored to their ailments, and exchange e-mail with their doctors free of charge, under a service unveiled yesterday. The for-profit venture, called iHealthRecord, is part of an ongoing trend toward converting patient records, many of which still are maintained on paper, to the Internet. Health-care economists say conversion of patient records to databases linked to the Internet would save billions of dollars and greatly improve patient care by, among other things, helping to avoid medical errors.
NEWS
March 21, 2005
How can any regulation be called a "privacy rule" when it permits sharing Americans' most personal medical information with 800,000 or so health, business and government entities? Even a hospital gown offers more privacy, and this widespread access to medical records should leave patients with a different sort of chill running up the spine. How can they be open about their medical needs if traditional doctor-patient confidentiality has been eroded? Medical privacy rules put in place in 2003 under HIPPA - the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 - can make it harder to send someone flowers in the hospital, or check on their condition, than limit access to patient records.
NEWS
February 17, 2004
Was it only April? That's when Bush administration officials were touting their new federal privacy rules as a major advance in safeguarding Americans' personal medical data. By winter, though, Attorney General John Ashcroft's Justice Department was battling to obtain the medical records of patients in Philadelphia, Chicago, New York and elsewhere who underwent a controversial late-term abortion. Justice lawyers offered this startling rationale for their records request: Given "modern medical practice" and the involvement of third-party health insurers, they said, "individuals no longer possess a reasonable expectation that their histories will remain completely confidential.
NEWS
January 13, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Conservative radio commentator Rush Limbaugh got a birthday present yesterday from an unlikely new friend - the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU wants to join the fray in Limbaugh's right-to-privacy battle with Palm Beach County, Fla., prosecutors over his medical records, which were seized a month ago from four doctors as part of an investigation into Limbaugh's prescription drug use. Prosecutors, meanwhile, filed to dismiss the...
NEWS
April 11, 2003
Imagine this scene next fall: Monday Night Football reporter Melissa Stark is poised to report on the quarterback's injury - a body slam just witnessed by millions of TV viewers. But then hulking host John Madden breaks in breathlessly and announces, "Holy cow, Melissa, that information is private by federal law!" That's as silly as this potential scene at your family doctor's office: Staff clearing away cutesy bulletin-board photos and community news items about patients.
NEWS
April 13, 2001 | By Tony Pugh INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Despite strong opposition from the health-care industry, the Bush administration announced yesterday that it will implement the first federal standards to protect the privacy of patients' medical records. While the Bush administration intends to make some revisions to the rules - which originally were offered in the Clinton administration's final weeks - the regulations will limit the use and exchange of patient information by health-care professionals, employers, insurers and others.
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