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Medical School

NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Camden's graduation rate has increased for the fourth straight year, school district officials said Thursday, and stood at 64 percent for the last school year. The graduation rate for the 2011-12 school year was 49 percent. The state took over the district the following year, with Gov. Christie appointing Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard to lead the city's schools. Almost 80 more students graduated last year than in 2011, district officials said. Not only has the overall rate improved, but the graduation rate among Latino students has increased from 44 percent to 66 percent since 2012, Rouhanifard said Thursday at a panel discussion among students at Brimm Medical Arts High School, one of the city's three magnet high schools.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Peter Cameron, SCRANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE
SCRANTON - After a career in surgery that spanned four decades, Gino Mori decided to head back to medical school in 2013 to fill some gaps in his education. After all, he completed his undergraduate education in science at Pennsylvania State University in 1953, the year scientists James Watson and Francis Crick are credited with discovering the structure of DNA. "You can imagine that basic science had changed quite a bit," he said with a smile. The 83-year-old physician completed about 40,000 surgeries in his 371/2 years in medicine, but after retiring Jan. 1, 2001, his lifelong thirst for knowledge pushed him back to school.
NEWS
December 22, 2015
E DMUND KLIMEK, 52, of Plainsboro, Middlesex County, N.J., is managing partner of KSS Architects in Center City. The full-service architecture, planning and interior-design firm - which also has offices in Princeton - was founded in 1983. It has since broadened its scope, with notable projects in the startup community, higher education, corporate headquarters and charter schools. The firm focuses on collaborative and innovative work spaces and projects with social impact. Q: Tell me about your recent projects.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Kathleen Tinney and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
Henry M. Rowan, 92, an inventive engineer and industrialist whose historic $100 million donation transformed modest Glassboro State College into the regionally acclaimed university that carries his name, died Wednesday at an assisted-living residence in Bucks County. In 1992, Mr. Rowan and his wife, Betty, set the record for the largest gift to a public college in the history of American higher education. While the couple had no connection to the school, they did occupy the same state.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steven M. Altschuler, who retired in June after a 15-year tenure as chief executive of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, has been named senior vice president of health affairs at the University of Miami and chief executive officer of UHealth-University of Miami Health System. Altschuler, 62, starts his new job Jan. 1. The University of Miami system had $1.44 billion in net patient revenue in the fiscal year ending May 31. The system includes a medical school, a 560-bed hospital, a cancer center, and an eye hospital.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to a still-mysterious condition known as Castleman disease, David Fajgenbaum, a professor of hematology/oncology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, is more than an advocate or a physician/scientist: He is also a patient. Addressing a team of volunteers for the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), Fajgenbaum quickly details on a white board what is known about CD, a group of poorly understood inflammatory disorders that can vary from a single enlarged lymph node to life-threatening multiple organ failure.
NEWS
November 16, 2015
D EAR ABBY: When reading letters in your column concerning breast cancer, my heart goes out to every single person who has ever been diagnosed with this terrible disease. I have no respect for any man who cuts and runs when his wife is diagnosed with cancer. But what do you think about a woman who is diagnosed and whose husband remains with her through the fear and worry, the chemo, radiation, hair loss and all the follow-up? A husband who worries constantly for her and whose biggest fear is losing his wonderful wife, and after all this - she leaves him for another man?
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Drew Katz wants to feel his father's presence, he puts on a pair of Lewis Katz's size 11 sneakers. They fit perfectly. "I actually literally walk in his shoes," Katz said. On Tuesday, Katz, 44, will stand in for his father when Temple University officially names its medical school after the late Temple grad - an entrepreneur and philanthropist who made his fortune in parking, banking, billboards, and real estate and went on to become the largest donor in the university's history.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elaine Catherine Pierson Mastroianni, 89, of Bryn Mawr, a physician and the author of Sex Is Never an Emergency , a sexual-health guide for young adults, died Saturday, Oct. 3, of lung cancer at home. Dr. Pierson's slim paperback appeared on campuses a decade before Dr. Ruth Westheimer suggested a frank approach to human sexuality, and three years before Our Bodies, Ourselves , a landmark book on sex, was released. "My primary objective of this little book is to prevent unwanted pregnancies and, secondarily, to help students be more comfortable with their level of sexuality, whatever that level is," she wrote.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edith Mitchell grew up in the "very segregated" farming town of Brownsville, Tenn., at a time when it was unusual for a little girl of any race to dream of becoming a doctor. But she says that she decided, at age 3, to go to medical school after being impressed by the African American doctor who made a house call to her ailing great-grandfather. When she announced her ambition, no one tried to stop her. "You can be whatever you want to be," said her great-grandfather, who died not long after that visit.
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