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Medical Research

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NEWS
October 17, 2011 | WILKES-BARRE TIMES LEADER
SCRANTON - The Commonwealth Medical College has a new home in downtown Scranton. The college dedicated its $115 million Medical Sciences Building on Pine Street Saturday. "This building is wonderful. It represents so much . . .," interim president and dean Lois Nora said at the dedication ceremony. "It screams out proudly that TCMC is here and is pointing towards the future. " The 183,000-square-foot building is divided into two wings, one housing classroom space and the other housing laboratories.
NEWS
January 30, 2016
By Mary Woolley and Robert L. Bixby In passing a spending bill for 2016, Congress seemed to acknowledge that medical research had been cut too deeply for over a decade and agreed to boost funding for it in the coming months. But without reforms to address the basic structural problems in the federal budget, downward pressures on research and other important national priorities can be expected to continue. Consider what's at stake: Cutting-edge immunotherapy work at Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center to help achieve the goals of the "moonshot" initiative to cure cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1993 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hey, sports fans, fitness fanatics, celebrity seekers and just plain folks - here's an event just for you. What's more, it's for a good cause. It's Coriell Sports Day, a fund-raiser for the Camden-based Coriell Institute for Medical Research, hosted by jock-turned-country-club-gentleman Ron Jaworski, to be held at his Eagles' Nest Country Club in Sewell, Gloucester County, on July 11. Planned is a day of entertainment in what is the event's...
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marye H. Godinez, 68, of Bryn Mawr, a medical researcher and mother of six, died of lung cancer Thursday, May 29, at her home. Dr. Godinez, an early multitasker, pursued a passion for medical research on the biochemical nature of the lung while raising her children in Bryn Mawr. Son Paul said Dr. Godinez was a master at finding the balance between work and family. At one point, she told her children it was time for them to take on some of the responsibilities of running a home.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
About 2,800 medical researchers, hospital officials, and other medical professionals will gather in Boston from Dec. 1 to 4 to take part in the annual Human Research Protection Programs (HRPP) Conference and catch up on the latest issues facing their field. The field deals with medical research on human subjects, and amid all the presentations by those who have dedicated their lives to this work will be one by a Kennett High School student who hopes to one day join them: Julian Rose, 17, of Chadds Ford.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathryn Segesser says she believes the current thinking about eating disorders may be wrong. Segesser suspects that for centuries, anorexia and bulimia have afflicted both men and women. She would like to challenge the popular theory that blames modern cultural pressures and unrealistic images of beauty projected by lollipop-thin models. "I'm trying to see if, in the 18th century, people understood that there was some psychological reason that people decided not to eat," Segesser said.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Gov. Corbett, in his understandable zeal to cut spending, continues to make poor choices that in the long run will cost the state more than he expects to save. The governor's proposed budget for next fiscal year would effectively end the successful CURE program, which funds medical research at institutions across the state, and send its $60 million allocation in tobacco-settlement money to the state's general fund to pay for long-term care. Hello, governor, finding cures for cancer, or methods to improve treatment of other diseases, could help reduce the need for long-term care.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
By most standards, it was a very tough week for U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. His son, Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr., was convicted Thursday on federal bank- and tax-fraud charges. A formidable political foe, State Rep. Dwight Evans, on Monday said he will challenge Fattah's bid for a 12th term. And Fattah's own federal trial is slated to start six days after the Democratic primary election in April. Still, Fattah appeared engaged, upbeat, and popular with the public at events he attended Saturday.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MARY Anderson doesn't know where her son is. She knows that his skin and bones were buried at Northwood Cemetery. But Vance Anderson's brain, eyes and other internal organs never made it to his West Oak Lane grave site. The 51-year-old painter, who died in 2012 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications from a lung condition, was allegedly a hollowed-out shell by the time he was lowered into the ground - stripped for parts like a junkyard Chevy. Vance Anderson's insides were, in the words of a Jefferson doctor, "donated for education.
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NEWS
January 30, 2016
By Mary Woolley and Robert L. Bixby In passing a spending bill for 2016, Congress seemed to acknowledge that medical research had been cut too deeply for over a decade and agreed to boost funding for it in the coming months. But without reforms to address the basic structural problems in the federal budget, downward pressures on research and other important national priorities can be expected to continue. Consider what's at stake: Cutting-edge immunotherapy work at Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center to help achieve the goals of the "moonshot" initiative to cure cancer.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
By most standards, it was a very tough week for U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. His son, Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr., was convicted Thursday on federal bank- and tax-fraud charges. A formidable political foe, State Rep. Dwight Evans, on Monday said he will challenge Fattah's bid for a 12th term. And Fattah's own federal trial is slated to start six days after the Democratic primary election in April. Still, Fattah appeared engaged, upbeat, and popular with the public at events he attended Saturday.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Planned Parenthood is under attack by antiabortion activists over secretly recorded videos showing its executives candidly talking about supplying fetal tissue for medical research. This abortion-related controversy is providing grist for the many Republican presidential candidates hitting the trail. But it is also reviving public interest in fetal tissue research, which has yielded advances that have saved the lives of countless babies. Consider rubella. During a U.S. epidemic in the mid-1960s, an estimated 31,000 pregnant women infected with the virus suffered stillbirths, gave birth to severely disabled infants, or decided to end their pregnancies.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dr. Marvin E. Jaffe joined the former Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in 1970, son Jonathan said, he hit his stride. "During his career at Merck," his son wrote in an appreciation of his father, "he was responsible for bringing a number of first-in-class drugs" to market, such as Sinemet for Parkinson's disease and Mevacor for cholesterol treatment. And referring to the joint venture with the firm AB Astra, his son said, Dr. Jaffe "had an integral role in the Astra-Merck alliance, which resulted in the development" of the heartburn drug Prilosec.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a decade of flat federal funding, the American Association for Cancer Research, a 107-year-old Philadelphia nonprofit, has a new plan: raise more of its own money and boost its profile. "There's an enormous concern that we're losing the best minds in cancer research, and in medical research in general, to other fields, when they could be helping to save more lives from cancer and other diseases," said Margaret Foti, chief executive of AACR. For established cancer researchers, AACR's annual meeting, starting Saturday in Philadelphia and expected to draw 18,500, is a much-anticipated event.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was better to be late than sorry for Daquan Bohannan of North Philadelphia as he braved the rain, bumper-to-bumper mall parking, and throngs of last-minute Christmas shoppers at the Cherry Hill Mall on Wednesday. He had a mission: Pick bracelet charms for his mother, Nicole, 41, at Pandora, which by noon was packed to the brim with customers, almost all of them men on the hunt for gifts for mothers, girlfriends, or wives. It became so crowded an employee was stationed at the store entrance, having customers sign a waiting list to get in. "I just remembered yesterday that I had a few last-minute things to get," Bohannan said as he stood behind a jewelry counter, perusing a catalog.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Holtzer, 92, of West Philadelphia, a longtime professor and researcher in cell and developmental biology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at his home. Dr. Holtzer remained active in his research at Penn until a few years before his death. He is survived by his wife and research collaborator of 64 years, Sybil Holtzer. His research into the ways cells communicate was described as groundbreaking. "While doing research in the laboratory of Dr. Paul Weiss in Chicago, he did his first extraordinary experiments and made observations that historically are the foundation of much of the molecular work on inductive signals between tissues and how cells communicate during development," said Bernice J. Koplin, his estate lawyer.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter H. Sellers, 84, of Philadelphia, one of the early pioneers of DNA research, died Saturday, Nov. 15, of cancer at home. Dr. Sellers was the ninth generation of Philadelphia's first family of scientists and engineers, according to D. Vitiello, writing in Engineering Philadelphia, published by Cornell University Press in 2014. Beginning in 1966, Dr. Sellers spent 48 years as a senior research scientist at Rockefeller University. The university called him "a brilliant and pioneering mathematician whose [work]
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research is suing a Camden nonprofit, saying it compromised nearly 26,000 research tubes when a freezer door was left open in March. The tubes of blood and other fluids were stored at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research along Haddon Avenue, and would have been used to study the causes of Parkinson's disease, according to the lawsuit. It was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in New Jersey. Fox's foundation, according to the suit, signed two contracts - one in 2010, the other 2011 - worth a combined $4.3 million to store the tubes at Coriell.
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