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Medical Students

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NEWS
August 12, 1994 | By Meiyue Zhou, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some of the most frustrating and, perhaps, the most rewarding experiences that Philadelphia-area medical students face aren't inside classrooms. On the streets, real-life lessons are supplementing physiology lectures for students in a seven-week summer program - Bridging the Gaps: The Philadelphia Community Health Internship Program (PCHIP). Kiame Mahaniah, a first-year student at Thomas Jefferson University School of Medicine, found it "emotionally challenging" to work as a summer intern for the homeless with the Gateway Center, Ninth and Hamilton Streets.
NEWS
May 3, 2010 | By Paul Jablow FOR THE INQUIRER
Christina Pasick has a special memory of the Christmas concert in the dementia unit. The patients at the LIFE day-care center in West Philadelphia were staring silently when she and other members of the Penn Med UltraSounds a cappella group started to sing. But gradually as the medical students raised their voices on such tunes as "Silent Night," they drew out decades-old memories, and the patients started singing, too. "They were the first words they had spoken in months," said Pasick, 22, a first-year University of Pennsylvania medical student from Wall Township, N.J. "The nurses were crying.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state of America's health-care system is grim, and a new emphasis on preventive care is needed to turn it around, Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders said yesterday in Philadelphia. Elders was applauded by hundreds of students attending a regional meeting of the American Medical Student Association. Although her message to the medical students was upbeat, Elders talked mainly about the terrible health problems that beset Americans, particularly children. She said that: Infant mortality is down, but the United States still has a rate worse than that of 21 other countries.
NEWS
March 28, 1994
An interesting factoid entered the health-care debate this past week. It was this: Though cost-cutting is all the rage, the great majority of fourth-year medical students are still headed for careers as high-priced specialists, which in turn drives up the cost of medical care. It also means there's a shortage of primary-care physicians - or so-called generalists. Nowadays, a third of U. S. doctors are generalists; Congress is looking at ways to get the number up to half. So, what would change the students' minds, and nudge them back to the front lines of medicine, the better to dispense ounces of prevention rather than pounds of cure?
NEWS
September 14, 2001 | By James M. O'Neill, Marie McCullough and Zlati Meyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Penn medical students helped drag bodies out of the rubble. A Souderton company offered a tractor for demolition work. A North Philadelphia woman plunked $200 into a collection basket for disaster relief. And when volunteering was not an option, people found ways to show their solidarity - such as the Bucknell University students who wore blue ribbons. When Americans saw the searing images of destruction from hijacked airliners crashing into the World Trade Center and Pentagon on Tuesday, they felt a need to do something, anything.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Pittinger can still see the hospital room on the day two years ago when her daughter Emily was diagnosed with diabetes. "I have this very clear image in my mind of this whole group of people in white coats coming in and talking to me about glucose levels and insulin and ketones," she said. But Pittinger's thoughts were focused at that point on something other than the medical details of her 8-year-old daughter's diabetes. "I was thinking in terms of birthday parties and sleepovers and having babies - what her everyday life would be like," she said.
NEWS
April 29, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Glance at the two snapshots of a hospital patient as if you were a doctor entering the room. They seem similar. Now look at the 15th-century work, The Arnolfini Portrait, by Dutch master Jan van Eyck: a solemn man and woman touching hands. Zoom in on the painting's details. Notice the little dog? OK, zoom out. And in again. See the shoes? The still life? The reflection in the mirror? Go back to the two photographs in a hospital. Did you notice the differences between them?
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They were the best of friends, the kind who lived together, knew each other's family and shared the same goal of becoming doctors after finishing medical school in Philadelphia. So it wasn't strange last Monday evening, hours before their flight from Phoenix to Philadelphia, that Damean Freas, 25, and John Kearney, 23, decided to visit picturesque Oak Creek Canyon in Sedona, Ariz., 100 miles north of Phoenix, to do a little sightseeing. But as darkness fell, they lost their way on a hiking trail, slipped and plunged from a 70-foot-high cliff into a ravine, landing 20 feet from each other, police said.
FOOD
May 13, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
After weeks of lessons on nutritious breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack, the instructors had given the kids exactly what they wanted: a class entirely focused on desserts. And, still, the students were pushing back. "Why does it have to be healthy cheesecake?" asked Oscar Wolfe, 13. "I don't want to make my cheesecake healthy. " And thus the challenge of trying to undo the negative perception of eating right. "Well, as my mom always says, 'You are going to want dessert, so you might as well put something good in it,' " said Sally Vitez, my daughter, and the namesake of My Daughter's Kitchen, the healthy-cooking program being taught by volunteers at 31 urban schools throughout the region.
NEWS
April 29, 2003 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wind whips the bright-white coats of the medical students as they hurry across the parking lot at 10th and Vine and into a beige brick building whose tiny rooms and tight hallways once housed a community of nuns. Soon, it will fill with people describing aches and pains in a cacophony of Asian dialects, jury-rigged English and pantomime. It is Thursday night, just north of the jigsaw of eateries, markets and pottery shops that is Chinatown, and although the free weekly medical clinic at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church and School won't open for 25 minutes, patients are waiting when the students arrive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 13, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
After weeks of lessons on nutritious breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack, the instructors had given the kids exactly what they wanted: a class entirely focused on desserts. And, still, the students were pushing back. "Why does it have to be healthy cheesecake?" asked Oscar Wolfe, 13. "I don't want to make my cheesecake healthy. " And thus the challenge of trying to undo the negative perception of eating right. "Well, as my mom always says, 'You are going to want dessert, so you might as well put something good in it,' " said Sally Vitez, my daughter, and the namesake of My Daughter's Kitchen, the healthy-cooking program being taught by volunteers at 31 urban schools throughout the region.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Paul Farmer, a renowned pioneer of global health care, brought his message about the importance of caring for the world's poor to the University of Pennsylvania this week. Farmer said academic medical centers like Penn can make a huge difference by bringing their model of combining research, training, and hands-on care to places where people lack even basic medical supplies. A Harvard Medical School professor, Farmer has used that approach successfully at the organization he helped found, Partners in Health.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
As one, graduating medical students across the country opened their envelopes Friday and discovered the results of the National Resident Matching Program, learning where they will next go to train. In Camden, one Cooper Medical School of Rowan University student learned he would be staying, matched with the emergency medicine program at Cooper University Hospital. Then another student ran up: "Cooper?" she shouted. "Cooper!" he said, hugging her. Another student ran up. "Cooper?"
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Gov. Wolf plans to urge Pennsylvania medical and dental schools to bolster their teaching on pain management and opioid addiction to help fight prescription drug abuse, he said Monday. Speaking at a White House briefing, Wolf said he hoped Pennsylvania would follow Massachusetts, where medical and dental schools last year agreed to start requiring students to demonstrate skills aimed at preventing painkiller abuse. "That is a really good idea that Pennsylvania can learn from," he said.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Peter Cameron, SCRANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE
SCRANTON - After a career in surgery that spanned four decades, Gino Mori decided to head back to medical school in 2013 to fill some gaps in his education. After all, he completed his undergraduate education in science at Pennsylvania State University in 1953, the year scientists James Watson and Francis Crick are credited with discovering the structure of DNA. "You can imagine that basic science had changed quite a bit," he said with a smile. The 83-year-old physician completed about 40,000 surgeries in his 371/2 years in medicine, but after retiring Jan. 1, 2001, his lifelong thirst for knowledge pushed him back to school.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Though most current and former military personnel use civilian health care, many medical offices aren't prepared for the needs of veterans, soldiers, and their families. The National Board of Medical Examiners in Philadelphia and members of the White House's Joining Forces initiative are working to fix that problem, starting with the next generation of physicians. The 17-member task force recently held several days of meetings here to decide what was most important for doctors to learn about military-related medical issues.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scrunched around a long table, a group of third-year medical students listened sympathetically as Charles McCann recounted a sad, frustrating, real-life story that illustrated the challenges they will face for a professional lifetime. McCann had seen a homeless man in clinic. The man had multiple health problems that couldn't be fixed without addressing his social problems, a big job that was out of McCann's hands. He told McCann he thought he'd be better off - medically - in jail.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the high schoolers last week could diagnose their patient, who had come in with liver issues, they had to figure out how the liver works. There were the hepatic veins and the hepatic artery - but how were they related? Could the connections among the blood vessels shed light on this man's condition? In one room at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, eight high school juniors and seniors in the medical school's inaugural MEDacademy high school summer program searched for answers on their phones, tablets, and laptops.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard to teach empathy in the classroom, yet it's one of the foundations of the doctor-patient relationship. How well physicians can put themselves in their patients' shoes is directly linked with patient satisfaction. "When I was in med school, no one told me how to do that," said Dennis Novack, professor of medicine and associate dean of medical education at Drexel University College of Medicine. "You could watch your mentors, if you were lucky. Or make mistakes. " Numerous studies have shown patients with empathetic caregivers are more likely to stick to their doctor's treatment plan, leading to better health results.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Quick! When a person is deprived of oxygen, which part of the brain is damaged first? When Michael Natter learned the answer - the hippocampus, among other key regions - he promptly drew a cartoon of a dopey hippopotamus hooked to an oxygen tank. Artist's sketchbook in hand, Natter, 29, is drawing his way through medical school at Thomas Jefferson University. He says his art helps him remember and digest the torrent of information. "I study by drawing my notes," says the native New Yorker, who just wrapped up his second year.
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