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Medical Technology

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NEWS
February 27, 1995 | by Henry J. Aaron, New York Times
House Speaker Newt Gingrich says the rise of information technology in medicine "will cause a revolution and will lower the cost of health care. " A technological revolution? Yes. Large savings? No. And one out of two is not good enough for government work. New technology can indeed lower the cost of diagnosis and treatment. But far more typically, it enables doctors to do things they couldn't do before, or reduces the pain and risk of medical procedures. When these things happen, the cost of medicine goes up, not down.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The view through the University of Pennsylvania's newest electron microscope reveals a world of detail so tiny it was thought inaccessible only a few years ago. Magnified by a factor of 10 million, individual atoms take fuzzy form and do a kind of dance inside molecules. The microscope, housed in a narrow brick building off Walnut Street, is a far cry from the familiar staple of high school biology. Eight feet tall and fed 200,000 volts through a cable as wide as a firehose, it heats up the entire room.
NEWS
March 17, 2010
RE JENICE Armstrong's recent column on herpes: As a single, 31-year-old African-American woman who's been infected since I was 16, I'm dismayed by the ignorance and the lack of resources. Until recently, I kept my condition strictly secret. I was involved with a man for eight years and didn't tell him. I always knew I could never have any meaningful relationship with a man without telling him. After eight years, the possibility of marriage came up. I disclosed the fact that I had herpes, got all the information I could and reported it to him. We decided not to marry because we both realized that we had not shown each other our true selves.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Maureen Callaghan, today was to be a time to celebrate as she and her classmates filed into the Academy of Music to accept their associate degrees in medical technology from Hahnemann University's School of Allied Health Professions. Instead, some of them will be wearing yellow armbands over their black graduation robes to protest the university's decision to discontinue a baccalaureate program in medical technology that they had been scheduled to enter in August. "I was looking forward to graduation as a great experience.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
Safeguard Scientifics Inc., Wayne, said today that it is investing $25 million in PixelOptics, a Roanoke, Va., medical technology company developing electronically focusing prescription eyewear. Safeguard, a holding company that buys stakes in growth-stage life sciences and technology businesses, is part of a group of investors that put $45 million into PixelOptics. The Virginia company, founded in 2005, is trying to commercialize its emPower product, which reduces or eliminates distortion in multifocal lenses, Safeguard said.
NEWS
March 10, 1993 | by Philip R. Lee and Richard D. Lamm, From the New York Times
Other industrialized countries have succeeded far better than the United States in controlling rising health care costs. Between 1982 and 1989, six big European countries actually reduced the proportion of the gross domestic product spent on health care. In others, the proportion was either unchanged or the increase was small. Obviously someone is doing something right. Prof. Brian Abel-Smith of the London School of Economics studied how these countries' success. The key, he concluded, is a government effort, through regulation or strict budgets, to limit supply, not demand - the supply of doctors, hospital beds and medical technology and procedures.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Fineman Jaffe, 74, a longtime resident of Huntingdon Valley, died of cancer Sunday, May 12, at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, N.J. For the last 15 years, she and her husband, Marvin, had lived in Skillman, N.J., and Naples, Fla. Mrs. Jaffe was known within her family for her oil portraits of her children and grandchildren, a skill that had been nurtured early in life. Her father's uncle was Samuel Noah Kramer, a Russian immigrant and Philadelphia public-school teacher who became the University of Pennsylvania's Clark research professor of Assyriology, the study of a civilization that flourished in present-day Iraq 4,000 years ago. "Joan would spend weekends there, visiting," in a home rich in culture, Marvin Jaffe said in an interview Wednesday.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | By Theodore Gaillard
The play was cool, careful, calculating. The most flamboyant of chess players, Garry Kasparov, wasn't exhibiting his usual panache, but he was winning. And once, when he made a particularly inspired move, his opponent - IBM's mighty "Deep Blue" supercomputer - crashed. Score one for the humans - this time. Exhibiting human ingenuity, Kasparov made a brilliant adjustment to his first-match defeat. He won going away. But it seems only a matter of time before the rapidly evolving supercomputer emerges as the invincible grand master.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Shriners' Hospital officials confirmed yesterday that they will build a new, $60 million charitable hospital adjacent to Temple University Hospital in North Philadelphia. The new hospital, expected to open by 1996, will replace the 66-year-old Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children on Roosevelt Boulevard in the Northeast. The Shriners will build on North Broad Street near Tioga Street, on the site of the former Fishers' restaurant and three houses, now under demolition. Temple acquired the property last year and will resell it to the Shriners.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2008 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 15 years ago, a hospital asked Paul Fox, whose Jenkintown company sells medical furniture and equipment, if he could supply a chair for a 500-pound patient. He was stunned. "I had never sold a chair for somebody who weighed 500 pounds," he said. It is a measure of how much Americans have grown that such requests are no longer unusual. "We could sell 10 to 15 pieces a month today," Fox said. The obesity epidemic means that more patients are maxing out equipment meant to safely hold people who weigh no more than, say, 250 to 350 pounds.
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NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Every so often, airport screening personnel around the world have been greeted by a strange sight: A tall, red-haired Englishman carrying a clear plastic box with thin tubes and pulleys nestled inside. "Yes, I have had some interesting experiences with that," said Jason Launders, explaining his invention as he sat in a windowless lab in Plymouth Meeting. "Try to explain it to a bunch of Germans. " The scientist created the motorized contraption, which the ECRI Institute uses to test the accuracy of high-tech CT scanners around the world by imitating the function of the human heart.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2015
Helius Medical Technologies Inc. , a Newtown company focused on the treatment of neurological symptoms caused by disease or trauma, has hired surgeon Jonathan Sackier as chief medical officer. Sackier has helped build several companies, including medical technology, research and product-design, and medical contract sales organizations. He served as chairman of Adenosine Therapeutics and founded and funded the Washington Institute of Surgical Endoscopy, a center for education, research, innovation, and technology transfer.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Fineman Jaffe, 74, a longtime resident of Huntingdon Valley, died of cancer Sunday, May 12, at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, N.J. For the last 15 years, she and her husband, Marvin, had lived in Skillman, N.J., and Naples, Fla. Mrs. Jaffe was known within her family for her oil portraits of her children and grandchildren, a skill that had been nurtured early in life. Her father's uncle was Samuel Noah Kramer, a Russian immigrant and Philadelphia public-school teacher who became the University of Pennsylvania's Clark research professor of Assyriology, the study of a civilization that flourished in present-day Iraq 4,000 years ago. "Joan would spend weekends there, visiting," in a home rich in culture, Marvin Jaffe said in an interview Wednesday.
NEWS
September 2, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Medical technology evolves so quickly you wouldn't think there'd be much life left in Robin Cook's 35-year-old best-seller Coma , about a medical student who stumbles upon a ghastly conspiracy at a Boston hospital. But this four-hour mini-series (Mon. and Tues. at 9 p.m.), one of the last collaborative productions of Ridley Scott and his recently departed brother, Tony, is gripping. Its visual and narrative brio is fully cinematic. Lauren Ambrose ( Six Feet Under ) is a student taking a surgical rotation at Peach Tree Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
Safeguard Scientifics Inc., Wayne, said today that it is investing $25 million in PixelOptics, a Roanoke, Va., medical technology company developing electronically focusing prescription eyewear. Safeguard, a holding company that buys stakes in growth-stage life sciences and technology businesses, is part of a group of investors that put $45 million into PixelOptics. The Virginia company, founded in 2005, is trying to commercialize its emPower product, which reduces or eliminates distortion in multifocal lenses, Safeguard said.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey P. Black is out as chief executive of Teleflex Inc., a Limerick firm he has led through a transformation from a diversified industrial manufacturer to one focused on medical technology. Replacing Black is a board member, Benson F. Smith, who for 25 years worked at Teleflex competitor C.R. Bard Inc., rising to the positions of president and chief operating officer, Teleflex said Monday. The company's shares gained 89 cents, or 1.6 percent, to close at $57.21 on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
March 17, 2010
RE JENICE Armstrong's recent column on herpes: As a single, 31-year-old African-American woman who's been infected since I was 16, I'm dismayed by the ignorance and the lack of resources. Until recently, I kept my condition strictly secret. I was involved with a man for eight years and didn't tell him. I always knew I could never have any meaningful relationship with a man without telling him. After eight years, the possibility of marriage came up. I disclosed the fact that I had herpes, got all the information I could and reported it to him. We decided not to marry because we both realized that we had not shown each other our true selves.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2008 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 15 years ago, a hospital asked Paul Fox, whose Jenkintown company sells medical furniture and equipment, if he could supply a chair for a 500-pound patient. He was stunned. "I had never sold a chair for somebody who weighed 500 pounds," he said. It is a measure of how much Americans have grown that such requests are no longer unusual. "We could sell 10 to 15 pieces a month today," Fox said. The obesity epidemic means that more patients are maxing out equipment meant to safely hold people who weigh no more than, say, 250 to 350 pounds.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Viasys Healthcare Inc., a Conshohocken medical technology company, is being acquired by Cardinal Health Inc., the second-largest U.S. drug distributor, for $1.42 billion. After the deal, which has been approved by both companies' boards, is completed this summer, Cardinal Health said yesterday that Viasys would become a wholly owned subsidiary. Cardinal Health, an $80 billion company in Dublin, Ohio, said the acquisition would expand its clinical and medical product offerings worldwide and establish Cardinal as a leader in the $4 billion respiratory-care market.
NEWS
December 15, 2004 | By Newt Gingrich
It is time that we in the United States learn to think of health care as an economic opportunity, not a liability. Despite America's well-documented health-care delivery problems, America's actual health care is the best in the world. U.S. firms are responsible for some of the most important innovations in pharmacology and medical technology. Wealthy foreigners routinely come to the United States for advanced medical services with the best possible outcomes. To take advantage of this position, President Bush should create a new undersecretary for health in the Department of Commerce to promote the American system of health care worldwide.
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