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Medical Waste

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NEWS
May 2, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The state of Pennsylvania, claiming it can do a better job of tracking medical waste than the federal government, has pulled out of an Environmental Protection Agency program designed to curb "red-bag" trash. Gov. Casey said Pennsylvania was washing its hands of the EPA's 10-state pilot program because the state's own efforts offer residents "greater protection. " New state requirements for licensing medical-waste haulers and tracking the waste will outlast the EPA's two-year program, Casey said in a statement.
NEWS
August 31, 2008 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Swimmers and surfers headed back into the water here and in other Shore towns yesterday after officials gave the all clear following a wave of medical-waste discoveries that threatened the Labor Day weekend - at least for water lovers. Beaches reopened after early-morning inspections found no more debris from here to Avalon, where syringes and other medical waste had washed ashore over the last week. But the late-summer scare left some beachgoers a bit cautious about heading into the ocean.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Medical-waste disposal is the modern-day equivalent of the witch's caldron - a big, smoking pot with who-knows-what kinds of bad things inside. That's the image of this industry people love to hate - an image fueled in part by hypodermic needles washed up on the Jersey shore. But it is an image undeserved, said Thomas K. Kilmer, president of K.S. Processing Co. Inc. in Marcus Hook. "People react emotionally to that kind of situation. The whole environmental issue is blowing up," Kilmer said.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
Hospital waste was found in a load of ash being hauled to the Burlington County Landfill yesterday from a Mount Holly hospital when the garbage truck carrying it overturned in Westampton Township, officials said. Included in the ash were several intact hospital vials and a pair of scissors that were charred but whole, apparently surviving the nearly 2,000- degree temperatures in the incinerator at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County in Mount Holly, officials said. The items posed only a minimal health risk, according to an official with the Burlington County Health Department.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A year after New Jersey lawmakers began to draft a comprehensive assault on ocean pollution, they have yet to adopt one of the cornerstones of the program they devised - a bill to track medical waste from "cradle to grave. " Trouble is, the measure cannot seem to get out of legislative infancy. Everyone seems to like the idea of tracking medical waste to ensure proper disposal and to catch illegal dumpers. There are just some tricky issues that won't go away. These have kept the bill bouncing back and forth between the Assembly and Senate, issues such as: What do you do if there aren't enough incinerators to handle the medical waste?
NEWS
September 10, 2008
New Jersey's environmental crimes unit is to be commended for quickly finding the apparent culprit responsible for medical waste that washed up on the beaches in Avalon just as the summer vacation season was ending. Quickly finding a suspect helped erase understandable fears that the Shore had experienced a repeat of the near ruinous "Syringe Tide" that hit the beaches two decades ago. Main Line dentist Thomas McFarland, who owned a home across the bay, allegedly took his motorboat to Townsend Inlet on Aug. 22 and dumped a bag full of 300 dental-type needles, along with 180 cotton swabs and other materials from his medical office in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Infectious medical waste, including soiled bed pads, bandages and rubber gloves and a used syringe, has been found dumped in a garage behind an abandoned laundry in the Germantown section, a city official said yesterday. The waste, soiled "with feces (and) body fluids," was among other debris in two garage bays behind the old Manheim Laundry in the 5300 block of Germantown Avenue, said Richard Zipin, an inspector with the city's Department of Health. The waste is still at the site.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
After several weeks in which syringes and vials have washed up along parts of the Jersey shore, lawmakers are poised today to consider a bill to track medical waste - but not everyone's medical waste. Dentists, podiatrists and home health-care agencies already are exempt from the requirements of the legislation. State Environmental Protection Commissioner Richard T. Dewling says they shouldn't be. "Right now, the interest and the focus has to be on everybody. You can't exclude anybody," he said in an interview earlier this week.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Any notion of building a hospital waste-burning incinerator in Chesilhurst is up in smoke, according to Sen. Daniel J. Dalton (D., Camden and Gloucester). That point of view, he said, is based on legislation signed by Gov. Kean March 6 as part of the state's Comprehensive Regulated Medical Waste Management Act. Though the main focus of the law was on tracking medical waste and stiffening fines for illegal dumpers, Dalton co-authored the section that made it illegal for anyone to apply for or grant permits or to begin operation of new commercial waste-burning incinerators anywhere in the state over the next year.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A trailer truck loaded with infectious medical waste dropped seven containers onto Interstate 95 in Lower Makefield, Bucks County, late Thursday. Several of the containers, similar to trash cans, broke open, scattering the waste over the highway and forcing the closing of the southbound lanes for more than seven hours, authorities said. State police, aided by members of the Yardley-Makefield Fire Company, shut down the highway from the Scudders Falls Bridge south to the Newtown exit.
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NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTER A fog of thick, black diesel smoke spewed into the neighborhood air as Horace Strand watched the endless line of trucks rumble along Thurlow Street, just before dawn on the day 23 years ago that the Westinghouse incinerator opened along the Chester riverfront. It brought him to tears. Dust and debris from the trucks headed to the incinerator and to another plant that sterilized contaminated medical waste became the bane of the neighborhood. Residents complained of respiratory problems.
SPORTS
June 8, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - On a day in which the judge lost his temper twice with Roger Clemens' lawyers, the defense turned Wednesday to the soon-to-be-ex-wife of Brian McNamee, Eileen, in the former pitcher's perjury trial. Brian McNamee testified Eileen McNamee harangued him with the words "You're going to go down! You're going to go down! You're going to go down!" - pestering him until he saved medical waste from an alleged steroids injection of Clemens so that he wouldn't be the fall guy in any sort of drugs investigation.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
VENTNOR, N.J. - Forty-seven syringes, believed to be medical waste that was improperly disposed of, were found Monday on the beachfront between Cambridge and Dorset Avenues after an initial discovery by an early-morning jogger, according to police. The hypodermic needles were not thought to have washed in from the ocean before landing on the bulkhead and dune areas and on the Boardwalk, Ventnor Police Lt. Howard Bloom said Monday afternoon. After a search of the area by police, the Atlantic County Health Department judged the beach safe to remain open.
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Main Line dentist who dumped syringes and other medical waste in the waters off Avalon, closing beaches there and setting off a panic at the Jersey Shore shortly before Labor Day 2008, yesterday agreed to pay $100,000 to the resort. Thomas W. McFarland Jr., 61, of Wynnewood, pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful discharge of water pollutants before Superior Court Judge Raymond A. Batten. McFarland will serve no jail time. The charge - a fourth-degree crime - was downgraded from two third-degree counts that each carried a penalty of up to five years in prison.
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
Thomas McFarland will have to pay $100,000 for having dumped needles that washed up along the beaches of Avalon, but the Montgomery County dentist won't go to jail. Yesterday, McFarland, 61, of Wynnewood, pleaded guilty to a fourth-degree charge of dumping medical debris from his practice into the waters near Avalon in summer 2008. The plea deal means McFarland will serve probation and pay the borough $100,000. The night of Aug. 22, 2008, according to court documents, McFarland set off in his Boston Whaler from his waterfront home in Middle Township, near Avalon, into Townsends Inlet and dumped nearly 250 dental needles, capsules used to hold dental filling material, cotton swabs and other debris into the water.
NEWS
December 4, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Main Line dentist will go to trial in April in state Superior Court in Cape May County on charges that he dumped hundreds of pieces of medical waste into a Jersey Shore waterway and fouled Avalon beaches in August 2008. Thomas McFarland, 60, of Wynnewood, is charged with the unlawful discharge of a pollutant and disposal of medical waste. Investigators said he dumped a bag containing 260 used syringes, 180 cotton swabs, and other items from his practice off his Boston Whaler boat into Townsends Inlet on Aug. 22, 2008.
NEWS
August 1, 2009 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Main Line dentist accused of dumping medical waste off the Jersey Shore last summer has hired the Camden County defense attorney who recently represented former State Sen. Wayne Bryant. Thomas McFarland Jr., 60, who operated his practice from his Wynnewood home and owns a summer residence in the Avalon Manor section of Middle Township, yesterday appeared before Superior Court Judge Raymond Batten with Cherry Hill lawyer Carl Poplar. In May, McFarland was denied admission to a pre-trial intervention program that would have allowed him to avoid a trial and the possibility of jail time.
NEWS
July 30, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suspicions of illegal dumping, and the widespread concern that follows, can really skew environmental statistics. New Jersey's 260 ocean and bay beaches were closed 208 times last summer, a 46 percent increase over the previous year. But more than half of the closures were attributed to medical waste - some of it deliberately dumped off shore, according to investigators, and discovered on Cape May County beaches. The summer of 2008 "was a fluke," said Virginia Loftin, a research scientist with the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
July 16, 2009
Fumo's sentence was an insult On Saturday, you reported the release of H. Beatty Chadwick, a lawyer who spent 168 months in prison for contempt of court. He was never convicted of a crime, and, indeed, 14 years of investigation into his alleged crime (hiding money from his ex-wife) failed to find any supporting evidence, according to your story. And this Tuesday we learned that former State Sen. Vincent Fumo, another lawyer, who was convicted by a jury on 137 counts of corruption, was sentenced by federal Judge Ronald Buckwalter to a paltry 55 months in prison!
NEWS
May 9, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Main Line dentist accused of dumping medical waste off the Jersey Shore last summer will have to stand trial. Thomas McFarland Jr., 60, who operated his practice from his Wynnewood home and owns a summer residence in the Avalon Manor section of Middle Township, yesterday was denied admission to a pre-trial intervention program. Acceptance would have allowed him to avoid court and eliminated the possibility of jail time. Eventually, his record would have been wiped clean.
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