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NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When leaders of the nation's medical schools and teaching hospitals begin six days of meetings here Friday, they will have plenty to talk about. There will be sessions about better ways to keep people healthy and out of the hospital, and about initiatives to ensure that the students admitted to medical schools are not only smart enough to be doctors but have the social skills they will need to be effective. But lurking everywhere will be the question of how institutions will do more with less, with government funding in limbo, the full impact of the Affordable Care Act still unknown, and general pressure to reduce costs.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard A. Krull, 97, of Haddon Township, a former internal medicine physician in Teaneck, N.J., who earned a Bronze Star in World War II, died Monday, Sept. 9, at Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice in Mount Holly. He had lived in Haddon Township since 2006. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he graduated from Abraham Lincoln High School in January 1933, and earned a bachelor's degree at New York University in 1936, a master's at the University of Cincinnati in 1937, and his medical degree there in 1941.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carly Sokach didn't have much interest in research. For her, it was simply an obligatory requirement for her to apply to medical school. But that changed this summer when the University of Pennsylvania rising junior began working on research that inspired her: She studied whether a questionnaire could tell doctors if a patient with ulcerative colitis was in remission, rather than resorting to a colonoscopy, an invasive procedure. She spent much of her time talking to patients who had the disease.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Y. Cooper III, 88, emeritus professor in the department of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania and a longtime surgical researcher, died Friday, Aug. 2, of cancer at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. A 1948 graduate of Penn's medical school, Dr. Cooper was widely known for his work on the cytochrome P-450, a series of enzymes involved in drug metabolism. In layman's terms, Dr. Cooper was looking at how the enzymes acquired the ability to perform biological functions in the body, and why. The goal was to better understand how medicines break down once they are taken or administered.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Joe Mandak, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - A University of Pittsburgh medical researcher was charged with homicide in the death of his wife, a neurologist at the university's medical school, authorities said Thursday, and Pittsburgh police were in Florida to arrest him. Robert Ferrante, 64, allegedly laced an energy supplement with cyanide before giving it to Autumn Klein, 41, hours after they exchanged text messages about how the supplement could help them conceive a child, according...
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH - A University of Pittsburgh medical researcher accused of poisoning his neurologist wife with a supplement she apparently thought would help them have a baby was arrested yesterday in West Virginia, authorities said. Dr. Robert Ferrante laced an energy supplement with cyanide and gave it to Dr. Autumn Klein, a neurologist at the university's medical school, hours after they exchanged text messages about how the supplement could help them conceive, according to a police complaint unsealed yesterday.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephanie Yen-Mun Liem Azar was used to being told she was too young to do something. Too young at age 6 to learn to play a church organ. Too young at 16 to leave her family in Haverford and live on her own in Philadelphia while attending the Curtis Institute of Music. Too young at 20 for medical school. Her parents, Gie and Lisa Liem, discovered early on that they couldn't slow her down. She accomplished those goals, and much more, before she did something that was tragically premature.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brian L. Strom is having trouble sleeping. Not just because the physician - currently executive vice dean for institutional affairs at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine - soon will give up teaching, his primary care practice, and the research that has brought him national recognition. No, Strom said, he is kept up nights with anticipation. In December, Strom will join Rutgers University as chancellor of its newly created Biomedical and Health Sciences umbrella organization, overseeing 14 schools and units, including pieces of the defunct University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
A senior administrator from the University of Pennsylvania's medical school will join Rutgers University to lead its newly organized medical organization, which oversees a collection of schools and units that include ones from the defunct University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Brian L. Strom, the executive vice dean for institutional affairs at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine and a professor at that school, will leave to take up the position Dec. 2 as inaugural chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
George M. Arnas, 81, a former obstetrician and gynecologist in Philadelphia and South Jersey, died of pancreatic cancer Friday, June 14, at Cadbury at Cherry Hill, a continuing care community. Born in Weirton, W. Va., Dr. Arnas worked during high school and college summers in a steel mill there, where his father, Manolis, an immigrant from Greece, was a foreman. Dr. Arnas graduated third in his class at Follansbee High School in 1949 and earned a premed bachelor's degree at West Virginia University, daughter Angelique Aeillo said.
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