CollectionsMedicare
IN THE NEWS

Medicare

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 9, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush yesterday signed into law the most sweeping changes to Medicare since its creation nearly four decades ago, including a new prescription-drug benefit for older Americans. The landmark law also will inject competition into the government health-care program for the first time, by letting private companies compete with traditional Medicare. Bush said the changes would bring Medicare into the 21st century. Critics predicted they would destroy the health-care safety net that serves 40 million older Americans.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | BY JOHN SWEENEY
Rich Welsh (Guest Opinion, July 30) appears to have been taken in by the Republican congressional leadership's disinformation to distract citizens from Rep. John Fox's votes for the Newt Gingrich budget that made deep cuts in Medicare. In reality, it is the Republican leaders and their right-wing allies who are "playing dirty on Medicare" in an attempt to undermine the AFL-CIO's efforts to educate the American public. They have even stooped to threatening libel suits against TV and radio stations that run AFL-CIO ads documenting votes for drastic cuts in Medicare by members of Congress, including Jon Fox. Welsh parrots the GOP's line that House Speaker Newt Gingrich wasn't referring to Medicare when he said, "We think it's going to wither on the vine.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama's plan to raise Medicare premiums for upper-income seniors would create five new income brackets to squeeze more revenue for the government from the top tiers of retirees, the administration revealed Friday. First details of the plan emerged after Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testified to Congress on the president's budget. As released two days earlier, the budget included only a vague description of a controversial proposal that has grown more ambitious since Obama last floated it. "Means testing" has been part of Medicare since the George W. Bush administration, but ramping it up is bound to stir controversy.
NEWS
August 4, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
More and more seniors are opting to remain in the workforce nowadays, even after their Social Security kicks in, leaving questions about Medicare benefits for another day. When another day arrives, chances are a retiree needs help in deciding where to go for supplemental health coverage, whether to sign up with an HMO or any one of the more than 40 insurance providers registered in Pennsylvania. Where does one find this kind of free help? In Delaware County it's an agency called Horizons Unlimited, which administers a state-funded Medicare health insurance counseling program known as APPRISE.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Howard thought he was prepared for old age. The former government worker had managed to save $130,000 for retirement. He owned his ranch house in a suburb of Washington. And he had monthly income of nearly $2,300 from a pension and Social Security. Because he was 65, Howard automatically qualified for Medicare, the federal health-insurance program for the elderly. But just to be on the safe side, he bought four health-insurance policies. "I thought I had all the bases covered," Howard, a 72-year-old amputee, said in a recent interview.
NEWS
January 8, 1998
Republicans greeted President Clinton's proposal to expand Medicare to include the "near elderly" with all the grace Socks showed Buddy. Fangs bared and back arched. California Republican Bill Thomas, chairman of the House Ways and Means subcommittee on health, said, "If the era of big government is over, why is the president proposing all these government expansions?" Texas Republican Sen. Phil Gramm called the plan "99 percent politics and 1 percent public policy. " And Ohio Republican John R. Kasich, head of the House Budget Committee, said there was no way Congress would approve.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
LAST WEEK, I had to pay cash for my prescription because either Blue Cross' or our government's computers weren't updated to the changes in Medicare. Added to that aggravation is the unabashed greed the pharmaceutical industry expects us to support. My prescription plan has an annual cap. Because of that, I know the retail cost was $173 last year. This time, I had to pay $200. That increase, I suspect, is due solely to the federal government's paying either the whole freight or the difference in private coverage.
NEWS
August 14, 2009
MEDICARE is not the panacea many make it out to be. Its costs are exploding and fraud is rampant - just another poorly administered federal program. Moreover, the projections in 1961 were completely wrong such that its present-day cost is hundreds of billions in excess of the estimates. Ronald Reagan was right in 1961 to object to government involvement - and if he were alive today, it's clear that he would be against Obamacare. John Belli, Philadelphia
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Steve Peoples, Associated Press
WARREN, Ohio - Republican vice presidential contender Paul Ryan says he never would have included a $700 billion Medicare cut in his budget if President Obama hadn't done it first. "He put those cuts there," Ryan said Thursday, responding to a reporter's question. "We would never have done it in the first place. " Medicare, the health-care program for tens of millions of seniors, has become a key issue in the race for the White House. The Wisconsin congressman is perhaps best known for authoring a controversial budget plan that would transform Medicare into a voucher-like system.
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | BY RICH WELSH
The AFL-CIO is saturating radio with a commercial about Medicare. It starts out with a woman explaining how Medicare is peace of mind for senior citizens. The announcer then breaks in, saying that Newt Gingrich has his own ideas about Medicare. A clip is then played with Speaker Gingrich saying, "We don't get rid of it through a transition. But we believe it's going to wither on the vine. " The Democrats during the Medicare debates several months ago tried to use this statement on the floor of the House of Representatives.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 25, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
PMA Medical Specialists L.L.C., a group of 54 physicians with offices in Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties, has applied with a Maryland company to form an Accountable Care Organization with 7,800 Medicare beneficiaries, the group said Tuesday. Accountable Care Organizations, or ACOs, are designed to improve care and reduce costs by emphasizing coordination. Typically, Medicare and the ACO share the savings, if there are any. PMA's partner in Aledade Freedom ACO is Aledade, a Bethesda firm that in June announced the formation of a separate ACO with Gateway Medical Associates.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
Enrolling in Medicare can be stressful and confusing, but delay signing up and it can also set you back a bundle. Late enrollment penalties can hike a monthly premium by 10 percent or more - for the rest of your life. More than 750,000 Medicare beneficiaries have made that mistake, boosting their Part B premiums, on average, by 30 percent, or  an extra $440 a year . The problem is getting worse, too. With more people working past their 65th birthday and still getting health care coverage through their employers, they may not ask about Medicare until they miss their deadline.
NEWS
July 25, 2016
A research letter published Wednesday in JAMA Psychiatry found that Medicare beneficiaries had the highest and most rapidly growing rate of "opioid use disorder. " Six of every 1,000 recipients struggle with the condition, compared with one out of every 1,000 patients covered through commercial insurance plans. The letter also concluded that Medicare beneficiaries may face a treatment gap. In 2013, doctors prescribed a high number of opioid prescription painkillers for this population, but far fewer prescriptions for buprenorphine- naloxone, the only effective drug therapy for opioid use disorder covered by Medicare Part D. More than 300,000 Medicare recipients battle with opioid use disorder, according to the study.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
More than nine out of 10 doctors at the Hospital of the Fox Chase Cancer Center received payments from drug and medical-device firms in 2014, an analysis of Medicare payments data by ProPublica found. Its rate of 92 percent ranked Fox Chase highest in the Philadelphia region for the percentage of affiliated doctors accepting payments from pharmaceutical or medical-device firms, the data showed. Fox Chase, which ranked 10th nationally for its percentage of affiliated doctors receiving payments of any size, also had the region's highest percentage of doctors who collected at least $5,000.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, STAFF WRITER
A Delaware County podiatrist is one of 301 individuals charged in a nationwide Medicare-fraud bust spanning 36 federal districts and involving approximately $900 million in fraudulent payments. Stephen A. Monaco, 59, of Broomall, was charged with submitting $5 million in false claims to Medicare, Medicaid, and four private insurers through his Havertown practice, A Foot Above Podiatry, U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger announced Wednesday. Between 2008 and 2014, prosecutors say, Monaco submitted claims for procedures that did not take place, and procedures that were medically unnecessary and therefore not reimbursable by Medicare and other insurance companies.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When the feds closed Brotherly Love Ambulance Inc. in October 2011 amid allegations of Medicare fraud, the owner's son quickly opened his own ambulance company and picked up where his mother had left off. For a while, anyway. Bassem Kuran, who also was a driver for Brotherly Love, is to be arraigned this month for making false statements in a healthcare matter, related to his operation of VIP Ambulance Inc. For years, teams of federal officials have been trying to stamp out this "whack-a-mole" pattern of one fraudulent ambulance operator shutting down only to have another - sometimes headed by a friend or family member - replace it. But since 2014, authorities have hit on an effective strategy.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The owner of a defunct Northeast Philadelphia ambulance company was charged with Medicare fraud for transporting patients who could walk and did not meet the federal program's requirements for ambulance services, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania said Monday. Bassem Kuran, who was the sole owner of VIP Ambulance Inc., applied to participate in Medicare in October 2011, soon after his previous employer, Brotherly Love Ambulance Inc. was shut down for the same type of fraud.
NEWS
May 15, 2016
Q. How can I be certain I'm picking a good nursing home? A. The majority of people entering a nursing home are doing so from a hospital, with guidance from a discharge planner. That said, knowing about long-term care facilities in your area will help ensure that you or your loved one is going to the most appropriate one. The website Medicare.gov offers a "Nursing Home Compare" section, searchable by city and state, where you can find information about the ratings of a particular facility.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The University of Pennsylvania Health System agreed to pay $75,787 to resolve allegations that its home health unit, Penn Care at Home, submitted claims to Medicare for services not rendered and for services that were not reasonable or necessary, the United States Attorney for the Eastern Disctrict of Pennsylvania said Friday. As part of the settlement, which orginated in a whistle-blower lawsuit, the health system agreed to implement new compliance measures and to submit annual compliance reports through 2019.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
By Peter Ubel Even before Obamacare became the law of the land, the U.S. health-care system was undergoing a dramatic transformation. Millions of people were shifting from generous health-insurance plans to consumer-directed ones that pair low monthly premiums with high out-of-pocket costs. This shift has been encouraged by employers eager to reduce the cost of employee benefits. It has also been encouraged by market enthusiasts who contend that the U.S. health-care system needs to be more like the traditional consumer economy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|