CollectionsMedical School
IN THE NEWS

Medical School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two hundred and fifty young men and women walked into a Center City hotel conference room yesterday afternoon, a colorful array of suits and ties, slacks and dresses. They all walked out clothed in the same starched white coat. Amid a backdrop of hope and jitters, and basking in the loving gaze of family and friends, the first-year medical students at MCP/Hahnemann School of Medicine joined at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel in a White-Coat Ceremony, the symbolic beginning to their professional career.
NEWS
July 31, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathryn "Brooke" Baxter, 32, formerly of New Hope, a student at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, died Sunday in a bus accident in Tanzania. Ms. Baxter was in Africa for the summer as a volunteer for the Lwala Community Alliance in Kenya, working with pregnant women infected with HIV and malaria. She was commissioned as an Army lieutenant last summer, and had completed her first year of medical school on an Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship.
NEWS
October 15, 1998
Nightmare, disaster, catastrophe, an unholy mess. We're running out of descriptions to match the desperate situation of the Allegheny health care system. Just when it seems it can't get worse, it gets worse. Now, with Drexel University's rejection of a plan to manage the Allegheny medical school, the deal to buy eight local hospitals could fail. Tenet Healthcare bid a fire-sale price of $345 million for the hospitals, which translates to only a few cents on the dollar for Allegheny's 80,000 creditors.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a University of Pennsylvania cocktail party recently, business magnate Ray Perelman expounded on why he had bestowed $225 million on Penn's medical school - a gift that means the place now bears his name. David L. Cohen, the Comcast executive and chair of Penn's board of trustees, recalled listening intently as Perelman talked about the university's role in health care, civic life, and so on. Suddenly, Perelman paused. "If it wasn't for that man, I would never have made this gift," Perelman said, pointing over Cohen's shoulder at a slender fellow who had walked nearby.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Medical education is in a crisis. According to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine, half of 4,287 students surveyed at seven medical schools experienced burnout and 10 percent expressed suicidal ideation. And doctors aren't much better off; a second study in JAMA Internal Medicine of 7,288 physicians showed that almost half had experienced some symptom of burnout. The public image of doctors hasn't fared well, either. While the popular notion of doctors was once the wise and avuncular Marcus Welby, M.D., more recent portrayals tend toward Dr. Gregory House, a brilliant but annoying know-it-all with a decided God complex.
NEWS
September 4, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surgeon John M. Daly, a graduate of Temple University's School of Medicine, was named the school's new dean yesterday. Daly has been chairman of the department of surgery at Weill Medical College at Cornell University in New York City and surgeon-in-chief at the New York Presbyterian Hospital at Cornell since 1993. His specialty is surgical oncology. Daly will take over Nov. 1 for Richard Kozera, the acting dean of the medical school since January, when former dean Leon Malmud stepped down to resume teaching.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lewis Katz's mother always wanted him to be a doctor, but he couldn't stand the sight of blood and didn't much like dissection. So he went to law school instead, and then made a fortune in parking, banking, billboards, and real estate. Wednesday, his alma mater announced that Temple University's medical school will be named after the longtime member of the university's board of trustees and the largest donor in the school's history. "I got the second-best thing for her," said Katz, 72. "She's got to be smiling today.
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey has put a brake on plans to take over Camden County's Lakeland hospital as a teaching institution, thereby skirting an increasingly testy political feud over the facility. Dr. Frederick J. Humphrey, dean of the School of Osteopathic Medicine, wrote to Camden County Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero last week that the university would be unable to offer an immediate proposal to affiliate with the county's embattled hospital, the Camden County Health Services Complex at Lakeland.
NEWS
May 12, 1986 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Martin Goldberg, chairman of the department of internal medicine at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and an authority in the field of kidney disease, has been named dean of the Temple University School of Medicine. Goldberg, 55, a Philadelphia native, was chief of the Kidney Disease Section of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) between 1967 and 1979, when he went to Cincinnati. He will assume his new post July 1, succeeding Dr. Sol Sherry, who has been interim dean for two years, Temple President Peter J. Liacouras announced today.
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every so often, Jayne Robertson and Kevin McGibney get to wondering whether there will be enough time for them to get it all done. "Let's see," McGibney was saying last week at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, 3300 Henry Ave., where he and Robertson are students. "We'll graduate in 1991, do four years' residency, and -. " "And all the while," Robertson said, interrupting, "the clock will be running on us. " Jayne Robertson and Kevin McGibney, see, are pretty special people at the medical school.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the high schoolers last week could diagnose their patient, who had come in with liver issues, they had to figure out how the liver works. There were the hepatic veins and the hepatic artery - but how were they related? Could the connections among the blood vessels shed light on this man's condition? In one room at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, eight high school juniors and seniors in the medical school's inaugural MEDacademy high school summer program searched for answers on their phones, tablets, and laptops.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
SOME PEOPLE stumble aimlessly through life, hoping to find purpose before their hourglass runs out of sand. Jasmine Wright wasn't one of them. "She had a promising future, she was definitely going to make a difference," said Wright's former roommate at Penn State University, who spoke with the Daily News last night on condition of anonymity. "It's beyond sad that her future got cut down so early. " At 27, Wright already had traveled the world in relentless pursuit of something simple, pure, noble - helping the less fortunate.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard C. Goos was president of the West Jersey Medical Society in 1965-66, though the organization did not have the geographical significance that its name might have implied. The society was limited to the medical staff at West Jersey Hospital - now Virtua - where Dr. Goos was a staff anesthesiologist. "West Jersey was a very small hospital" in those years, Dr. Goos' wife, Norma, said. And so, in a spirit of camaraderie, the physicians, "not too many, met every month and had a speaker.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Jack and Neha exercised at the same Center City CrossFit and knew each other by first name. Based on interactions during class, she thought he was "out there, loud, funny, and obviously very strong. " He thought - so erroneously - that she was quiet and shy. In July 2011, the class crew gathered socially to celebrate one trainer's 21st birthday, first at the gym, then at a bar around the corner. Neha and Jack started chatting, and had a lot of fun doing it. "I was so surprised by what her true personality is like," Jack remembered.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - A new nonprofit development corporation, first proposed by Gov. Christie's Atlantic City advisory commission, is in talks to bring the South Jersey Gas headquarters and a Rowan University medical school to struggling Atlantic City. The Atlantic City Development Corporation, or AC Devco, is an offshoot of the New Brunswick Development Corporation, and for the time being is chaired by Jon F. Hanson, who chaired the governor's Atlantic City commission that recommended its creation.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Quick! When a person is deprived of oxygen, which part of the brain is damaged first? When Michael Natter learned the answer - the hippocampus, among other key regions - he promptly drew a cartoon of a dopey hippopotamus hooked to an oxygen tank. Artist's sketchbook in hand, Natter, 29, is drawing his way through medical school at Thomas Jefferson University. He says his art helps him remember and digest the torrent of information. "I study by drawing my notes," says the native New Yorker, who just wrapped up his second year.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may be the fact that Atul Gawande is a doctor - a Harvard doctor, yet - that draws readers to his books on our flawed medical system. But he wouldn't make the best-seller lists if he wrote - or thought - like most doctors. This is a guy with one of those renaissance-man resum├ęs that makes even quite accomplished people look like slackers. Stanford undergrad. Rhodes scholar studying philosophy. Health-care adviser to President Bill Clinton. Medical degree and master's in public health from Harvard.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard A. Steiner, 73, of Moorestown, who retired in the late 1990s as an Army osteopathic physician, died of complications from pancreatic cancer on Sunday, Dec. 7, at his home. Until earlier this year, Dr. Steiner was a physician at the Concentra Medical Center in Pennsauken, his son, Christopher, said. Born in Philadelphia, Dr. Steiner graduated from Father Judge High School, and earned bachelor's degrees in accounting and biology at La Salle University, and a doctorate in osteopathy at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.
REAL_ESTATE
November 30, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
The couple loved their Fairmount neighborhood and living near the Philadelphia Museum of Art, until their older son turned 5 and did not win a lottery place in a charter school or a public school they liked. Mario Gentile, an architect, and wife Theresa Birardi, a family physician, had met at Oceanside High School on the south shore of Long Island and moved to Philadelphia after she finished medical school and he completed his master's degree at Columbia University. They treasured living in the city.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|