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Medical School

NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Milagros Torres joined a chorus of parents advocating for alternatives to public schools in Camden after her 9-year-old daughter was attacked in March by bullies in a Thomas H. Dudley Elementary School bathroom. Moneke Ragsdale, however, says it was the Lanning Square School, a traditional, public elementary school, that made sure her son Eric Lee wouldn't fall behind. Lee, now 19, went on to graduate with honors from Camden High School, just finished his first year at Camden County College, and hopes to go on to medical school.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " No one can say I did not try. I spent an entire afternoon giving my children a lesson in what I would like for my Mother's Day meal. But did I get miso-marinated cod with mushroom risotto? Of course not. Since my oldest son was the only one able to make it home, my husband pitched in. And what did they make? Chicken fajitas. Well, I do love chicken fajitas. And Tim added his first blog post. Tim: My mom asked me to take over blogging duties for my sister who is heading to medical school in July (congratulations Sally!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | Carolyn Hax
Question: Father helped send two sons to law school, though they have student loan debt they'll be paying for decades. Father has much younger stepdaughter. The sons are not particularly close with father's "new" family. Stepdaughter plans to go to medical school. Sons suspect that financial support for her will be greater than they received. Should they insist the stepdaughter receive the same? Less? Don't sons have right to better treatment? Answer: Ugh, no. First of all, "sons suspect" is not the same thing as "sons know," so treating suspicions as actionable facts is a bad idea to begin with.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has agreed to pay the U.S. government $412,474 to settles claims stemming from two fraud schemes by a hospital department chairman and a trio of plastic surgeons that netted more than $4.5 million. Dr. Joseph J. Kubacki, former Chairman of Temple's Ophthalmology Department, was convicted in August on 73 counts of health care fraud, 73 counts of making false statements, and four counts of wire fraud. Kubacki, also a professor at the medical school and an attending physician at Temple University Hospital, billed federal agencies more than $1.5 million claiming he had performed services at the hospital performed by residents when he wasn't there.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By John P. Martin and Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writers
The two men followed starkly different paths to the witness stand. The 49-year-old was raised in the outer suburbs, graduated from medical school, got married, and had five children. The 23-year-old from Northeast Philadelphia was kicked out of two high schools, attempted suicide, and spent much of the last decade hooked on heroin and prescription drugs. But in tense and emotional testimony to a Common Pleas Court jury Wednesday, both former altar boys described a bond: Each said he was sexually abused by his parish priest, Edward Avery.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer is presenting a daily profile of participants in the May 6 Blue Cross Broad Street Run, considered the country's most popular 10-miler, with 40,000 people. See full coverage at www.philly.com/broadstreetrun . Kate Zalesky, 25, was never an athlete. She was the girl in high school who dreaded the annual day in gym when she had to run a timed mile. She was the kid running a 15-minute mile and dying by the end. She was the typical video-game and book nerd.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - A dozen or so high-level Democrats and top university officials have been meeting privately in recent weeks to discuss ways of tweaking Gov. Christie's plan to restructure three New Jersey universities so it is more acceptable to opponents. The meetings involve well-known Democratic leaders and at least four members of the Rutgers Board of Governors, whose approval is needed to make the plan happen. Legislative sign-off is also likely necessary for at least parts of the plan, which Christie wants agreement on by July.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Edward Colimore,Darran Simon,and Frank Kummer, STAFF WRITERS
A Gloucester County doctor who shot and killed his former colleague at Virtua before committing suicide Wednesday apparently believed the victim was behind his alleged dismissal from the hospital's medical residency program. Authorities said Giocondo "Joe" Navek, 39, shot Payman Houshmandpour, 32, a resident at Virtua, multiple times at 7:30 a.m. as the victim prepared to leave for work from his home at The Club at Main Street in Voorhees. Houshmandpour had just said goodbye to his wife and their 20-month-old infant and was pulling his silver Audi out of a parking space when Navek approached him. Navek, a former Virtua resident, fired through Houshmandpour's car window and was driving away in a silver Nissan when police stopped him about a mile away on Centennial Boulevard, authorities said.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
Perhaps best known for the two-wheeled vehicle called the Segway, Dean Kamen has also invented the wearable insulin pump, a home dialysis machine, a high-tech prosthetic arm, and a wheelchair that can climb stairs. He was in Philadelphia last week to foster support for FIRST, the national robotics competition for elementary and high school students, which has a regional contest Thursday through Saturday at Temple University's Liacouras Center. The finals are later this month in St. Louis.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In January 1957, Dr. John B. Flick Jr. cut out of the heart of a 9-year-old girl a bullet that had been lodged there for 17 days. "Doctors said every time her heart beat, the bullet pushed against the wall of the heart," the Evening Bulletin reported. "In time, they said, it would have worn a hole in the muscle. " Thanks to Dr. Flick, the spent bullet became a belated Christmas present for the girl. "He followed up on her a couple of years later, and she was doing fine," Dr. Flick's daughter, Louise, said in an interview.
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