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Medical School

NEWS
December 31, 2006 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Gov. Corzine signed a bill this month to provide $270 million for stem-cell research in New Jersey, he talked about funding a science that could one day change the medical landscape. On the landscape of Camden, that money could have a much more immediate impact. Included in the bill is $50 million for a new stem-cell research center in the struggling city. The center, to be operated by a consortium of the state's medical and research heavyweights, has been proposed for a stretch of Broadway near Cooper University Hospital.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The South Jersey Port Corp. board unanimously approved a lease yesterday that will move a drug-treatment facility from downtown Camden, where it is in the way of plans for a new medical school, to the city's Delaware River waterfront. The measure, approved without comment from the governor's appointees on the board, was roundly condemned by activists from the Waterfront South community, who said powerful political forces had forsaken one neighborhood to favor another. "It is a hell of a day when the revival of one community depends on the death of another," said Patrick Mulligan, assistant director of Heart of Camden, a nonprofit in Waterfront South, where the clinic will be moved.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Staff writer Andrea Gerlin contributed to this article
Don't expect the Allegheny name to disappear this week. Tenet Healthcare Corp., which had been expected to close its purchase of eight Allegheny hospitals tomorrow, was granted a delay yesterday after citing its failure to find an academic institution to manage the health system's university. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge M. Bruce McCullough agreed to postpone a hearing on the future of Allegheny University of the Health Sciences until Nov. 5. McCullough quickly granted the delay requested by Tenet and Allegheny, saying, "I can't force anybody to do anything.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff Cuomo went to Hahnemann University knowing exactly what kind of doctor he wants to be: one of those high-priced specialists that have fallen out of favor lately. A sports enthusiast who has had four knee operations, Cuomo wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. Not for the money, he says. For the satisfaction. Cuomo likes a job that you can finish, a problem you can fix. That's why he's more comfortable with surgery than primary care. In primary care, the patients come in with chronic problems that never seem to get much better.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2002 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The trustees of Drexel University unanimously approved a deal yesterday to take permanent control of MCP Hahnemann University in Philadelphia and its schools of medicine, nursing and public health. "This is a historic moment for this institution and the proudest moment of my presidency," Constantine Papadakis, president of Drexel, said after the vote. MCP Hahnemann, the nation's largest privately funded medical school, will officially become part of Drexel on July 1. The nursing and public health schools will merge into the main university.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Elisa Ung and Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In plans that could stitch together the goals of transforming downtown Camden into a health-care and college mecca, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey is looking to expand its campus significantly, with the possibility of bringing a four-year medical school to the city. The university is in preliminary discussions with the city to construct at least two multistory buildings with space for classrooms, clinical care, research, education and retail. The school is studying building on a block near Cooper University Hospital.
NEWS
February 23, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The head of the medical school and health system at the University of Pennsylvania was the nation's fourth-highest-paid private college employee two years ago, trailing only a football coach, a dermatology professor, and a health-affairs chief, according to a report released today by the Chronicle of Higher Education. Arthur H. Rubenstein's compensation was $3.3 million in fiscal 2007, the most recent year for which data were available, the Chronicle said. Pete Carroll, head football coach at the University of Southern California, was the top-paid employee, with compensation of $4.4 million, according to the report.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allegheny University's combined MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine is projecting a $33 million deficit in the next fiscal year, and to offset the shortfall, the school's academic departments are expected to generate revenues that equal twice faculty members' salaries. That's the message Donald Kaye, president and chief executive of Allegheny University of the Health Sciences, delivered yesterday to grim-faced faculty members. "The only way the budget becomes balanced is when each department as a unit doubles [its revenues compared to what it pays]
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Supreme Court said yesterday that it would use a Philadelphia case to rule on whether teaching hospitals can seek government reimbursement for the multimillion-dollar cost of training young doctors who work with elderly and disabled patients. Under the Medicare program, hospitals are paid for their direct costs of providing interns and residents. But the government has balked at paying the extra training costs normally borne by an affiliated medical school. The lower courts have split on whether the government's position is reasonable, and the justices announced yesterday that they would resolve the question this spring in the case of Thomas Jefferson University v. Shalala.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Saturday, Sharon Seltzer was partway through the first section of what may be the most important test of her life - the one that will determine whether she gets into medical school - when she realized something was terribly wrong. She was answering questions designed to measure verbal reasoning. A premed junior at the University of Pennsylvania, she's a science person and this was definitely the hardest part of the test for her. She had to read passages about a subject, then answer questions to show how well she understood what she had read.
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