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Medical Science

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NEWS
August 9, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberals may carp that the President has a hard heart. But no one can quibble with its efficiency. The thing's a Swiss clock, a slow-tocking metronome, a humming Texas motor that could very well rank George W. Bush among the world's fittest people - in comparable shape to most professional basketball players, college football players, and major-league baseball players. That's the interpretation of some fitness experts who were wowed by one startling piece of data released by the White House after Bush's medical checkup Saturday: The man's resting heart rate is 43 beats per minute.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
MEDICAL marijuana is a non-issue and a contradiction in terms. If you're ill, especially if you suffer from cancer, the solution is not to light leaves on fire and suck the smoke into your lungs. Smoking causes cancer. Medical science has proven that. This is nothing more than a ploy by pot-heads to legalize their drug of choice. If this wasn't true, then why do these same people pushing for this scoff at the idea of cannabis in pill form? Which by the way already exists, but that takes all the fun out of the experience, doesn't it?
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walter Lord Obold, 95, former head of the biological science department of Drexel University, died of congestive heart failure Friday at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. He lived in Havertown. At the time of his death, Mr. Obold was emeritus professor of biological science at Drexel, where he had been a member of the faculty from 1930 until his retirement as head of the department in 1968. When he was there, it was known as the Drexel Institute of Technology. In 1952, he was Fulbright lecturer and visiting professor at the University of Alexandria as well as at Ibrahim University and the University of Cairo, all in Egypt.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
A WORD IN YOUR EAR Be careful out there today, you hear? Not only can Fourth of July fireworks blow off your fingers, they can blow out your eardrums. If fireworks cause a hearing loss that lasts longer than a day, see a doctor, says Dale Lowry, professor of otolaryngology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. IN VITRO FERTILIZATION If in vitro fertilization does not work within seven tries, it probably never will. That's according to a study by Hilton Kort, an investigator at Reproductive Biology Associates in Atlanta.
NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Anthony M. Alberico, 89, a retired family physician and medical director for the Philadelphia Police and Fire Medical Association, died Saturday, Oct. 2, of progressive supranuclear palsy, a neurological disorder, at home in Westmont. For 28 years, Dr. Alberico practiced family medicine in Fishtown and then in the Northwood section of Philadelphia. He was chief of medicine and director of medical education at St. Mary Hospital in Fishtown and was medical director of St. Mary Hospital in Langhorne when it opened in 1973.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
If the many recent reports of child abuse and abandonment suggest the world has gone haywire, "Lorenzo's Oil" is proof that it hasn't, at least not entirely. The movie is based on the true story of a couple's iron-willed, almost fanatical devotion to their stricken child, though to call it uplifting would be inaccurate. It is an ordeal - long, demanding and critical of its characters and the world they inhabit. It is, in form, much like one of those disease-of-the-week melodramas often seen on television.
NEWS
July 20, 2001
Politics has produced few heroes of late. But Bill Frist, Republican senator from Tennessee, delivered a heroic speech Wednesday on the second great policy issue (after cloning) to arise from the biotech revolution: stem-cell research that relies on cells harvested from unused embryos. It's the kind of dilemma - medical breakthroughs vs. the sanctity of human life - that turns the Capitol into the national chicken coop, full of fearful people looking for a way out. Enter Bill Frist, physician-senator, a man versed in both medical science and conservative values, a determined foe of abortion.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | BY PETE DEXTER
Back in 1981, a 58-year old man named Riccardo Addobati happened to be watching television one day when he saw a public-service announcement for donor organs, and believed that someone wanted to use part or all of his body after he was gone. Riccardo's older brother had died the year before of a heart attack, and that put him in a reflective mood. "I thought, it could have been me," he said. "And that one day it would be me, and it seemed at the time that it would be a wonderful thing to donate my body, giving life to someone else or advancing medical science.
NEWS
January 3, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
No, acne won't kill you. But it may be killing your self-esteem and, in turn, your social life. Teens have known this for years. Now medical science is acknowledging it too. "Acne is an assault on a teen's self-image and affects what they will do - whether they will try out for the school play, athletic teams or class office," said Dr. Diane Baker, a dermatologist in Portland, Ore. "It makes them less outgoing, less willing to take...
SPORTS
June 20, 1989 | By Angelo Cataldi and Glen Macnow, Inquirer Staff Writers
NFL center Dave Rimington fails his preseason physical examination with the Cincinnati Bengals and is released. He comes to Philadelphia, where he passes the physical and starts all 16 games for the Eagles in 1988. Which conclusion can fairly be drawn: 1.) The Bengals, still smarting over a bitter contract battle with Rimington, used the physical as an opportunity to get rid of him, or, 2.) The Eagles, desperate for offensive line help, have lower medical standards than the Bengals.
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NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
    A BIPARTISAN trio of U.S. senators - New Jersey's Cory Booker, New York's Kirsten Gillibrand and Kentucky's Rand Paul - are sponsoring a bill to classify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, meaning that the federal government would allow it to be used as medicine. Some critics worry that such a bill could become a "gateway law" to full legalization of recreational weed; defenders say that sick patients need the pain relief best provided by marijuana. Should the bill get approval?
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AS I WRITE THIS, Sarah Murnaghan is in the O.R. at CHOP, undergoing a lung transplant. So Steven Hanratty, Jeff Brown, Jason Billig and Rasheed Turner can hang on to their own lungs for the time being. The men had contacted me, separately, after reading my recent column about how desperately Sarah - a 10-year-old dying of cystic fibrosis - needed a lung transplant to save her life. Each had volunteered to give her a lung if medical science allowed it. (It does. But the procedure is rare because the surgery is so risky.)
NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Anthony M. Alberico, 89, a retired family physician and medical director for the Philadelphia Police and Fire Medical Association, died Saturday, Oct. 2, of progressive supranuclear palsy, a neurological disorder, at home in Westmont. For 28 years, Dr. Alberico practiced family medicine in Fishtown and then in the Northwood section of Philadelphia. He was chief of medicine and director of medical education at St. Mary Hospital in Fishtown and was medical director of St. Mary Hospital in Langhorne when it opened in 1973.
NEWS
October 28, 2007 | By TOM AVRIL, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was her first day back at work - a full slate of faculty meetings - and Lisa Mullenax might as well have been at home. That was where her mind was. She had spent the summer falling in love with her baby, Lucas, but now it was August, back to work to pay the mortgage. As the meetings droned on, the young teacher consoled herself that school was just two minutes away from home in State College, Pa. The baby was with his father, Alejandro Mendez Vargas, a tender spirit who was so good with Lucas that her mother teasingly called him "Mr. Mom. " It would be OK. But then, as Lisa was getting out supplies for her Spanish classroom, her return to daily routine suddenly crumbled.
NEWS
October 28, 2007 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was her first day back at work - a full slate of faculty meetings - and Lisa Mullenax might as well have been at home. That was where her mind was. She had spent the summer falling in love with her baby, Lucas, but now it was August, back to work to pay the mortgage. As the meetings droned on, the young teacher consoled herself that school was just two minutes away from home in State College, Pa. The baby was with his father, Alejandro Mendez Vargas, a tender spirit who was so good with Lucas that her mother teasingly called him "Mr. Mom. " It would be OK. But then, as Lisa was getting out supplies for her Spanish classroom, her return to daily routine suddenly crumbled.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
MEDICAL marijuana is a non-issue and a contradiction in terms. If you're ill, especially if you suffer from cancer, the solution is not to light leaves on fire and suck the smoke into your lungs. Smoking causes cancer. Medical science has proven that. This is nothing more than a ploy by pot-heads to legalize their drug of choice. If this wasn't true, then why do these same people pushing for this scoff at the idea of cannabis in pill form? Which by the way already exists, but that takes all the fun out of the experience, doesn't it?
NEWS
June 23, 2004 | By S. Reid Warren 3d
In his June 16 commentary, "Death be not fittingly handled," Mark Dixon wrote of "the prolonged honor and homage paid" to former President Ronald Reagan at his funeral. He then contrasted that with what he sees as the too-often cavalier nature of memorial services without the body and the coffin "as we dispose of our loved ones as quickly and as discreetly as week-old fish. " Mr. Dixon's column leaves out the wishes of the ones who have died and the wishes of their living relatives.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberals may carp that the President has a hard heart. But no one can quibble with its efficiency. The thing's a Swiss clock, a slow-tocking metronome, a humming Texas motor that could very well rank George W. Bush among the world's fittest people - in comparable shape to most professional basketball players, college football players, and major-league baseball players. That's the interpretation of some fitness experts who were wowed by one startling piece of data released by the White House after Bush's medical checkup Saturday: The man's resting heart rate is 43 beats per minute.
NEWS
July 20, 2001
Politics has produced few heroes of late. But Bill Frist, Republican senator from Tennessee, delivered a heroic speech Wednesday on the second great policy issue (after cloning) to arise from the biotech revolution: stem-cell research that relies on cells harvested from unused embryos. It's the kind of dilemma - medical breakthroughs vs. the sanctity of human life - that turns the Capitol into the national chicken coop, full of fearful people looking for a way out. Enter Bill Frist, physician-senator, a man versed in both medical science and conservative values, a determined foe of abortion.
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walter Lord Obold, 95, former head of the biological science department of Drexel University, died of congestive heart failure Friday at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. He lived in Havertown. At the time of his death, Mr. Obold was emeritus professor of biological science at Drexel, where he had been a member of the faculty from 1930 until his retirement as head of the department in 1968. When he was there, it was known as the Drexel Institute of Technology. In 1952, he was Fulbright lecturer and visiting professor at the University of Alexandria as well as at Ibrahim University and the University of Cairo, all in Egypt.
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